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Old 30-06-2003, 02:22 PM
Alan
 
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Default Black Spot and Sodium Bicarbonate ???

I've heard of people spraying baking soda / sodium bicarbonate to control
black spot on their roses. Has anyone here had any success with this. I did
a search of this group on google and found references to powdery midew but
not to blck spot so sorry if the question has been asked recently.

Alan



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Old 30-06-2003, 04:58 PM
Jim W
 
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Default Black Spot and Sodium Bicarbonate ???

Alan wrote:

I've heard of people spraying baking soda / sodium bicarbonate to control
black spot on their roses. Has anyone here had any success with this. I did
a search of this group on google and found references to powdery midew but
not to blck spot so sorry if the question has been asked recently.

Alan



Did you use latin names and try google for the web. I'll make sure this
one goes in the archive;-)

Only a search for DIPLOCARPON ROSAE Sodium Bicorbonate on the web
brought up plenty for me.. Although some were *also* refs to the powdery
mildew.

The other thing to do is to use the Chemical symbol formula so you'd
search for:
DIPLOCARPON ROSAE NaHCO3

Although in this case google found that too specific (only 4 hits!)

The trick with blackspot seems to be addition of an oil and or potassium
bicarbonate. Neem oil is also mentioned.

The basis of most of these bicarbonate controls is that they upset the
pH balance enough to prevent the pest functioning.

Incidentally the mildew experiment is one I repeated at University.. My
results were inconclusive!-))

I found this site:
http://www.herts.ac.uk/natsci/Env/Fu...spot/home.html
Most interesting although out of date (2 years).. It only compounds my
feelings as an organic supporter NEVER to purchase cut flowers again!-)

Useful stuff sodium bicarb.. Its also used extensively by kidney
patients-)

//
Jim
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Old 30-06-2003, 08:08 PM
Rod
 
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Default Black Spot and Sodium Bicarbonate ???


"Jim W" wrote in message
Only a search for DIPLOCARPON ROSAE Sodium Bicorbonate on the web brought up plenty for me.. Although some were

*also* refs to the powdery
mildew. The other thing to do is to use the Chemical symbol formula so you'd search for:
DIPLOCARPON ROSAE NaHCO3
Although in this case google found that too specific (only 4 hits!)

The trick with blackspot seems to be addition of an oil and or potassium bicarbonate. Neem oil is also mentioned.
The basis of most of these bicarbonate controls is that they upset the pH balance enough to prevent the pest

functioning.
Incidentally the mildew experiment is one I repeated at University.. My results were inconclusive!-))

http://www.herts.ac.uk/natsci/Env/Fu...spot/home.html
Most interesting although out of date (2 years).. It only compounds my feelings as an organic supporter NEVER to
purchase cut flowers again!-)

Useful stuff sodium bicarb


Hmm.............looks like something individuals could usefully pursue without research funding - just so long as you
don't tell anybody you're using Bicarb for an off label purpose ;~))
It's difficult to imagine getting worse control than is currently available with the current domestic fungicides.

Rod.





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Old 30-06-2003, 11:20 PM
Jim W
 
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Default Black Spot and Sodium Bicarbonate ???

Rod wrote:


"Jim W" wrote in message Only a
search for DIPLOCARPON ROSAE Sodium Bicorbonate on the web brought up
plenty for me.. Although some were *also* refs to the powdery mildew.
The other thing to do is to use the Chemical symbol formula so you'd
search for: DIPLOCARPON ROSAE NaHCO3 Although in this case google
found that too specific (only 4 hits!) The trick with blackspot seems
to be addition of an oil and or potassium bicarbonate. Neem oil is also
mentioned. The basis of most of these bicarbonate controls is that they
upset the pH balance enough to prevent the pest functioning.

Incidentally the mildew experiment is one I repeated at University.. My
results were inconclusive!-))
http://www.herts.ac.uk/natsci/Env/Fu...spot/home.html Most
interesting although out of date (2 years).. It only compounds my
feelings as an organic supporter NEVER to purchase cut flowers again!-)
Useful stuff sodium bicarb


Hmm.............looks like something individuals could usefully pursue
without research funding - just so long as you don't tell anybody you're
using Bicarb for an off label purpose ;~)) It's difficult to imagine
getting worse control than is currently available with the current
domestic fungicides.


You're right but I think you'll find that the agropharm industries have
already done much research.
//
J
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Old 30-06-2003, 11:20 PM
Jim W
 
Posts: n/a
Default Black Spot and Sodium Bicarbonate ???

Rod wrote:


"Jim W" wrote in message Only a
search for DIPLOCARPON ROSAE Sodium Bicorbonate on the web brought up
plenty for me.. Although some were *also* refs to the powdery mildew.
The other thing to do is to use the Chemical symbol formula so you'd
search for: DIPLOCARPON ROSAE NaHCO3 Although in this case google
found that too specific (only 4 hits!) The trick with blackspot seems
to be addition of an oil and or potassium bicarbonate. Neem oil is also
mentioned. The basis of most of these bicarbonate controls is that they
upset the pH balance enough to prevent the pest functioning.

Incidentally the mildew experiment is one I repeated at University.. My
results were inconclusive!-))
http://www.herts.ac.uk/natsci/Env/Fu...spot/home.html Most
interesting although out of date (2 years).. It only compounds my
feelings as an organic supporter NEVER to purchase cut flowers again!-)
Useful stuff sodium bicarb


Hmm.............looks like something individuals could usefully pursue
without research funding - just so long as you don't tell anybody you're
using Bicarb for an off label purpose ;~)) It's difficult to imagine
getting worse control than is currently available with the current
domestic fungicides.


You're right but I think you'll find that the agropharm industries have
already done much research.
//
J


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Old 01-07-2003, 06:28 PM
Rod
 
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Default Black Spot and Sodium Bicarbonate ???


"Jim W" wrote You're right but I think you'll find that the agropharm
industries have already done much research.


They can't patent it so presumably any positive results wouldn't be very interesting to them - certainly not
sufficiently interesting to tell the public about.

Rod


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Old 02-07-2003, 04:32 PM
Jim W
 
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Default Black Spot and Sodium Bicarbonate ???

Rod wrote:

"Jim W" wrote You're right but I
think you'll find that the agropharm industries have already done much
research.

They can't patent it so presumably any positive results wouldn't be very
interesting to them - certainly not sufficiently interesting to tell the
public about.

Rod


No but they could patent a domestic product made of say Sodium Bicarb
and an adjuvant etc;-) They're as cunning as a cunning weasel with a
certificate of cunningness from the university of cunning;-)
//
Jim


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