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PuttPutt 31-12-2018 12:09 PM

fuschia propogation
 
I have some hardy fuschia plants inherited from my neighbour.
I am trying to propogate from cuttings, I start them in a glass of water till the roots show but on transfering them to a mixture of peat, sharp sand and vermiculite they fail.
Could you please help this newby? Just love those fuschias.

Jim S 31-12-2018 12:44 PM

fuschia propogation
 
On Mon, 31 Dec 2018 04:09:51 -0800 (PST), PuttPutt wrote:

I have some hardy fuschia plants inherited from my neighbour.
I am trying to propogate from cuttings, I start them in a glass of water till the roots show but on transfering them to a mixture of peat, sharp sand and vermiculite they fail.
Could you please help this newby? Just love those fuschias.


Two choices in IMO and I have 15+.
Just take ordinary cuttings directly into your mixture. Expect some to fail
so take enough (hard wood not soft cuttings)
OR heel the plants into the ground or even a tub and wait for them to
sprout in the spring. Then either split the root ball or rip off the
budding stemm with the old root.
They are hard to kill and I'm on Tyneside where it can get chilly.
--
Jim S

PuttPutt 31-12-2018 01:15 PM

fuschia propogation
 
On Monday, December 31, 2018 at 12:44:30 PM UTC, Jim S wrote:
On Mon, 31 Dec 2018 04:09:51 -0800 (PST), PuttPutt wrote:

I have some hardy fuschia plants inherited from my neighbour.
I am trying to propogate from cuttings, I start them in a glass of water till the roots show but on transfering them to a mixture of peat, sharp sand and vermiculite they fail.
Could you please help this newby? Just love those fuschias.


Two choices in IMO and I have 15+.
Just take ordinary cuttings directly into your mixture. Expect some to fail
so take enough (hard wood not soft cuttings)
OR heel the plants into the ground or even a tub and wait for them to
sprout in the spring. Then either split the root ball or rip off the
budding stemm with the old root.
They are hard to kill and I'm on Tyneside where it can get chilly.
--
Jim S


Thanks for that Jim, due to the mild weather so far there are plenty of candidates, I'll give that a try.

Derek[_6_] 31-12-2018 01:40 PM

fuschia propogation
 
On Mon, 31 Dec 2018 04:09:51 -0800 (PST), PuttPutt
wrote:

I have some hardy fuschia plants inherited from my neighbour.


Take hardwood cuttings, about ten inches long, at least the thickness
of a pencil, any thinner and they may rot off, bury them in soil, pot
or ground, till only the top two inches are showing, firm in, and walk
away!
Normaly you would do this in september but give it a try, Next year
you will have plenty more fuchsia's


I have a dozen buckets with about a dozen in each, taken in september
have about a 98% success rate,

You have nothing to lose!




Stewart Robert Hinsley 31-12-2018 04:31 PM

fuschia propogation
 
On 31/12/2018 12:09, PuttPutt wrote:
I have some hardy fuschia plants inherited from my neighbour.
I am trying to propogate from cuttings, I start them in a glass of water till the roots show but on transfering them to a mixture of peat, sharp sand and vermiculite they fail.
Could you please help this newby? Just love those fuschias.


I found fuchsia easy from tip cuttings in potting compost with bottom
heat in spring, but from everyone else's comments it seems that there
are other ways of propagating fuchsias.

My guess would be that you damage root hairs when transferring cuttings
from water to compost, and the reserves in the cuttings aren't
sufficient to replace the root hairs, after expenditure on producing the
roots in the first place.

--
SRH

David Rance[_3_] 31-12-2018 11:55 PM

fuschia propogation
 
On Mon, 31 Dec 2018 14:55:10 Chris Hogg wrote:

On Mon, 31 Dec 2018 04:09:51 -0800 (PST), PuttPutt
wrote:

I have some hardy fuschia plants inherited from my neighbour.
I am trying to propogate from cuttings, I start them in a glass of
water till the roots show but on transfering them to a mixture of
peat, sharp sand and vermiculite they fail.
Could you please help this newby? Just love those fuschias.


Transferring cuttings rooted that way is often a bit difficult. It's
as if the roots in the water are in some way different to roots that
grow in the soil.


That's brought back some memories from what I learned at school some
seventy years ago. I was told by my primary school teacher that if you
try to grow anything in water, be it seed or cuttings, they produce what
she called water roots which were always somewhat less sturdy than roots
grown in soil. I tried growing runner beans by starting them off in a
jam jar and blotting paper (to wedge them to the side of the jar so that
they didn't rot in the water at the bottom - and I'm sure generations of
children have done the same). My experiments showed me that beans
started off thus were never grew as strongly when planted out as those
that were started in soil. Well, obviously they weren't getting the
nutrients they needed from the water. (I hadn't heard of hydroponics
that long ago!)

