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Old 28-05-2020, 01:48 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Last year's (still bagged) compost

I (think I) know that over time the nutrient level in bagged compost
reduces.

Is there any reason not to use up last year's still bagged compost if you
add more nutrients?


Cheers



Dave R



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Old 28-05-2020, 04:43 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Last year's (still bagged) compost

In article ,
David wrote:
I (think I) know that over time the nutrient level in bagged compost
reduces.

Is there any reason not to use up last year's still bagged compost if you
add more nutrients?


Or without bothering to do that! Most nutrients do NOT reduce with
time, and the only one I can think of that would is nitrogen, and
then only if the compost has been kept damp. I regularly use such
things 5 and more years old, without trouble and without adding
anything (at least for a short period).


Regards,
Nick Maclaren.
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Old 28-05-2020, 07:03 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Last year's (still bagged) compost

On 28/05/20 16:43, Nick Maclaren wrote:
In article ,
David wrote:
I (think I) know that over time the nutrient level in bagged compost
reduces.

Is there any reason not to use up last year's still bagged compost if you
add more nutrients?


Or without bothering to do that! Most nutrients do NOT reduce with
time, and the only one I can think of that would is nitrogen, and
then only if the compost has been kept damp. I regularly use such
things 5 and more years old, without trouble and without adding
anything (at least for a short period).


+1

Anyone know where the OP's assumption might have come from? Has it ever
appeared on the bags themselves as a sort of shelf life?

--

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Old 28-05-2020, 10:33 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Last year's (still bagged) compost

In article ,
Jeff Layman wrote:
On 28/05/20 16:43, Nick Maclaren wrote:
In article ,
David wrote:
I (think I) know that over time the nutrient level in bagged compost
reduces.

Is there any reason not to use up last year's still bagged compost if you
add more nutrients?


Or without bothering to do that! Most nutrients do NOT reduce with
time, and the only one I can think of that would is nitrogen, and
then only if the compost has been kept damp. I regularly use such
things 5 and more years old, without trouble and without adding
anything (at least for a short period).


+1

Anyone know where the OP's assumption might have come from? Has it ever
appeared on the bags themselves as a sort of shelf life?


Dunno, but I once saw a 'use by' date on a packet of salt :-)


Regards,
Nick Maclaren.
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Old 28-05-2020, 11:16 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Last year's (still bagged) compost

On 28/05/2020 22:33, Nick Maclaren wrote:
In article ,
Jeff Layman wrote:
On 28/05/20 16:43, Nick Maclaren wrote:
In article ,
David wrote:
I (think I) know that over time the nutrient level in bagged compost
reduces.

Is there any reason not to use up last year's still bagged compost if you
add more nutrients?

Or without bothering to do that! Most nutrients do NOT reduce with
time, and the only one I can think of that would is nitrogen, and
then only if the compost has been kept damp. I regularly use such
things 5 and more years old, without trouble and without adding
anything (at least for a short period).


+1

Anyone know where the OP's assumption might have come from? Has it ever
appeared on the bags themselves as a sort of shelf life?


Dunno, but I once saw a 'use by' date on a packet of salt :-)


Regards,
Nick Maclaren.

I wont forget seeing a best before date on angle grinder curtting discs


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Old 29-05-2020, 08:30 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Last year's (still bagged) compost

On 28/05/20 22:33, Nick Maclaren wrote:
In article ,
Jeff Layman wrote:
On 28/05/20 16:43, Nick Maclaren wrote:
In article ,
David wrote:
I (think I) know that over time the nutrient level in bagged compost
reduces.

Is there any reason not to use up last year's still bagged compost if you
add more nutrients?

Or without bothering to do that! Most nutrients do NOT reduce with
time, and the only one I can think of that would is nitrogen, and
then only if the compost has been kept damp. I regularly use such
things 5 and more years old, without trouble and without adding
anything (at least for a short period).


+1

Anyone know where the OP's assumption might have come from? Has it ever
appeared on the bags themselves as a sort of shelf life?


Dunno, but I once saw a 'use by' date on a packet of salt :-)


Possibly relating to the effectiveness of the anti-caking agent wearing
off? I can't think of any other sensible explanation.

