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Old 28-07-2003, 11:02 AM
Andy Sanson
 
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Default Bindweed and nettles

Any hypnotists out there who would like to persuade the population of the UK
that bindweed and nettles are the basic ingredients of the elixir of life so
that together, with your skills and my garden, we can make a fortune?



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Old 28-07-2003, 03:08 PM
Dave Henson
 
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Default Bindweed and nettles

"Andy Sanson" wrote in message
...
Any hypnotists out there who would like to persuade the population of the

UK
that bindweed and nettles are the basic ingredients of the elixir of life

so
that together, with your skills and my garden, we can make a fortune?


Great idea! I could make a fortune too. Can we include ground elder in the
brew?

Dave.


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Old 28-07-2003, 05:32 PM
Derek Turner
 
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Default Bindweed and nettles

On Mon, 28 Jul 2003 14:50:05 +0100, "Dave Henson"
wrote:

Great idea! I could make a fortune too. Can we include ground elder in the
brew?


Ground elder _does_ have medicinal properties (I forget what they are)
which is one reason that there is so much of it about: it was
deliberately planted in physic gardens.
--
Derek Turner

Outlook Express is worth precisely what you paid for it.
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Old 28-07-2003, 06:03 PM
Dave Henson
 
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Default Bindweed and nettles

"Derek Turner" wrote in message
...
On Mon, 28 Jul 2003 14:50:05 +0100, "Dave Henson"
wrote:

Great idea! I could make a fortune too. Can we include ground elder in

the
brew?


Ground elder _does_ have medicinal properties (I forget what they are)
which is one reason that there is so much of it about: it was
deliberately planted in physic gardens.
--
Derek Turner


Great - so I don't even have to share my profits with the hypnotist.


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Old 29-07-2003, 12:17 AM
Janet Baraclough
 
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Default Bindweed and nettles

The message
from "Andy Sanson" contains these words:

Any hypnotists out there who would like to persuade the population of the UK
that bindweed and nettles are the basic ingredients of the elixir of life so
that together, with your skills and my garden, we can make a fortune?


Nettles already are an elixir of life, not least to caterpillars,
which miraculously turn into butterflies. They also make wonderful
fertiliser for your garden, compost activator, treatment for rheumatism;
plus you can eat them (vitamin and iron rich), and weave a very fine
cloth from their fibre.

Bindweed is probably equally useful, we just haven't recognised its
potential yet.

Janet.



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Old 30-07-2003, 07:02 AM
Andy Sanson
 
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Default Bindweed and nettles

Nettles also make excellent wine if you just use the tips and young bits. I
haven't tried bindweed wine. You can probably make jams and jellies from
nettles too but none of this alters the fact that the little ******s sting.
Has anyone else noticed that however careful you are about pulling them up,
the stingy bits always chase after you and ambush you from unexpected
directions?

"Janet Baraclough" wrote in message
...
The message
from "Andy Sanson" contains these words:

Any hypnotists out there who would like to persuade the population of

the UK
that bindweed and nettles are the basic ingredients of the elixir of

life so
that together, with your skills and my garden, we can make a fortune?


Nettles already are an elixir of life, not least to caterpillars,
which miraculously turn into butterflies. They also make wonderful
fertiliser for your garden, compost activator, treatment for rheumatism;
plus you can eat them (vitamin and iron rich), and weave a very fine
cloth from their fibre.

Bindweed is probably equally useful, we just haven't recognised its
potential yet.

Janet.



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Old 30-07-2003, 07:02 AM
Andy Sanson
 
Posts: n/a
Default Bindweed and nettles

Nettles also make excellent wine if you just use the tips and young bits. I
haven't tried bindweed wine. You can probably make jams and jellies from
nettles too but none of this alters the fact that the little ******s sting.
Has anyone else noticed that however careful you are about pulling them up,
the stingy bits always chase after you and ambush you from unexpected
directions?

"Janet Baraclough" wrote in message
...
The message
from "Andy Sanson" contains these words:

Any hypnotists out there who would like to persuade the population of

the UK
that bindweed and nettles are the basic ingredients of the elixir of

life so
that together, with your skills and my garden, we can make a fortune?


