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Old 17-04-2021, 07:11 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Wild Rasberries

I am wanting to have som semi-wild crops around the perimiter of a
little orchard. It's just for home use. Somewhere in the recess of my
brain I have an idea that you can propagate wild rasberries by cutting
them from where you find them and sticking them in the ground elsewhere?
or do you need to take the roots as well?

Tim w
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Old 17-04-2021, 08:21 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Wild Rasberries

On 17/04/2021 18:11, TimW wrote:
I am wanting to have som semi-wild crops around the perimiter of a
little orchard. It's just for home use. Somewhere in the recess of my
brain I have an idea that you can propagate wild rasberries by cutting
them from where you find them and sticking them in the ground elsewhere?
or do you need to take the roots as well?

Tim w

Normally you grab the suckers and separate them and they go just fine.
Consider also tayberries and 'large' blackberry cultivars.
All are just 'a wipe with a hedgetrimmer in autumn' and then they come
back the next year.



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There’s a mighty big difference between good, sound reasons and reasons
that sound good.

Burton Hillis (William Vaughn, American columnist)
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Old 17-04-2021, 11:25 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Wild Rasberries

On 2021-04-17, TimW wrote:
I am wanting to have som semi-wild crops around the perimiter of a
little orchard. It's just for home use. Somewhere in the recess of my
brain I have an idea that you can propagate wild rasberries by cutting
them from where you find them and sticking them in the ground elsewhere?
or do you need to take the roots as well?


I've never succeeded from cuttings. They propogate naturally by root
runners, and of course seed :-)

Most modern varieties are not brilliant taste wise. Whereas some wild
ones have an amazing taste. So if you find a really good wild raspberry,
you need a stem with root.

However you really should get the landowner's permission before digging
up and of their wild plants ;-)



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Old 20-04-2021, 11:07 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Wild Rasberries

On 17/04/2021 19:21, The Natural Philosopher wrote:
All are just 'a wipe with a hedgetrimmer in autumn' and then they come
back the next year.


Cultivated raspberries come in "summer" (floricane) and "autumn"
(primocane) varieties. I don't know off hand what the situation is in
the ancestral wild raspberry, but as some of the plants found in the
wild are escapes from cultivation there's be a definite chance of
acquiring a floricane form. Cutting those back in the autumn doesn't work.

(I've found that if you don't cut back primocane raspberries you get a
smaller crop in summer as well as the main autumn crop. My usual
practice is to cut out the dead growth about now, when you can see where
the new growth is.)

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Old 20-04-2021, 06:04 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Wild Rasberries

On 2021-04-20, Stewart Robert Hinsley wrote:
On 17/04/2021 19:21, The Natural Philosopher wrote:
All are just 'a wipe with a hedgetrimmer in autumn' and then they come
back the next year.


Cultivated raspberries come in "summer" (floricane) and "autumn"
(primocane) varieties. I don't know off hand what the situation is in
the ancestral wild raspberry,


I believe, the European wild raspberry is floricane. I have so far not
come across found "wild" autumn (primocane) raspberries - though garden
escapes should be around.

but as some of the plants found in the
wild are escapes from cultivation there's be a definite chance of
acquiring a floricane form. Cutting those back in the autumn doesn't work.


The usual advice for raspberry pruning, is to cut back the cane after it
has fruited. This works for summer or autumn fruiting types.

(I've found that if you don't cut back primocane raspberries you get a
smaller crop in summer as well as the main autumn crop. My usual
practice is to cut out the dead growth about now, when you can see where
the new growth is.)


Like you I also leave a few autumn fruiting canes (the ones that were
"late" and only fruited right at the top of the cane), to fruit in early
summer. I find that they are often a week or so early than the earliest
summer raspberries.


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