--

Jeff
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Old 29-05-2020, 08:32 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Last year's (still bagged) compost

On 28/05/20 23:16, David Hill wrote:
On 28/05/2020 22:33, Nick Maclaren wrote:
In article ,
Jeff Layman wrote:
On 28/05/20 16:43, Nick Maclaren wrote:
In article ,
David wrote:
I (think I) know that over time the nutrient level in bagged compost
reduces.

Is there any reason not to use up last year's still bagged compost if you
add more nutrients?

Or without bothering to do that! Most nutrients do NOT reduce with
time, and the only one I can think of that would is nitrogen, and
then only if the compost has been kept damp. I regularly use such
things 5 and more years old, without trouble and without adding
anything (at least for a short period).

+1

Anyone know where the OP's assumption might have come from? Has it ever
appeared on the bags themselves as a sort of shelf life?


Dunno, but I once saw a 'use by' date on a packet of salt :-)


Regards,
Nick Maclaren.

I wont forget seeing a best before date on angle grinder curtting discs


https://toolguyd.com/cut-off-grinding-wheel-expiration/

--

Jeff
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Old 29-05-2020, 08:41 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Last year's (still bagged) compost

On 28/05/2020 22:33, Nick Maclaren wrote:
In article ,
Jeff Layman wrote:
On 28/05/20 16:43, Nick Maclaren wrote:
In article ,
David wrote:
I (think I) know that over time the nutrient level in bagged compost
reduces.

Is there any reason not to use up last year's still bagged compost if you
add more nutrients?

Or without bothering to do that! Most nutrients do NOT reduce with
time, and the only one I can think of that would is nitrogen, and
then only if the compost has been kept damp. I regularly use such
things 5 and more years old, without trouble and without adding
anything (at least for a short period).


+1

Anyone know where the OP's assumption might have come from? Has it ever
appeared on the bags themselves as a sort of shelf life?


Dunno, but I once saw a 'use by' date on a packet of salt :-)


That one isn't quite as daft as it sounds. Table salt has some modifiers
in it to encourage free running even in our damp climate. It will
eventually set like a rock if you leave it on the shelf for too long.

OTOH Rock salt that you grind before use has not such limitations.

--
Regards,
Martin Brown
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Old 29-05-2020, 12:23 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Last year's (still bagged) compost

In article ,
Martin Brown wrote:

Dunno, but I once saw a 'use by' date on a packet of salt :-)


That one isn't quite as daft as it sounds. Table salt has some modifiers
in it to encourage free running even in our damp climate. It will
eventually set like a rock if you leave it on the shelf for too long.


Only if your storage location is damp, and then the date is irrelevant,
because it won't last that long. In any case, just belt it with a
mallet or even a fist and it becomes usable again. The anti-caking
agent is magnesium carbonate, which doesn't go off, either.


Regards,
Nick Maclaren.
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Old 29-05-2020, 08:50 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Last year's (still bagged) compost

On Thu, 28 May 2020 19:03:38 +0100, Jeff Layman wrote:

On 28/05/20 16:43, Nick Maclaren wrote:
In article ,
David wrote:
I (think I) know that over time the nutrient level in bagged compost
reduces.

Is there any reason not to use up last year's still bagged compost if
you add more nutrients?


Or without bothering to do that! Most nutrients do NOT reduce with
time, and the only one I can think of that would is nitrogen, and then
only if the compost has been kept damp. I regularly use such things 5
and more years old, without trouble and without adding anything (at
least for a short period).


+1

Anyone know where the OP's assumption might have come from? Has it ever
appeared on the bags themselves as a sort of shelf life?


LOst in history.
Could have been Which? or some similar publication.
https://www.which.co.uk/news/2015/10...-for-your-old-
compost-419348/

"Remember to use up any unused or part-used bags. Compost stored for a
long time, especially if it has got too hot or too wet, will start to
break down in the bags and the fertiliser in the compost could be
released. If this happens your new, young plants may be harmed by acidic
conditions. "

So not sure if I agree, but there are views out there.

Interesting discussion he
https://chat.allotment-garden.org/index.php?topic=53141.0

"As a retailer of compost please may I make a point here. We have to buy
a minimum of seven pallets at a time which is 65 bags per pallet. We have
to put in our order in October for the next year so it is a common
practice to sell 'old' bags as there is no 'sell by dates' on compost."

The main view seems to be that after a time the fertilizer (slow release?)
may get released into the compost and make it too strong for seeds and
cuttings.


Cheers



Dave r




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