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Old 03-08-2019, 07:59 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Hedge Trimmer Selection

Hi all

Yes I know there are numerous "reviews" that can be Googled, but I am
hoping for relatively ubiased opinion from real world users.

Can people please recommend a suitable trimmer for a mixed hedge?
It comprises escallonia, cotoneaster, honey suckle, eleagnus and
ceanothus (with the odd photinia and viburnum birwoodi).

To date I have been coping/battling with a seriously old B & D jobbie.
But it is becoming increasingly unreliable and only has a 500mm blade.

I am quite happy to continue with a corded model and would certainly
prefer that to a heavy battery unit.

The hedge size is about 35m long x 2.4m high and clearly from the
constituent shrubs has "branches".
Ideally I would like a device that could be used to reduce the height,
but suspect that such an animal may be too heavy.
I am an aging office boy, so cutting this is quite an effort these days,
hence the weight consideration.

Not sure that this warrants a petrol driven item.



Thanks

Phil

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Old 03-08-2019, 11:44 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Hedge Trimmer Selection

On 03/08/2019 10:14, Chris Hogg wrote:
On Sat, 03 Aug 2019 07:59:39 +0100, thescullster
wrote:

Hi all

Yes I know there are numerous "reviews" that can be Googled, but I am
hoping for relatively ubiased opinion from real world users.

Can people please recommend a suitable trimmer for a mixed hedge?
It comprises escallonia, cotoneaster, honey suckle, eleagnus and
ceanothus (with the odd photinia and viburnum birwoodi).

To date I have been coping/battling with a seriously old B & D jobbie.
But it is becoming increasingly unreliable and only has a 500mm blade.

I am quite happy to continue with a corded model and would certainly
prefer that to a heavy battery unit.

The hedge size is about 35m long x 2.4m high and clearly from the
constituent shrubs has "branches".
Ideally I would like a device that could be used to reduce the height,
but suspect that such an animal may be too heavy.
I am an aging office boy, so cutting this is quite an effort these days,
hence the weight consideration.

Not sure that this warrants a petrol driven item.



I can't specifically recommend any particular make, but I would be
wary of hedge trimmers with shaft extensions intended for cutting the
tops of highish hedges, that are advertised by comely wenches of
lightweight stature as if they were featherweight and easy to operate.
IME they are neither, and if you need height to cut the top of your
hedge, either use steps or a ladder or if you're not happy wobbling
around up there, get a man in.


Thanks Chris

Yes I think I know exactly the advert you are referring to. Can't
imagine why it sticks in the mind so well.

I'm still OK doing the ladder wobble, but need more reach/a longer blade
really.

Phil



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Old 04-08-2019, 03:51 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Hedge Trimmer Selection

On 03/08/2019 10:14, Chris Hogg wrote:
On Sat, 03 Aug 2019 07:59:39 +0100, thescullster
wrote:

Hi all

Yes I know there are numerous "reviews" that can be Googled, but I am
hoping for relatively ubiased opinion from real world users.

Can people please recommend a suitable trimmer for a mixed hedge?
It comprises escallonia, cotoneaster, honey suckle, eleagnus and
ceanothus (with the odd photinia and viburnum birwoodi).

To date I have been coping/battling with a seriously old B & D jobbie.
But it is becoming increasingly unreliable and only has a 500mm blade.

I am quite happy to continue with a corded model and would certainly
prefer that to a heavy battery unit.

The hedge size is about 35m long x 2.4m high and clearly from the
constituent shrubs has "branches".
Ideally I would like a device that could be used to reduce the height,
but suspect that such an animal may be too heavy.
I am an aging office boy, so cutting this is quite an effort these days,
hence the weight consideration.

Not sure that this warrants a petrol driven item.



I can't specifically recommend any particular make, but I would be
wary of hedge trimmers with shaft extensions intended for cutting the
tops of highish hedges, that are advertised by comely wenches of
lightweight stature as if they were featherweight and easy to operate.
IME they are neither, and if you need height to cut the top of your
hedge, either use steps or a ladder or if you're not happy wobbling
around up there, get a man in.

You are not wrong! my son has all the kit and does hedges for a living
but he will soon have to stop due to the damage it is doing to his
shoulders and neck and he is only in his 30's no chance for me so I
rather gallantly allow him to cut my hedges.

