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Old 30-04-2021, 04:48 PM posted to uk.d-i-y,uk.rec.gardening
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Default Thinking abut a cordless hedgetrimmer

On 30/04/2021 14:15, Tim+ wrote:
If you’re feeling flush Stihl do cordless tools that can be used a socking
great battery backpack. This would make the tool lighter and possibly less
tiring to use but you’d have to factor in the 5.5kg battery on your back.


I've used the brushcutter with the backpack battery and hardly noticed
the battery weight, the tool is then remarkably light so on footpath
maintenance I trim the path and sides with a 4 edge blade in it. It has
nowhere near as much power as a petrol strimmer but much lighter to use.
When volunteering we are only allowed 60 minutes trigger time and the
battery lasted two of us.

Many professionals are using cordless pole pruners and long reach hedge
cutters now. Similarly many climbers now use the small Stihl 160 and
carry up to 5 batteries to last the day. In overall performance this is
less faff then putting petrol in the saw, though of course you have to
top up with chain oil.

As with other tradesmen if the client has mains electric available
batteries are kept on charge during the day and I have yet to hear of
anyone being charged for the electricity.

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Old 30-04-2021, 05:03 PM posted to uk.d-i-y,uk.rec.gardening
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Default Thinking abut a cordless hedgetrimmer

On 30/04/2021 15:52, Tim Streater wrote:
On 30 Apr 2021 at 13:41:23 BST, Andy Burns wrote:

Tim Streater wrote:

It's not pumping out 600W, that's how it's lighter.


My 36V brushcutter/strimmer puts out 1kW, but that is a 36V tool.


So it draws 28 amps? Must get toasty.


The batteries do get noticeably hot. Too hot for me to touch.
That is also true for a Dyson vacuum cleaner in continuous heavy use.

An AA cell can source over 10A into a dead short.
A D cell can probably manage nearer 100A. It will get hot!

It is probably one reason why their batteries don't last...

--
Regards,
Martin Brown
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Old 30-04-2021, 09:34 PM posted to uk.d-i-y,uk.rec.gardening
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Default Thinking abut a cordless hedgetrimmer

Tim Streater wrote:

Andy Burns wrote:

My 36V brushcutter/strimmer puts out 1kW


So it draws 28 amps? Must get toasty.


I think the 18650's are rated for 20A continuous, 30A peak, and I
suspect it'll take most at the point of stalling.

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Old 01-05-2021, 02:35 PM posted to uk.d-i-y,uk.rec.gardening
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Default Thinking abut a cordless hedgetrimmer

OP here.

Thanks for a very useful discussion. I conclude that - horses for
courses - a cordless isn't the horse for my course [yet].

I do have a small (40cm) B&D cordless which is now about 5 years old.
With the enormous strides in battery and other electronic technologies,
I wondered if they now make a cordless which combines great power with
lighter weight. It seems that they don't.

Thanks a lot for all the opinions!

John


Postscript of dubious value:

My particular "course", as I said in the post, is that I do *a lot* of
hedges: I cut the hedges in three gardens (mine and two others); the
total length must be about 200 yards, counting two sides in a few cases;
the average height overall is over 6 feet. The hedges are [thinks]
cotoneaster, beech, hazel, [ivy], hawthorn, blackthorn, and the damned
holly (which must make up half the total: what a ******* that is to
trim, especially when you're half-way up a ladder).

Going up (and down) the ladder, is the worst thing, these days: joints
and legs.

All these hedges are very mature, and therefore have thicker branches to
cut at intervals, in different places. Hence, I chose a cutter which
has a wide tooth spacing - 26mm in this case. Even when the branch is
somewhat thicker (within reason), sawing at it with this trimmer will
deal with it.

As I said, it's a Bosch 55-26 - 55cm blade, 26mm tooth spacing. Also as
I said, it "blazes" through all this hedging. I only cut most of the
stuff once a year, but in my own garden I do some every growing month,
the rest just twice a year. (And always outside the nesting season of
course.)

From the discussion, my gut feeling was right: nothing compares to mains
power [coming into a powerful cutter].

Of course a 4-stroke petrol would be more powerful (and free of those
reels of cable), but my work nowhere near justifies that kind of cost.
Furthermo even a 4-stroke is noisy, but a 2-stroke is absolute hell -
for the user, and for the neighbours. I have never considered using a
petrol cutter.
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Old 01-05-2021, 05:54 PM posted to uk.d-i-y,uk.rec.gardening
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Default Thinking abut a cordless hedgetrimmer

On 30/04/2021 14:54, newshound wrote:
Have you actually tried a modern battery chainsaw, then?


Yes. A bag of shite when you're used to a good quality petrol machine.

Bill


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Old 01-05-2021, 05:57 PM posted to uk.d-i-y,uk.rec.gardening
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Default Thinking abut a cordless hedgetrimmer

On 01/05/2021 14:35, Another John wrote:
With the enormous strides in battery and other electronic technologies,


What enormous strides? The energy/weight figure for battery is still
light years behind petrol.

Bill
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Old 01-05-2021, 06:57 PM posted to uk.d-i-y,uk.rec.gardening
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Default Thinking abut a cordless hedgetrimmer

On 01/05/2021 17:54, williamwright wrote:
On 30/04/2021 14:54, newshound wrote:
Have you actually tried a modern battery chainsaw, then?


Yes. A bag of shite when you're used to a good quality petrol machine.

Bill

well yes.
My shoulders are aching from this afternoons efforts to chop up a 10
metre tall tree that fell over last year.
The thickest part of the trunk - that I have yet to tackle - is about 2'
diameter.

