Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1   Report Post  
Old 26-05-2020, 06:23 PM
Registered User
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Jan 2018
Posts: 9
Default Tree ID help for a found branch?!

Hello to all, I posted two years ago about another tree identification and you were all wonderful! You identified the tree I had seen and I was so happy to learn something new.

I have another mystery (to me). In my local woods I found a section of broken branch and I brought it home in hopes of making a hiking stick from it.

The location was a wooded area in Leytonstone, East London, the woods being part of Epping Forest.

It's a long, slim branch very straight, about 2cm (1 inch) in diameter.

The colour is a light fawn brown, and there are small round whorls dotted about the bark, looking almost like leopard spots, and inbetween these are light veiny looking protrusions running vertically.

I think it was a branch, not the actual tree, but I can't be sure as it was lying broken on the ground when I came across it. I looked around but couldn't find a tree that it would have been from, couldn't find a tree missing it's branch, so I don't know where it came from and which tree it belonged to. It still has a green underskin visible in the broken place, and the inside is a soft, milky white core.

I've looked around online for myself but can't find anything that shows young branch bark only mature tree barks. Any help would be wonderful.

I have posted the image he
https://i.postimg.cc/sgvDJcpG/IMG-5037.jpg

  #2   Report Post  
Old 27-05-2020, 10:25 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Jul 2006
Posts: 1,810
Default Tree ID help for a found branch?!

On 27/05/2020 07:46, Chris Hogg wrote:
On Tue, 26 May 2020 18:23:03 +0100, Breeze
wrote:


Hello to all, I posted two years ago about another tree identification
and you were all wonderful! You identified the tree I had seen and I was
so happy to learn something new.

I have another mystery (to me). In my local woods I found a section of
broken branch and I brought it home in hopes of making a hiking stick
from it.


snipped details

I have posted the image he
http://tinyurl.com/y7xb7olq


I don't know the answer, but if it has a soft milky white core, that
suggests to me it's not a woody tree as such but possibly a fast
growing shrub or perennial.


Try Sambucus nigra (elder, elderberry), which is soft-cored, and whose
young branches look rather like this.

--
SRH
  #3   Report Post  
Old 27-05-2020, 11:00 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Jun 2016
Posts: 71
Default Tree ID help for a found branch?!

Stewart Robert Hinsley wrote:
I have posted the image he
http://tinyurl.com/y7xb7olq


I don't know the answer, but if it has a soft milky white core, that
suggests to me it's not a woody tree as such but possibly a fast
growing shrub or perennial.


Try Sambucus nigra (elder, elderberry), which is soft-cored, and whose
young branches look rather like this.

Yes, I was going to suggest that earlier and having taken a look at
the picture I'd say it's almost certainly elder.

To the OP it won't make a very good stick for anything, elder isn't
very good wood for strength or toughness.

--
Chris Green
·
  #4   Report Post  
Old 27-05-2020, 11:03 AM
Registered User
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Jan 2018
Posts: 9
Default

Thanks Chris, I will check that out. Could the white core be because it's a sapling or a branch? I'm going back to the spot today to investigate more about the place I found it, see what other trees and shrubs are there.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris Hogg View Post
On Wed, 27 May 2020 07:46:21 +0100, Chris Hogg wrote:

On Tue, 26 May 2020 18:23:03 +0100, Breeze
EMOVE wrote:


Hello to all, I posted two years ago about another tree identification
and you were all wonderful! You identified the tree I had seen and I was
so happy to learn something new.

I have another mystery (to me). In my local woods I found a section of
broken branch and I brought it home in hopes of making a hiking stick
from it.


snipped details

I have posted the image he
http://tinyurl.com/y7xb7olq

I don't know the answer, but if it has a soft milky white core, that
suggests to me it's not a woody tree as such but possibly a fast
growing shrub or perennial.


PS: you may find something here tree identification | bark identification but
I couldn't immediately see yours. (There are four pages of tree barks
on that site, see the list at the top.) Some dogwoods and maples have
those striations running up the stems, e.g.
https://tinyurl.com/ybqjzdfq.

