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Old 12-04-2020, 03:15 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Old seeds

Just noting that whilst I was waiting for my order of seeds to turn up, I
planted some Yellow Courgette seeds (4 or 5) packed for 2018, use by end
2019, packet opened in 2018 (I think).
Waste not want not, etc.
Much to my surprise one has germinated.

So don't necessarily chuck away old seeds.
They might grow.
Just don't rely on them.

Cheers


Dave R



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Old 12-04-2020, 05:01 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Old seeds

In article ,
David wrote:
Just noting that whilst I was waiting for my order of seeds to turn up, I
planted some Yellow Courgette seeds (4 or 5) packed for 2018, use by end
2019, packet opened in 2018 (I think).
Waste not want not, etc.
Much to my surprise one has germinated.

So don't necessarily chuck away old seeds.
They might grow.
Just don't rely on them.


Most cucurbit seeds keep perfectly well for several years, often a
decade, depending on the species and conditions. I regularly plant
ones of 3 years old, and get better rates than that - but I do keep
mine in an old ammunition box in a fairly cool and dry garage.

Most pea and bean seeds keep even longer. Cruciferae seeds do fairly
well, but umbelliferae don't - generally.


Regards,
Nick Maclaren.
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Old 12-04-2020, 07:25 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Old seeds

In article ,
Roger Tonkin wrote:

I've planted some Broad Bean seeds from last year and so
supposedly in date! Germination rate seems about 50% at the
moment, over a month after planting directly in the soild, with
plastic cloche covering.


I soak them overnight, pre-germinate them until the root shows on
damp kitchen roll in a pie dish, under cling film, which gives a
fairly good indication of viability rate. If I don't do that, I get
dire results because there is something in my soil that lurves
germinating beans. French and runner beans I do that first, and then
get them established in paper pots (ones I make), because they are
even more susceptible.

It sounds tedious, but is far less so than having to deal with 50%
(or, worse, 5%!) emergence rate.


Regards,
Nick Maclaren.
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Old 14-04-2020, 10:08 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Old seeds

On 12/04/2020 18:25, Nick Maclaren wrote:
In article ,
Roger Tonkin wrote:

I've planted some Broad Bean seeds from last year and so
supposedly in date! Germination rate seems about 50% at the
moment, over a month after planting directly in the soild, with
plastic cloche covering.


That is disappointing they generally come up pretty quickly and keep for
several (many?) years if you keep them cool and dry. I buy fresh about
every third year sometimes discounted at end of season. Never had much
bother with germination. Plenty with rabbits and rodents though.

I soak them overnight, pre-germinate them until the root shows on
damp kitchen roll in a pie dish, under cling film, which gives a
fairly good indication of viability rate. If I don't do that, I get
dire results because there is something in my soil that lurves
germinating beans. French and runner beans I do that first, and then
get them established in paper pots (ones I make), because they are
even more susceptible.


I might give that a try on some of my old bean seeds that haven't come
up this year. I was about to consign them to the compost heap. Newer
seeds germinated within a few days so they must be borderline.

It sounds tedious, but is far less so than having to deal with 50%
(or, worse, 5%!) emergence rate.


Good idea! Thanks...

One of the varieties I would quite like to grow so I'll give it a try.

I think the trick to keeping seeds long term is somewhere cool and dry
with a fairly steady temperature. Even carrot seed lasts a few years.
(which surprised me a bit)

--
Regards,
Martin Brown


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