My little chainsaw - petrol - is having trouble with the 8" diameter
sections. I guess its around 1500W equivalent.

I was on for about a continuous hour today 1.5kwh.

The equivalent battery model is twice the price and has little more than
half an hour in the battery

and weighs only a little less.

--
It’s easier to fool people than to convince them that they have been fooled.
Mark Twain


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Old 01-05-2021, 07:00 PM posted to uk.d-i-y,uk.rec.gardening
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Default Thinking abut a cordless hedgetrimmer

On 01/05/2021 17:57, williamwright wrote:
On 01/05/2021 14:35, Another John wrote:
With the enormous strides in battery and other electronic technologies,


What enormous strides? The energy/weight figure for battery is still
light years behind petrol.

Bill

No, not light years, about 50%, For the whole package. A neodymium based
brushless motor is a lot lighter than an equivalent 2 stroke. But the
final weight is really all about battery capacity. That means a cordless
is a winner for occasional consumer use, but is ****ing pointless if you
need to run the thing all day on a major bit of tree surgery


--
Truth welcomes investigation because truth knows investigation will lead
to converts. It is deception that uses all the other techniques.
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Old 01-05-2021, 07:04 PM posted to uk.d-i-y,uk.rec.gardening
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Default Thinking abut a cordless hedgetrimmer

On 01/05/2021 14:35, Another John wrote:
I wondered if they now make a cordless which combines great power with
lighter weight. It seems that they don't.

They do, but the price you pay is very short charge life. and its not a
lot lighter.



--
The biggest threat to humanity comes from socialism, which has utterly
diverted our attention away from what really matters to our existential
survival, to indulging in navel gazing and faux moral investigations
into what the world ought to be, whilst we fail utterly to deal with
what it actually is.

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Old 01-05-2021, 07:04 PM posted to uk.d-i-y,uk.rec.gardening
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Default Thinking abut a cordless hedgetrimmer

In article ,
The Natural Philosopher wrote:

My little chainsaw - petrol - is having trouble with the 8" diameter
sections. I guess its around 1500W equivalent.


A decent bowsaw would have no trouble at all with such diameters,
unless the wood is yew or hawthorn, when anything would. Yes, it
would take some time and effort.


Regards,
Nick Maclaren.


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Old 01-05-2021, 07:05 PM posted to uk.d-i-y,uk.rec.gardening
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Default Thinking abut a cordless hedgetrimmer

On 01/05/2021 14:35, Another John wrote:
I have never considered using a
petrol cutter.

given something like a total of 500 meters of hedge I never considered
using anything else....:-)

--
The biggest threat to humanity comes from socialism, which has utterly
diverted our attention away from what really matters to our existential
survival, to indulging in navel gazing and faux moral investigations
into what the world ought to be, whilst we fail utterly to deal with
what it actually is.

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Old 01-05-2021, 07:23 PM posted to uk.d-i-y,uk.rec.gardening
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Default Thinking abut a cordless hedgetrimmer

On 01/05/2021 19:04, Nick Maclaren wrote:
In article ,
The Natural Philosopher wrote:

My little chainsaw - petrol - is having trouble with the 8" diameter
sections. I guess its around 1500W equivalent.


A decent bowsaw would have no trouble at all with such diameters,
unless the wood is yew or hawthorn, when anything would. Yes, it
would take some time and effort.

Oh sure. When the last chainsaw died I used the bowsaw on similar, this
is 5-10 times faster. And I am getting too old

Nothing specially tough about hawthorn, This is field maple. Tougher
than hawthorn IME. Last hawthorn I cut up the small Stihl waltzed through.

maple similar to oak and yew but cant find specs for hawthorn on line...
oh..they reckon 2x hard - well I didnt find it so


What I meant was that its taking a long time to cut the tree. Its purely
a function of power, but then a more powerful saw would weigh even more.

I can probably do about 100W bow sawing. Chainsaw does 1500W.



Regards,
Nick Maclaren.



--
There is nothing a fleet of dispatchable nuclear power plants cannot do
that cannot be done worse and more expensively and with higher carbon
emissions and more adverse environmental impact by adding intermittent
renewable energy.
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Old 01-05-2021, 07:29 PM posted to uk.d-i-y,uk.rec.gardening
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Default Thinking abut a cordless hedgetrimmer

On 01/05/2021 19:04, Nick Maclaren wrote:
In article ,
The Natural Philosopher wrote:

My little chainsaw - petrol - is having trouble with the 8" diameter
sections. I guess its around 1500W equivalent.


A decent bowsaw would have no trouble at all with such diameters,
unless the wood is yew or hawthorn, when anything would. Yes, it
would take some time and effort.


Good grief! Not on your Nelly! If I want exercise I'll walk to the
fridge for another beer.

Bill
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Old 01-05-2021, 07:32 PM posted to uk.d-i-y,uk.rec.gardening
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Default Thinking abut a cordless hedgetrimmer

On 01/05/2021 19:00, The Natural Philosopher wrote:

What enormous strides? The energy/weight figure for battery is still
light years behind petrol.

Bill

No, not light years, about 50%,


That doesn't equate with a vehicle's range with a tankful of petrol
compared to a battery full of leccy. And the battery weighs a lot more
than the petrol.

Bill
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Old 01-05-2021, 07:52 PM posted to uk.d-i-y,uk.rec.gardening
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Default Thinking abut a cordless hedgetrimmer

The Natural Philosopher wrote:

My little chainsaw - petrol - is having trouble with the 8" diameter
sections. I guess its around 1500W equivalent.


My 36V chainsaw (with a nice new blade) happily slices 14" willow
trunks, it says it's 1100W max.



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