--
Charlie Pridham
Gardening in Cornwall
www.roselandhouse.co.uk
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Old 04-08-2019, 04:08 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Posts: 190
Default Hedge Trimmer Selection

On 03/08/2019 07:59, thescullster wrote:
Hi all

Yes I know there are numerous "reviews" that can be Googled, but I am
hoping for relatively ubiased opinion from real world users.

Can people please recommend a suitable trimmer for a mixed hedge?
It comprises escallonia, cotoneaster, honey suckle, eleagnus and
ceanothus (with the odd photinia and viburnum birwoodi).

To date I have been coping/battling with a seriously old B & D jobbie.
But it is becoming increasingly unreliable and only has a 500mm blade.


When I have used a B&D it lasted less than a year. Sometimes didn't even
finish the job I started with it. I have a Bosch 600mm with 26mm cut.

The predecessor of this one I think:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Bosch-Elect...dp/B00B1RBG36/

I am quite happy to continue with a corded model and would certainly
prefer that to a heavy battery unit.


I have never found a battery one any good at all. OK for trimming light
growth off but anything more than that they are a waste of time. YMMV

The hedge size is about 35m long x 2.4m high and clearly from the
constituent shrubs has "branches".


I have slightly more hedge to cut than that in Beech, Holly, Privet,
Cotoneaster and Lonicera.
I also have a hefty pair of long handled loppers for the thickest
things that the hedge trimmer cannot get.

Ideally I would like a device that could be used to reduce the height,
but suspect that such an animal may be too heavy.
I am an aging office boy, so cutting this is quite an effort these days,
hence the weight consideration.

Not sure that this warrants a petrol driven item.


I'd stay with electric if you have it available. Just use an ELCB since
there is always a risk that you will cut through the cable one day.

--
Regards,
Martin Brown
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Old 04-08-2019, 04:31 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Hedge Trimmer Selection

Martin Brown wrote:

Not sure that this warrants a petrol driven item.


I'd stay with electric if you have it available. Just use an ELCB since
there is always a risk that you will cut through the cable one day.

An ELCB?! They went out with the ark. It's an RCD now, and it *is*
different from an ELCB though it does a similar job.

--
Chris Green
·


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Old 04-08-2019, 05:38 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Hedge Trimmer Selection

On 04/08/2019 16:31, Chris Green wrote:
Martin Brown wrote:

Not sure that this warrants a petrol driven item.


I'd stay with electric if you have it available. Just use an ELCB since
there is always a risk that you will cut through the cable one day.

An ELCB?! They went out with the ark. It's an RCD now, and it *is*
different from an ELCB though it does a similar job.

I use a Stihl strimmer with the hedge cutter atachment. It gets heavier
each year but I cut till my arms ache then clear up then cut again, not
as fast as I was but I just turned 77 a couple of days ago.
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Old 05-08-2019, 07:48 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Hedge Trimmer Selection

On 03/08/2019 07:59, thescullster wrote:
Hi all

Yes I know there are numerous "reviews" that can be Googled, but I am
hoping for relatively ubiased opinion from real world users.

Can people please recommend a suitable trimmer for a mixed hedge?
It comprises escallonia, cotoneaster, honey suckle, eleagnus and
ceanothus (with the odd photinia and viburnum birwoodi).

To date I have been coping/battling with a seriously old B & D jobbie.
But it is becoming increasingly unreliable and only has a 500mm blade.

I am quite happy to continue with a corded model and would certainly
prefer that to a heavy battery unit.

The hedge size is about 35m long x 2.4m high and clearly from the
constituent shrubs has "branches".
Ideally I would like a device that could be used to reduce the height,
but suspect that such an animal may be too heavy.
I am an aging office boy, so cutting this is quite an effort these days,
hence the weight consideration.

Not sure that this warrants a petrol driven item.


Often the way to reduce the height of a hedge is to first get in there
with a pruning saw or loppers and to cut/remove any thick branches to
height below that you want to maintain. Any new growth will then be soft
and a lighter weight trimmer could then be used at regular intervals to
maintain it.

--
mailto : news {at} admac {dot} myzen {dot} co {dot} uk
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Old 05-08-2019, 06:31 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Hedge Trimmer Selection

On Sat, 03 Aug 2019 07:59:39 +0100, thescullster wrote:

Hi all

Yes I know there are numerous "reviews" that can be Googled, but I am
hoping for relatively ubiased opinion from real world users.

Can people please recommend a suitable trimmer for a mixed hedge?
It comprises escallonia, cotoneaster, honey suckle, eleagnus and
ceanothus (with the odd photinia and viburnum birwoodi).