Therefore I've always simply stuck cuttings straight into the ground,
whether they be vines, roses or fuchsias. With vines I could get a good
80% of them taking, probably a bit less with other cuttings.

David

--
David Rance writing from Caversham, Reading, UK

PuttPutt 08-01-2019 06:06 PM

fuschia propogation
 
On Monday, December 31, 2018 at 11:57:39 PM UTC, David Rance wrote:
On Mon, 31 Dec 2018 14:55:10 Chris Hogg wrote:

On Mon, 31 Dec 2018 04:09:51 -0800 (PST), PuttPutt
wrote:

I have some hardy fuschia plants inherited from my neighbour.
I am trying to propogate from cuttings, I start them in a glass of
water till the roots show but on transfering them to a mixture of
peat, sharp sand and vermiculite they fail.
Could you please help this newby? Just love those fuschias.


Transferring cuttings rooted that way is often a bit difficult. It's
as if the roots in the water are in some way different to roots that
grow in the soil.


That's brought back some memories from what I learned at school some
seventy years ago. I was told by my primary school teacher that if you
try to grow anything in water, be it seed or cuttings, they produce what
she called water roots which were always somewhat less sturdy than roots
grown in soil. I tried growing runner beans by starting them off in a
jam jar and blotting paper (to wedge them to the side of the jar so that
they didn't rot in the water at the bottom - and I'm sure generations of
children have done the same). My experiments showed me that beans
started off thus were never grew as strongly when planted out as those
that were started in soil. Well, obviously they weren't getting the
nutrients they needed from the water. (I hadn't heard of hydroponics
that long ago!)

Therefore I've always simply stuck cuttings straight into the ground,
whether they be vines, roses or fuchsias. With vines I could get a good
80% of them taking, probably a bit less with other cuttings.

David

--
David Rance writing from Caversham, Reading, UK


Thanks all for the replies, a wealth of knowledge gained.
My neighbour was it dome time a gardener at Quenby Hall and when he moved out I tried to save some of his plants before the garden was bulldozed, I only have fuscia and pinks from my efforts.

Jim S 08-01-2019 06:12 PM

fuschia propogation
 
On Tue, 8 Jan 2019 10:06:10 -0800 (PST), PuttPutt wrote:

On Monday, December 31, 2018 at 11:57:39 PM UTC, David Rance wrote:
On Mon, 31 Dec 2018 14:55:10 Chris Hogg wrote:

On Mon, 31 Dec 2018 04:09:51 -0800 (PST), PuttPutt
wrote:

I have some hardy fuschia plants inherited from my neighbour.
I am trying to propogate from cuttings, I start them in a glass of
water till the roots show but on transfering them to a mixture of
peat, sharp sand and vermiculite they fail.
Could you please help this newby? Just love those fuschias.

Transferring cuttings rooted that way is often a bit difficult. It's
as if the roots in the water are in some way different to roots that
grow in the soil.


That's brought back some memories from what I learned at school some
seventy years ago. I was told by my primary school teacher that if you
try to grow anything in water, be it seed or cuttings, they produce what
she called water roots which were always somewhat less sturdy than roots
grown in soil. I tried growing runner beans by starting them off in a
jam jar and blotting paper (to wedge them to the side of the jar so that
they didn't rot in the water at the bottom - and I'm sure generations of
children have done the same). My experiments showed me that beans
started off thus were never grew as strongly when planted out as those
that were started in soil. Well, obviously they weren't getting the
nutrients they needed from the water. (I hadn't heard of hydroponics
that long ago!)

Therefore I've always simply stuck cuttings straight into the ground,
whether they be vines, roses or fuchsias. With vines I could get a good
80% of them taking, probably a bit less with other cuttings.

David

--
David Rance writing from Caversham, Reading, UK


Thanks all for the replies, a wealth of knowledge gained.
My neighbour was it dome time a gardener at Quenby Hall and when he moved out I tried to save some of his plants before the garden was bulldozed, I only have fuscia and pinks from my efforts.


What more do you need?
Next season jot down the colours of the flowers and if two similar are
adjacent, then move them. They are very forgiving. Some will turn into
trees if you leave them. I cut mine near the ground, but leave one stalk
visible so I don't stand on it in the winter.
--
Jim S


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