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Old 26-06-2020, 06:09 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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I have 15 trees planted this year, and rather than spending 2 hours
travelling and 1 hour watering them every day or so, want to set up some
irrigation for them, I had initially thought of soaker hose but probably
some form of dripline would be better.

Does the pipe come with perforations at regular intervals, or do you
have to pierce it where you want? Is there a general standard or do
they all vary per manufacturer. Should you try to adjust it to a
low/constant rate or control it on a timer?



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Old 26-06-2020, 06:52 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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On 26/06/20 18:09, Andy Burns wrote:
I have 15 trees planted this year, and rather than spending 2 hours
travelling and 1 hour watering them every day or so, want to set up some
irrigation for them, I had initially thought of soaker hose but probably
some form of dripline would be better.

Does the pipe come with perforations at regular intervals, or do you
have to pierce it where you want? Is there a general standard or do
they all vary per manufacturer. Should you try to adjust it to a
low/constant rate or control it on a timer?


I've never used drip-line where the piping has holes along its length.
So if that's what you are definitely using, stop reading now! But I've
used the other type, where you put drip-heads in, a number of times.

In my experience there were slight differences in the diameter of
Gardena and Hozelock tubing (6 and 6.5mm?), and the drip-heads of one
were a slight looser fit in the pipe of the other. I don't even know if
both are available now, and have no idea if the pipe available from eg
Amazon is any different from either. In any case, for each of the 15
trees I'd use two pieces of narrow pipe off a single length of wider
pipe. That's in case one of the drip-heads gets blocked, so you have a
spare. You get a small tool to make the right size hole in the wider
pipe. I would also tend to use the adjustable heads rather than the
fixed drip one, as IME the latter seemed to get blocked more often.

I would also use a timer. If you don't, and one or more of the tubes
comes loose, you are going to lose rather a lot of water until you fix
the leak! When you set it all up, if you try to do it all with narrow
pipe you will find that adjusting the drip heads will drive you mad, as
the more you open/close each one to get the right rate for that one the
more it affects all the others in the line! That is almost non-existent
using the wide tubing as a feeder for each of the narrow pipes.

--

Jeff
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Old 26-06-2020, 07:23 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Jeff Layman wrote:

I've never used drip-line where the piping has holes along its length.
So if that's what you are definitely using, stop reading now! But I've
used the other type, where you put drip-heads in, a number of times.

In my experience there were slight differences in the diameter of
Gardena and Hozelock tubing (6 and 6.5mm?), and the drip-heads of one
were a slight looser fit in the pipe of the other. I don't even know if
both are available now, and have no idea if the pipe available from eg
Amazon is any different from either. In any case, for each of the 15
trees I'd use two pieces of narrow pipe off a single length of wider
pipe. That's in case one of the drip-heads gets blocked, so you have a
spare. You get a small tool to make the right size hole in the wider
pipe. I would also tend to use the adjustable heads rather than the
fixed drip one, as IME the latter seemed to get blocked more often.

I would also use a timer. If you don't, and one or more of the tubes
comes loose, you are going to lose rather a lot of water until you fix
the leak! When you set it all up, if you try to do it all with narrow
pipe you will find that adjusting the drip heads will drive you mad, as
the more you open/close each one to get the right rate for that one the
more it affects all the others in the line! That is almost non-existent
using the wide tubing as a feeder for each of the narrow pipes.


Sounds like good advice.

I have bought various additional small and large pipes on Ebay,
and they have been satisfactory. I think they call the small ones
4mm, as that is the internal diameter, but make sure you don't
get the thinner wall material that some offer.

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham UK
@ChrisJDixon1

Plant amazing Acers.
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Old 28-06-2020, 07:08 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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On 26/06/2020 18:09, Andy Burns wrote:
I have 15 trees planted this year, and rather than spending 2 hours
travelling and 1 hour watering them every day or so, want to set up some
irrigation for them, I had initially thought of soaker hose but probably
some form of dripline would be better.

Does the pipe come with perforations at regular intervals, or do you
have to pierce it where you want?* Is there a general standard or do
they all vary per manufacturer.* Should you try to adjust it to a
low/constant rate or control it on a timer?



Take a look at LBS , you buy the pipe un-perferated and small drippers
are pushed into the pipe where ever you want them, there is a tool that
makes the holes, its all there in their catalogue

--
Charlie Pridham
Gardening in Cornwall
www.roselandhouse.co.uk
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Old 29-06-2020, 04:54 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Jeff Layman wrote:

I've never used drip-line where the piping has holes along its length.
So if that's what you are definitely using, stop reading now!


No, I wasn't sure if that was the only type with fixed 15cm or 30cm
spacing drippers, which would be pretty wasteful considering my tree
spacing.

But I've
used the other type, where you put drip-heads in, a number of times.

In my experience there were slight differences in the diameter of
Gardena and Hozelock tubing (6 and 6.5mm?), and the drip-heads of one
were a slight looser fit in the pipe of the other.


The various ones I'd looked at tried to imply their system required
their parts, but Claber implies compatibility with a lot of the other
names I'd seen

I think I can go with a 1/2" backbone and a tee off per tree to 1/4"
pipe with a couple of adjustable drippers.



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Old 29-06-2020, 04:56 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Charlie Pridham wrote:

Take a look at LBS , you buy the pipe un-perferated and small drippers
are pushed into the pipe where ever you want them


Thanks, just when I thought I'd go for Claber, more choices to delay me :-)

their prices look good, but several items are only for back-order ...


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