To date I have been coping/battling with a seriously old B & D jobbie.
But it is becoming increasingly unreliable and only has a 500mm blade.

I am quite happy to continue with a corded model and would certainly
prefer that to a heavy battery unit.


It depends on how much you want to spend really and if you go for an
expensive one are you prepared to put in the time and effort to keep the
blades sharp and 'de-gunged'.

I have happily bought 60cm blade length trimmers from the likes of
'Champion'brand and Screwfix. They have cost me around £30 -£35 a time
and if I get 3 seasons heavy usage out of them I'm happy at a cost of £10/
year.



--
Ermin
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Old 08-08-2019, 03:38 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Hedge Trimmer Selection

On Sat, 03 Aug 2019 07:59:39 +0100, thescullster wrote:

Hi all

Yes I know there are numerous "reviews" that can be Googled, but I am
hoping for relatively ubiased opinion from real world users.

Can people please recommend a suitable trimmer for a mixed hedge?
It comprises escallonia, cotoneaster, honey suckle, eleagnus and
ceanothus (with the odd photinia and viburnum birwoodi).

To date I have been coping/battling with a seriously old B & D jobbie.
But it is becoming increasingly unreliable and only has a 500mm blade.

I am quite happy to continue with a corded model and would certainly
prefer that to a heavy battery unit.

The hedge size is about 35m long x 2.4m high and clearly from the
constituent shrubs has "branches".
Ideally I would like a device that could be used to reduce the height,
but suspect that such an animal may be too heavy.
I am an aging office boy, so cutting this is quite an effort these days,
hence the weight consideration.

Not sure that this warrants a petrol driven item.


My old (ancient) B&D chainsaw had a hedge trimming attachment which was a
coarse comb which bolted to the blade (if that is the right term) to stop
branches whipping about too much.

It was very good at reducing the height and width of hedges so that a
lightweight trimmer could be used for maintenance.

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/McCulloch...ttachment-for-
MAC12-MAC120-Chainsaw/382890671469?hash=item59260ffd6d:g:2cIAAOSwi5dcqzt 1

is the nearest I can find with a quick search.

You do, of course, need a chainsaw!


Cheers



Dave R


--
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Old 22-08-2019, 12:15 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Hedge Trimmer Selection

On 03/08/2019 07:59, thescullster wrote:
Yes I know there are numerous "reviews" that can be Googled, but I am
hoping for relatively ubiased opinion from real world users.
Can people please recommend a suitable trimmer for a mixed hedge?


Scullster! I am late to this thread. Did you make a decision on a new
hedgetrimmer?

I wanted to second everything that Martin has written below: I've added
a couple more comments below his response

In article ,
Martin Brown wrote:

When I have used a B&D it lasted less than a year. Sometimes didn't even
finish the job I started with it. I have a Bosch 600mm with 26mm cut.

The predecessor of this one I think:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Bosch-Elect...dp/B00B1RBG36/

I am quite happy to continue with a corded model and would certainly
prefer that to a heavy battery unit.


I have never found a battery one any good at all. OK for trimming light
growth off but anything more than that they are a waste of time. YMMV

The hedge size is about 35m long x 2.4m high and clearly from the
constituent shrubs has "branches".


I have slightly more hedge to cut than that in Beech, Holly, Privet,
Cotoneaster and Lonicera.
I also have a hefty pair of long handled loppers for the thickest
things that the hedge trimmer cannot get.

Ideally I would like a device that could be used to reduce the height,
but suspect that such an animal may be too heavy.
I am an aging office boy, so cutting this is quite an effort these days,
hence the weight consideration.

Not sure that this warrants a petrol driven item.


I'd stay with electric if you have it available. Just use an ELCB since
there is always a risk that you will cut through the cable one day.


Further comments from me:

- I am on my second Bosch AHS 55-26 (55cm long, 26mm between teeth).
This suits me (with *loads* of hedge) very well. (I can't stand petrol
driven garden machinery).

- Yes, you will cut through the cable, especially with this long blade.
But you get better at avoiding that.

- I have two other hedgetrimmers, battery driven (bought in the last
couple of years). They're excellent for keep the untidiness down during
summer. But ...

- for the serious hedge cutting (as opposed to trimming), my AHS 55-26
is fantastic. Not only very powerful, but the long blade cuts a hedge
*much* more quickly, and indeed more neatly.

- These days, a bout of hedgecutting finishes me for the day (back).
OTOH, painful though that is, it's bloody good work-out :-)

Best wishes
John


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