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Old 16-01-2021, 04:18 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Moss on Tarmac

What is the best treatment to remove moss from a fairly old rough tarmac
surface please?

Ta

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Old 16-01-2021, 04:26 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Moss on Tarmac

On 16/01/2021 16:18, Pwllgloyw wrote:
What is the best treatment to remove moss from a fairly old rough tarmac
surface please?

Ta

pressure washer


--
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conspirators see right wing conspiracies everywhere"
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Old 16-01-2021, 05:17 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Moss on Tarmac

On 16/01/2021 16:18, Pwllgloyw wrote:
What is the best treatment to remove moss from a fairly old rough tarmac
surface please?

Ta

Bleach and caustic soda mixed up in an old watering can.
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Old 16-01-2021, 07:27 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Moss on Tarmac

In article ,
Chris Hogg wrote:
On Sat, 16 Jan 2021 16:18:38 +0000, Pwllgloyw
wrote:

What is the best treatment to remove moss from a fairly old rough tarmac
surface please?


But if the tarmac is shaded and pitted and holds moisture, the moss
will eventually return whatever you do.


Actually, it will return if it grows there - end of story.

Be warned that caustic soda is EXTREMELY nasty stuff, and breathing
any or getting any in your eyes, mouth or nose will leave you with
damage that A&E cannot fix.

A pressure washer can seriously damage weak tarmac, and ferrous
sulphate can stain any concrete yellow, but those are minor by
comparison.


Regards,
Nick Maclaren.
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Old 16-01-2021, 09:45 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Moss on Tarmac

On 16/01/2021 19:27, Nick Maclaren wrote:
In article ,
Chris Hogg wrote:
On Sat, 16 Jan 2021 16:18:38 +0000, Pwllgloyw
wrote:

What is the best treatment to remove moss from a fairly old rough tarmac
surface please?


But if the tarmac is shaded and pitted and holds moisture, the moss
will eventually return whatever you do.


Actually, it will return if it grows there - end of story.

Be warned that caustic soda is EXTREMELY nasty stuff, and breathing
any or getting any in your eyes, mouth or nose will leave you with
damage that A&E cannot fix.

A pressure washer can seriously damage weak tarmac, and ferrous
sulphate can stain any concrete yellow, but those are minor by
comparison.


Regards,
Nick Maclaren.



BAC50 Benzalkonium Chloride
After lockdown it will probably return to its previous price of around
£25 for 5 litres. For moss a 10:1 or 20:1 dilution (water:bac50) is
probably sufficient.

During the first lockdown the price rose by x2 to x4 and fell back to
its previous level around month after the first lockdown. During this
lockdown the price is rising again.

https://www.ebay.co.uk/sch/i.html?_f...bac50&_sacat=0

Spay on using a pump up garden sprayer or use a watering can and leave
for a week or four to let it die.

https://job-prices.co.uk/best-moss-killer/

--
mailto : news {at} admac {dot} myzen {dot} co {dot} uk


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Old 17-01-2021, 10:45 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Moss on Tarmac

On Saturday, January 16, 2021 at 4:18:40 PM UTC, Pwllgloyw wrote:
What is the best treatment to remove moss from a fairly old rough tarmac
surface please?

Ta

Armillotox

Jonathan
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Old 17-01-2021, 12:46 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Moss on Tarmac

On 17/01/2021 10:45, Jonathan Ward wrote:
On Saturday, January 16, 2021 at 4:18:40 PM UTC, Pwllgloyw wrote:
What is the best treatment to remove moss from a fairly old rough tarmac
surface please?

Ta

Armillotox

Jonathan

thats for fungus, not moss.


--
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H.L. Mencken, A Mencken Chrestomathy
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Old 17-01-2021, 02:38 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Moss on Tarmac

On 17/01/2021 12:46, The Natural Philosopher wrote:
On 17/01/2021 10:45, Jonathan Ward wrote:
On Saturday, January 16, 2021 at 4:18:40 PM UTC, Pwllgloyw wrote:
What is the best treatment to remove moss from a fairly old rough tarmac
surface please?

Ta

Armillotox

Jonathan

thats for fungus, not moss.


It's for neither. It lost its approval for use as a fungicide 17 years
ago! It can still be used as a disinfectant, and if it got spilt by
accident on some fungus or other...