--

Chris

Gardening in West Cornwall, very mild, sheltered
from the West, but open to the North and East.
  #5   Report Post  
Old 27-05-2020, 11:59 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Oct 2015
Posts: 590
Default Tree ID help for a found branch?!

In article , Chris Green wrote:

To the OP it won't make a very good stick for anything, elder isn't
very good wood for strength or toughness.


You might be surprised. Young elder isn't, for sure, but it gets
remarkably different as it ages. However, we aren't talking about
a couple of years here, but probably a decade or more.


Regards,
Nick Maclaren.


  #6   Report Post  
Old 27-05-2020, 08:25 PM
Registered User
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Jan 2018
Posts: 9
Default

Hi Stewart - I do believe that's it, it's elder!!

Thank you so much; I took a look online and it seems to be that. It appears this is a young stem; I managed to find some images that match the look.

Pity about not being strong enough for a good walking stick!




Quote:
Originally Posted by Stewart Robert Hinsley View Post
On 27/05/2020 07:46, Chris Hogg wrote:
On Tue, 26 May 2020 18:23:03 +0100, Breeze
EMOVE wrote:


Hello to all, I posted two years ago about another tree identification
and you were all wonderful! You identified the tree I had seen and I was
so happy to learn something new.

I have another mystery (to me). In my local woods I found a section of
broken branch and I brought it home in hopes of making a hiking stick
from it.


snipped details

I have posted the image he
http://tinyurl.com/y7xb7olq

I don't know the answer, but if it has a soft milky white core, that
suggests to me it's not a woody tree as such but possibly a fast
growing shrub or perennial.


Try Sambucus nigra (elder, elderberry), which is soft-cored, and whose
young branches look rather like this.

--
SRH
  #7   Report Post  
Old 27-05-2020, 08:38 PM
Registered User
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Jan 2018
Posts: 9
Default

Thanks Nick - seems I have a long wait for my found object to make a stronger hiking stick, lol!

Thanks everyone for the input. I went back to the spot today and after looking along the path I found this, I saw the little tree it had torn off from, and the actual tree bark is quite different from this stem, but the torn place matches the stem so I think I've found the tree - the leaves do look like elder leaf images online.

Thanks so much everyone for identifying this for me!

  #8   Report Post  
Old 27-05-2020, 08:52 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Jun 2016
Posts: 71
Default Tree ID help for a found branch?!

Nick Maclaren wrote:
In article , Chris Green wrote:

To the OP it won't make a very good stick for anything, elder isn't
very good wood for strength or toughness.


You might be surprised. Young elder isn't, for sure, but it gets
remarkably different as it ages. However, we aren't talking about
a couple of years here, but probably a decade or more.

Old elder isn't much better, very brittle and it disintegrates rapidly
when dead too. You simply don't get old, dried out chunks of elder.
(we have a lot of elder around our land and I see how it compares with
such as Leylandii, Oak, Ash, Poplar etc.)

--
Chris Green
·
  #9   Report Post  
Old 30-05-2020, 05:30 PM
Registered User
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Jan 2018
Posts: 9
Post

Oh that's a shame it will never make a good stick for rambles. Maybe it will have to just be decorative at home; this younger bark is so nice looking.

I'm glad to have learned a new tree though (I really don't know as many by heart as I'd like to) - I've now been identifying other elders in the woods and quite proud of myself, lol!

Thank you all for your help; it's great to come to where the experts are.



Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
What is this fruit(?) found last week under these plants found in aSouthern CA(lifornia) rural home area? Ant Gardening 9 23-11-2017 09:07 AM
Broken branch on nectarine tree - will they ripen? Richard Sherratt Australia 14 08-02-2004 07:26 PM
Large branch fell of ash tree Snowman United Kingdom 7 25-07-2003 10:02 PM
Apple tree leaves dying, whole branch Ken Gardening 1 02-06-2003 01:44 AM
How do I grow a tree from a branch? Tumbleweed United Kingdom 16 16-05-2003 10:44 AM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 08:56 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2021, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2021 GardenBanter.co.uk.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about Gardening"

 

Copyright © 2017