Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1   Report Post  
Old 03-06-2019, 11:30 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Jul 2006
Posts: 2,671
Default Contaminated manure, again?

Last autumn, as part of redesigning and replanting the garden here, I
bought an expensive magnolia. I also brought a camellia over from my
previous property, as it was a favourite of my late wife's.

I closely followed the instructions on the nursery's web site about
planting the magnolia, in particular about digging an adequate sized
hole and forking some manure into the bottom. Not having access to
manure, I bought a bag of 'farmyard manure' from our local Wyevale,
and dug about half of it into the bottom of the hole, together with
some garden compost, and planted the magnolia. The remainder of the
manure I used as a circle of mulch around the camellia, a little out
from main stem so as not to burn the surface roots in case the manure
was a bit fresh (it was certainly quite smelly!).

When the magnolia came into flower in the spring, the flowers were
much smaller than I expected. Nor did the camellia have many flowers.
Since then, the camellia has not looked very happy: all the leaves
look a bit sickly, but some new growth is appearing. The magnolia OTOH
is hanging on by a thread: a few leaves have appeared, but they are
small and brownish around the edges. I've given them both sequestrine,
and sulphate of magnesium and sulphate of ammonia, in case they were
just lacking in the relevant nutrients. It didn't make much
difference.

I think the camellia will pull through eventually, but I'm not sure
about the magnolia. The RHS web site says that fruit trees and shrubs
damaged by contaminated manures are likely to recover next year. I
hope they're right! https://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/profile?pid=477 Does
anyone have a view on the chances of the magnolia recovering? If it
doesn't, and eventually dies, I will have to think very carefully
before replacing it or planting anything else in that position. I'll
probably have to dig out the hole and remove the soil completely
before I trust anything else to be planted there. :-((

Of course, I can't be certain that the manure was the source of the
problem, but I certainly won't be buying any manure in the future from
Wyevale, just in case. A salutary lesson!

--

Chris

Gardening in West Cornwall, looking E, Sheltered and partially shaded by trees to the W and SW

  #2   Report Post  
Old 04-06-2019, 07:51 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Sep 2008
Posts: 1,932
Default Contaminated manure, again?

On 03/06/19 11:30, Chris Hogg wrote:
Last autumn, as part of redesigning and replanting the garden here, I
bought an expensive magnolia. I also brought a camellia over from my
previous property, as it was a favourite of my late wife's.

I closely followed the instructions on the nursery's web site about
planting the magnolia, in particular about digging an adequate sized
hole and forking some manure into the bottom. Not having access to
manure, I bought a bag of 'farmyard manure' from our local Wyevale,
and dug about half of it into the bottom of the hole, together with
some garden compost, and planted the magnolia. The remainder of the
manure I used as a circle of mulch around the camellia, a little out
from main stem so as not to burn the surface roots in case the manure
was a bit fresh (it was certainly quite smelly!).

When the magnolia came into flower in the spring, the flowers were
much smaller than I expected. Nor did the camellia have many flowers.
Since then, the camellia has not looked very happy: all the leaves
look a bit sickly, but some new growth is appearing. The magnolia OTOH
is hanging on by a thread: a few leaves have appeared, but they are
small and brownish around the edges. I've given them both sequestrine,
and sulphate of magnesium and sulphate of ammonia, in case they were
just lacking in the relevant nutrients. It didn't make much
difference.

I think the camellia will pull through eventually, but I'm not sure
about the magnolia. The RHS web site says that fruit trees and shrubs
damaged by contaminated manures are likely to recover next year. I
hope they're right! https://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/profile?pid=477 Does
anyone have a view on the chances of the magnolia recovering? If it
doesn't, and eventually dies, I will have to think very carefully
before replacing it or planting anything else in that position. I'll
probably have to dig out the hole and remove the soil completely
before I trust anything else to be planted there. :-((

Of course, I can't be certain that the manure was the source of the
problem, but I certainly won't be buying any manure in the future from
Wyevale, just in case. A salutary lesson!


Could the magnolia be too wet, rather than it being the compost/manure?

I put a Magnolia sieboldii in a place I thought was ok. It was not at
the lowest part of the garden. It seemed ok until we had a lot of heavy
rain (not sure I remember what that is!), when I noticed the ground on
one side of the plant was waterlogged. Seemed the clay was particularly
impervious there and it was acting as a dam. I dug a channel - and a few
months later a new path had land drains to remove the water. But then
Sod's Law ensured a prolonged dry spell, and it got too dry for too
long. It died about 2 years after I planted it.

--

Jeff
  #3   Report Post  
Old 04-06-2019, 01:13 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Jul 2006
Posts: 2,671
Default Contaminated manure, again?

On Tue, 4 Jun 2019 07:51:34 +0100, Jeff Layman
wrote:

On 03/06/19 11:30, Chris Hogg wrote:
Last autumn, as part of redesigning and replanting the garden here, I
bought an expensive magnolia. I also brought a camellia over from my
previous property, as it was a favourite of my late wife's.

I closely followed the instructions on the nursery's web site about
planting the magnolia, in particular about digging an adequate sized
hole and forking some manure into the bottom. Not having access to
manure, I bought a bag of 'farmyard manure' from our local Wyevale,
and dug about half of it into the bottom of the hole, together with
some garden compost, and planted the magnolia. The remainder of the
manure I used as a circle of mulch around the camellia, a little out
from main stem so as not to burn the surface roots in case the manure
was a bit fresh (it was certainly quite smelly!).