--

Jeff
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Old 17-01-2021, 04:54 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Moss on Tarmac

On 17/01/2021 15:41, Chris Hogg wrote:
On Sun, 17 Jan 2021 14:38:15 +0000, Jeff Layman
wrote:

On 17/01/2021 12:46, The Natural Philosopher wrote:
On 17/01/2021 10:45, Jonathan Ward wrote:
On Saturday, January 16, 2021 at 4:18:40 PM UTC, Pwllgloyw wrote:
What is the best treatment to remove moss from a fairly old rough tarmac
surface please?

Ta
Armillotox

Jonathan

thats for fungus, not moss.


It's for neither. It lost its approval for use as a fungicide 17 years
ago! It can still be used as a disinfectant, and if it got spilt by
accident on some fungus or other...


In days of yore, wasn't armillatox the same as Jeyes fluid but just
under a different name for marketing purposes?


While some products have been re-formulated over the past decade or so
it may be that the manufactures are no longer able to claim their
product is for certain usages.

From the Jeyes Fluid FAQ or product description

Regrettably, as this product is now subject to Ministry regulations, we
are unable at present, to confirm recommendations other than those
printed on the latest can.

Since EC Regulations in 2003, the product is no longer effective at
sterilising soil.

Since EC Regulations in 2003, the product is no longer effective as a
winter wash.

Since EC Regulations in 2003, the product is no longer effective against
black spot.

Since EC Regulations in 2003, the product is no longer effective at
killing moss, nor will it be effective at preventing moss re-growth.



--
mailto : news {at} admac {dot} myzen {dot} co {dot} uk
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Old 17-01-2021, 06:15 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Posts: 2,151
Default Moss on Tarmac

On 17/01/2021 17:20, Chris Hogg wrote:
On Sun, 17 Jan 2021 16:54:07 +0000, alan_m
wrote:

On 17/01/2021 15:41, Chris Hogg wrote:
On Sun, 17 Jan 2021 14:38:15 +0000, Jeff Layman
wrote:

On 17/01/2021 12:46, The Natural Philosopher wrote:
On 17/01/2021 10:45, Jonathan Ward wrote:
On Saturday, January 16, 2021 at 4:18:40 PM UTC, Pwllgloyw wrote:
What is the best treatment to remove moss from a fairly old rough tarmac
surface please?

Ta
Armillotox

Jonathan

thats for fungus, not moss.

It's for neither. It lost its approval for use as a fungicide 17 years
ago! It can still be used as a disinfectant, and if it got spilt by
accident on some fungus or other...

In days of yore, wasn't armillatox the same as Jeyes fluid but just
under a different name for marketing purposes?


While some products have been re-formulated over the past decade or so
it may be that the manufactures are no longer able to claim their
product is for certain usages.

From the Jeyes Fluid FAQ or product description

Regrettably, as this product is now subject to Ministry regulations, we
are unable at present, to confirm recommendations other than those
printed on the latest can.

Since EC Regulations in 2003, the product is no longer effective at
sterilising soil.

Since EC Regulations in 2003, the product is no longer effective as a
winter wash.

Since EC Regulations in 2003, the product is no longer effective against
black spot.

Since EC Regulations in 2003, the product is no longer effective at
killing moss, nor will it be effective at preventing moss re-growth.


Well, I did say in days of yore, by which I meant in the later decades
of the last century. I think that in the past it contained tar
distillates (phenols and cresols) that were deemed to be carcinogenic,
which since 2003 have been removed and the whole thing re-formulated,
a bit like creosote. It was those tar distillates that made it
effective!


I think that it's similar to many things these days - just a dilute
detergent. In other words, no longer effective at almost anything! Other
than cleaning, of course. :-)

--

Jeff


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Old 17-01-2021, 11:18 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Posts: 35
Default Moss on Tarmac

In message , Jeff Layman
writes
On 17/01/2021 17:20, Chris Hogg wrote:
On Sun, 17 Jan 2021 16:54:07 +0000, alan_m
wrote:

On 17/01/2021 15:41, Chris Hogg wrote:
On Sun, 17 Jan 2021 14:38:15 +0000, Jeff Layman
wrote:

On 17/01/2021 12:46, The Natural Philosopher wrote:
On 17/01/2021 10:45, Jonathan Ward wrote:
On Saturday, January 16, 2021 at 4:18:40 PM UTC, Pwllgloyw wrote:
What is the best treatment to remove moss from a fairly old
rough tarmac
surface please?

