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Old 10-10-2019, 04:49 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Indoor Hyacinth's

I bought and planted up my indoor hyacinth's a couple of weeks
ago. At the time the garden centre gave me a paper about
growing them indoors.

Well, today I read it, and found according to them I've been
doing it wrong for the last 50+ years!

I am supposed to plant then in pots with drain holes, where as
I've always used (mainly plastic) pots and never seemed to have
any problems.

Why? Is this a new fad, some one not knowing what they are
doing, or a sales ploy to sell more pot?

--
Roger T

700 ft up in Mid-Wales

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Old 10-10-2019, 05:37 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Indoor Hyacinth's

On Thu, 10 Oct 2019 16:49:44 +0100, Roger Tonkin
wrote:

I bought and planted up my indoor hyacinth's a couple of weeks
ago. At the time the garden centre gave me a paper about
growing them indoors.

Well, today I read it, and found according to them I've been
doing it wrong for the last 50+ years!

I am supposed to plant then in pots with drain holes, where as
I've always used (mainly plastic) pots and never seemed to have
any problems.

Why? Is this a new fad, some one not knowing what they are
doing, or a sales ploy to sell more pot?


Like many things, the right way to do anything is if it works, and the
wrong way is if it doesn't.

I guess growing hyacinths in pots with drain holes works perfectly
well, but so does growing them in a hyacinth vase with the water just
below or touching the base of the bulb, which is probably in effect
very similar to what you do but without any compost.
http://tinyurl.com/y5rwodyv No drainage there!

--

Chris

Gardening in West Cornwall, looking E, Sheltered and partially shaded by trees to the W and SW
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Old 10-10-2019, 05:52 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Indoor Hyacinth's

On 10/10/2019 16:49, Roger Tonkin wrote:
I bought and planted up my indoor hyacinth's a couple of weeks
ago. At the time the garden centre gave me a paper about
growing them indoors.

Well, today I read it, and found according to them I've been
doing it wrong for the last 50+ years!

I am supposed to plant then in pots with drain holes, where as
I've always used (mainly plastic) pots and never seemed to have
any problems.


It actually doesn't make much difference provided that you don't over
water them to the point of inducing bulb rot. Main problem I have is
that squirrels break in and eat them sometimes.

A bit like with a prepared amyrillis bulb everything the plant needs for
a flower this year is already in the bulb. Letting the leave die down
naturally and planting them outside afterwords works for me. Most of
them flower for a few years in the garden before squirrels dig them up.

Why? Is this a new fad, some one not knowing what they are
doing, or a sales ploy to sell more pot?


To sell more pots at a bigger margin would be my guess.

--
Regards,
Martin Brown
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Old 11-10-2019, 11:46 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Indoor Hyacinth's

In article ,
says...

On Thu, 10 Oct 2019 16:49:44 +0100, Roger Tonkin
wrote:

I bought and planted up my indoor hyacinth's a couple of weeks
ago. At the time the garden centre gave me a paper about
growing them indoors.

Well, today I read it, and found according to them I've been
doing it wrong for the last 50+ years!

I am supposed to plant then in pots with drain holes, where as
I've always used (mainly plastic) pots and never seemed to have
any problems.

Why? Is this a new fad, some one not knowing what they are
doing, or a sales ploy to sell more pot?


Like many things, the right way to do anything is if it works, and the
wrong way is if it doesn't.

I guess growing hyacinths in pots with drain holes works perfectly
well, but so does growing them in a hyacinth vase with the water just
below or touching the base of the bulb, which is probably in effect
very similar to what you do but without any compost.
http://tinyurl.com/y5rwodyv No drainage there!

I do grow one like that it a glass. Always quite effective for
the grandchildren to learn about how things grow!

The rest are in plastic or ceramic pots, with bulb fibre, in a
drawer in the garage as usual.

Another amusing thing last year when I asked in a local
garden/pet shop about bulb fibre, they did not have any" BUT
they had bulb compost! Got it n the garden centre this year.

--
Roger T

700 ft up in Mid-Wales


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