When the magnolia came into flower in the spring, the flowers were
much smaller than I expected. Nor did the camellia have many flowers.
Since then, the camellia has not looked very happy: all the leaves
look a bit sickly, but some new growth is appearing. The magnolia OTOH
is hanging on by a thread: a few leaves have appeared, but they are
small and brownish around the edges. I've given them both sequestrine,
and sulphate of magnesium and sulphate of ammonia, in case they were
just lacking in the relevant nutrients. It didn't make much
difference.

I think the camellia will pull through eventually, but I'm not sure
about the magnolia. The RHS web site says that fruit trees and shrubs
damaged by contaminated manures are likely to recover next year. I
hope they're right! https://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/profile?pid=477 Does
anyone have a view on the chances of the magnolia recovering? If it
doesn't, and eventually dies, I will have to think very carefully
before replacing it or planting anything else in that position. I'll
probably have to dig out the hole and remove the soil completely
before I trust anything else to be planted there. :-((

Of course, I can't be certain that the manure was the source of the
problem, but I certainly won't be buying any manure in the future from
Wyevale, just in case. A salutary lesson!


Could the magnolia be too wet, rather than it being the compost/manure?

I put a Magnolia sieboldii in a place I thought was ok. It was not at
the lowest part of the garden. It seemed ok until we had a lot of heavy
rain (not sure I remember what that is!), when I noticed the ground on
one side of the plant was waterlogged. Seemed the clay was particularly
impervious there and it was acting as a dam. I dug a channel - and a few
months later a new path had land drains to remove the water. But then
Sod's Law ensured a prolonged dry spell, and it got too dry for too
long. It died about 2 years after I planted it.


Thanks Jeff, but I' pretty sure it's not too wet. Although the soil is
a heavy loam, I don't get puddles anywhere on the flowerbeds, even
after last night's heavy and much needed rain (stair-rods and T&L at
5AM). I think it too much of a coincidence that both the camellia and
the magnolia both had manure and both are now not happy.

--

Chris

Gardening in West Cornwall, looking E, Sheltered and partially shaded by trees to the W and SW
  #4   Report Post  
Old 04-06-2019, 02:51 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Sep 2008
Posts: 1,932
Default Contaminated manure, again?

On 04/06/19 13:13, Chris Hogg wrote:
On Tue, 4 Jun 2019 07:51:34 +0100, Jeff Layman
wrote:

On 03/06/19 11:30, Chris Hogg wrote:
Last autumn, as part of redesigning and replanting the garden here, I
bought an expensive magnolia. I also brought a camellia over from my
previous property, as it was a favourite of my late wife's.

I closely followed the instructions on the nursery's web site about
planting the magnolia, in particular about digging an adequate sized
hole and forking some manure into the bottom. Not having access to
manure, I bought a bag of 'farmyard manure' from our local Wyevale,
and dug about half of it into the bottom of the hole, together with
some garden compost, and planted the magnolia. The remainder of the
manure I used as a circle of mulch around the camellia, a little out
from main stem so as not to burn the surface roots in case the manure
was a bit fresh (it was certainly quite smelly!).

When the magnolia came into flower in the spring, the flowers were
much smaller than I expected. Nor did the camellia have many flowers.
Since then, the camellia has not looked very happy: all the leaves
look a bit sickly, but some new growth is appearing. The magnolia OTOH
is hanging on by a thread: a few leaves have appeared, but they are
small and brownish around the edges. I've given them both sequestrine,
and sulphate of magnesium and sulphate of ammonia, in case they were
just lacking in the relevant nutrients. It didn't make much
difference.

I think the camellia will pull through eventually, but I'm not sure
about the magnolia. The RHS web site says that fruit trees and shrubs
damaged by contaminated manures are likely to recover next year. I
hope they're right! https://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/profile?pid=477 Does
anyone have a view on the chances of the magnolia recovering? If it
doesn't, and eventually dies, I will have to think very carefully
before replacing it or planting anything else in that position. I'll
probably have to dig out the hole and remove the soil completely
before I trust anything else to be planted there. :-((

Of course, I can't be certain that the manure was the source of the
problem, but I certainly won't be buying any manure in the future from
Wyevale, just in case. A salutary lesson!


Could the magnolia be too wet, rather than it being the compost/manure?

I put a Magnolia sieboldii in a place I thought was ok. It was not at
the lowest part of the garden. It seemed ok until we had a lot of heavy
rain (not sure I remember what that is!), when I noticed the ground on
one side of the plant was waterlogged. Seemed the clay was particularly
impervious there and it was acting as a dam. I dug a channel - and a few
months later a new path had land drains to remove the water. But then
Sod's Law ensured a prolonged dry spell, and it got too dry for too
long. It died about 2 years after I planted it.


Thanks Jeff, but I' pretty sure it's not too wet. Although the soil is
a heavy loam, I don't get puddles anywhere on the flowerbeds, even
after last night's heavy and much needed rain (stair-rods and T&L at
5AM). I think it too much of a coincidence that both the camellia and
the magnolia both had manure and both are now not happy.


I doubted it would be the cause. I see that it's not only "farmyard
manure" which might be a problem. Even Levingtons seems dodgy these days
(see Comments) :
http://sjsmallotments.co.uk/wp/aminopyralid-herbicide-in-manure-is-back/

--

Jeff


Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Contaminated Manure/compost glallotments Edible Gardening 2 08-08-2009 10:27 AM
contaminated manure Janet Tweedy United Kingdom 2 06-08-2009 10:14 PM
Aminopyralid herbicide contaminated manure in UK phorbin Edible Gardening 3 14-07-2008 11:41 PM
Bloody VERMIN Cats again, and again, and again, and again....:-(((( Mike United Kingdom 22 03-05-2005 12:59 PM
copper contaminated water gal Orchids 1 11-05-2003 04:45 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 06:35 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2019 GardenBanter.co.uk.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about Gardening"

 

Copyright © 2017