Ta
Armillotox

Jonathan

thats for fungus, not moss.

It's for neither. It lost its approval for use as a fungicide 17 years
ago! It can still be used as a disinfectant, and if it got spilt by
accident on some fungus or other...

In days of yore, wasn't armillatox the same as Jeyes fluid but just
under a different name for marketing purposes?


While some products have been re-formulated over the past decade or so
it may be that the manufactures are no longer able to claim their
product is for certain usages.

From the Jeyes Fluid FAQ or product description

Regrettably, as this product is now subject to Ministry regulations, we
are unable at present, to confirm recommendations other than those
printed on the latest can.

Since EC Regulations in 2003, the product is no longer effective at
sterilising soil.

Since EC Regulations in 2003, the product is no longer effective as a
winter wash.

Since EC Regulations in 2003, the product is no longer effective against
black spot.

Since EC Regulations in 2003, the product is no longer effective at
killing moss, nor will it be effective at preventing moss re-growth.

Well, I did say in days of yore, by which I meant in the later
decades
of the last century. I think that in the past it contained tar
distillates (phenols and cresols) that were deemed to be carcinogenic,
which since 2003 have been removed and the whole thing re-formulated,
a bit like creosote. It was those tar distillates that made it
effective!


I think that it's similar to many things these days - just a dilute
detergent. In other words, no longer effective at almost anything!
Other than cleaning, of course. :-)

Use it as a perfume - and dab a little behind your ears?
--
Ian
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Old 18-01-2021, 07:03 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Posts: 155
Default Moss on Tarmac

On 17/01/2021 14:38, Jeff Layman wrote:
On 17/01/2021 12:46, The Natural Philosopher wrote:
On 17/01/2021 10:45, Jonathan Ward wrote:
On Saturday, January 16, 2021 at 4:18:40 PM UTC, Pwllgloyw wrote:
What is the best treatment to remove moss from a fairly old rough
tarmac
surface please?

Ta
Armillotox

Jonathan

thats for fungus, not moss.


It's for neither. It lost its approval for use as a fungicide 17 years
ago! It can still be used as a disinfectant, and if it got spilt by
accident on some fungus or other...

"Armillatox cannot be claimed as a Honey Fungus treatment but because it
is exactly the same formulation as it was in the days when it was called
a Honey Fungus treatment (in fact, Armillatox was invented for this
purposes - hence the name) that as a side effect of using the chemical
as a soap based garden cleaner, Honey Fungus can be treated."

https://www.landscapejuice.com/2008/...ing-honey.html


--
"The great thing about Glasgow is that if there's a nuclear attack it'll
look exactly the same afterwards."

Billy Connolly
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Old 18-01-2021, 09:59 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Posts: 2,151
Default Moss on Tarmac

On 18/01/2021 07:03, The Natural Philosopher wrote:
On 17/01/2021 14:38, Jeff Layman wrote:
On 17/01/2021 12:46, The Natural Philosopher wrote:
On 17/01/2021 10:45, Jonathan Ward wrote:
On Saturday, January 16, 2021 at 4:18:40 PM UTC, Pwllgloyw wrote:
What is the best treatment to remove moss from a fairly old rough
tarmac
surface please?

Ta
Armillotox

Jonathan

thats for fungus, not moss.


It's for neither. It lost its approval for use as a fungicide 17 years
ago! It can still be used as a disinfectant, and if it got spilt by
accident on some fungus or other...

"Armillatox cannot be claimed as a Honey Fungus treatment but because it
is exactly the same formulation as it was in the days when it was called
a Honey Fungus treatment (in fact, Armillatox was invented for this
purposes - hence the name) that as a side effect of using the chemical
as a soap based garden cleaner, Honey Fungus can be treated."

https://www.landscapejuice.com/2008/...ing-honey.html


Well, if you must quote a 13-years-old article, good luck finding a
container of Armillatox which actually contains the active ingredients
in it from 5 years before that article! In fact, the MSDS from the time
of its ban is he
http://www.sherriffamenity.com/UserAssets/MSDS/Armillatox%20MSDS.pdf

Have a look at
http://btckstorage.blob.core.windows.net/site11108/Fungicides-for-home-gardeners-March-2016.pdf,
Category 4 - Tar acids and oils. It states:
Active Ingredient Proprietary Name
Tar acids and oils Armillatox Soap Based Outdoor Cleaner*
* this product will be discontinued this year and an alternative
Armillatox Cleaner product will become available.

Whether or not it was reformulated, and, if so, with what, I haven't
been able to find out. This would suggest it's "made from naturally
occurring ingredients and is completely bio-degradable"
http://www.gablesgardens.co.uk/detail/1913-LT0071D/.

It would be interesting to look at any currently-available Armillatox
(if you can find any!) and browse the label to see what's in it.

--

Jeff
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Old 18-01-2021, 11:37 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Posts: 3
Default Moss on Tarmac

On Sunday, January 17, 2021 at 2:38:17 PM UTC, Jeff Layman wrote:
On 17/01/2021 12:46, The Natural Philosopher wrote:
On 17/01/2021 10:45, Jonathan Ward wrote:
On Saturday, January 16, 2021 at 4:18:40 PM UTC, Pwllgloyw wrote:
What is the best treatment to remove moss from a fairly old rough tarmac
surface please?

Ta
Armillotox

Jonathan

thats for fungus, not moss.

It's for neither. It lost its approval for use as a fungicide 17 years
ago! It can still be used as a disinfectant, and if it got spilt by
accident on some fungus or other...

--

Jeff

My ten year old bottle works on moss but suspect the formulation has changed since then.

Jonathan
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Old 18-01-2021, 01:18 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Posts: 155
Default Moss on Tarmac

On 18/01/2021 09:59, Jeff Layman wrote:
On 18/01/2021 07:03, The Natural Philosopher wrote:
On 17/01/2021 14:38, Jeff Layman wrote:
On 17/01/2021 12:46, The Natural Philosopher wrote:
On 17/01/2021 10:45, Jonathan Ward wrote:
On Saturday, January 16, 2021 at 4:18:40 PM UTC, Pwllgloyw wrote:
What is the best treatment to remove moss from a fairly old rough
tarmac
surface please?

Ta
Armillotox

Jonathan

thats for fungus, not moss.

It's for neither. It lost its approval for use as a fungicide 17 years
ago! It can still be used as a disinfectant, and if it got spilt by
accident on some fungus or other...

"Armillatox cannot be claimed as a Honey Fungus treatment but because it
is exactly the same formulation as it was in the days when it was called
a Honey Fungus treatment (in fact, Armillatox was invented for this
purposes - hence the name) that as a side effect of using the chemical
as a soap based garden cleaner, Honey Fungus can be treated."

https://www.landscapejuice.com/2008/...ing-honey.html


Well, if you must quote a 13-years-old article, good luck finding a
container of Armillatox which actually contains the active ingredients
in it from 5 years before that article! In fact, the MSDS from the time
of its ban is he
http://www.sherriffamenity.com/UserAssets/MSDS/Armillatox%20MSDS.pdf

Have a look at
http://btckstorage.blob.core.windows.net/site11108/Fungicides-for-home-gardeners-March-2016.pdf,
Category 4 - Tar acids and oils. It states:
Active Ingredient******* Proprietary Name
Tar acids and oils******* Armillatox Soap Based Outdoor Cleaner*
* this product will be discontinued this year and an alternative
Armillatox Cleaner product will become available.

Whether or not it was reformulated, and, if so, with what, I haven't
been able to find out. This would suggest it's "made from naturally
occurring ingredients and is completely bio-degradable"
http://www.gablesgardens.co.uk/detail/1913-LT0071D/.

It would be interesting to look at any currently-available Armillatox
(if you can find any!) and browse the* label to see what's in it.


it was *designed* for honey fungus. Hence the name.


--
Future generations will wonder in bemused amazement that the early
twenty-first century’s developed world went into hysterical panic over a
globally average temperature increase of a few tenths of a degree, and,
on the basis of gross exaggerations of highly uncertain computer
projections combined into implausible chains of inference, proceeded to
contemplate a rollback of the industrial age.

Richard Lindzen


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