Nettles already are an elixir of life, not least to caterpillars,
which miraculously turn into butterflies. They also make wonderful
fertiliser for your garden, compost activator, treatment for rheumatism;
plus you can eat them (vitamin and iron rich), and weave a very fine
cloth from their fibre.

Bindweed is probably equally useful, we just haven't recognised its
potential yet.

Janet.



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Old 30-07-2003, 07:12 AM
Andy Sanson
 
Posts: n/a
Default Bindweed and nettles

Nettles also make excellent wine if you just use the tips and young bits. I
haven't tried bindweed wine. You can probably make jams and jellies from
nettles too but none of this alters the fact that the little ******s sting.
Has anyone else noticed that however careful you are about pulling them up,
the stingy bits always chase after you and ambush you from unexpected
directions?

"Janet Baraclough" wrote in message
...
The message
from "Andy Sanson" contains these words:

Any hypnotists out there who would like to persuade the population of

the UK
that bindweed and nettles are the basic ingredients of the elixir of

life so
that together, with your skills and my garden, we can make a fortune?


Nettles already are an elixir of life, not least to caterpillars,
which miraculously turn into butterflies. They also make wonderful
fertiliser for your garden, compost activator, treatment for rheumatism;
plus you can eat them (vitamin and iron rich), and weave a very fine
cloth from their fibre.

Bindweed is probably equally useful, we just haven't recognised its
potential yet.

Janet.




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Old 30-07-2003, 07:12 AM
Andy Sanson
 
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Default Bindweed and nettles

Sorry about multiple posting. Server playing games with me. Too early in the
morning. D'oh!

"Andy Sanson" wrote in message
...
Nettles also make excellent wine if you just use the tips and young bits.

I
haven't tried bindweed wine. You can probably make jams and jellies from
nettles too but none of this alters the fact that the little ******s

sting.
Has anyone else noticed that however careful you are about pulling them

up,
the stingy bits always chase after you and ambush you from unexpected
directions?

"Janet Baraclough" wrote in message
...
The message
from "Andy Sanson" contains these words:

Any hypnotists out there who would like to persuade the population of

the UK
that bindweed and nettles are the basic ingredients of the elixir of

life so
that together, with your skills and my garden, we can make a fortune?


Nettles already are an elixir of life, not least to caterpillars,
which miraculously turn into butterflies. They also make wonderful
fertiliser for your garden, compost activator, treatment for rheumatism;
plus you can eat them (vitamin and iron rich), and weave a very fine
cloth from their fibre.

Bindweed is probably equally useful, we just haven't recognised its
potential yet.

Janet.





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Old 30-07-2003, 10:12 AM
Derek Turner
 
Posts: n/a
Default Bindweed and nettles

On Mon, 28 Jul 2003 17:57:36 +0100, "Dave Henson"
wrote:

Ground elder _does_ have medicinal properties (I forget what they are)
which is one reason that there is so much of it about: it was
deliberately planted in physic gardens.
--
Derek Turner


Great - so I don't even have to share my profits with the hypnotist.


Found this on 'Goutweed' aka Ground Elder

quote
---Medicinal Action and Uses---Diuretic and sedative. Can be
successfully employed internally for aches in the joints, gouty and
sciatic pains, and externally as a fomentation for inflamed parts.

The roots and leaves boiled together, applied to the hip, and
occasionally renewed,have a wonderful effect in some cases of
sciatica.

Culpepper says:
'It is not to be supposed Goutwort hath its name for nothing, but upon
experiment to heal the gout and sciatica; as also joint-aches and
other cold griefs. The very bearing of it about one eases the pains of
the gout and defends him that bears it from the disease.'
Gerard tells us that:
'with his roots stamped and laid upon members that are troubled or
vexed with gout, swageth the paine, and taketh away the swelling and
inflammation thereof, which occasioned the Germans to give it the name
of Podagraria, because of his virtues in curing the gout.'
/quote

he

http://www.botanical.com/botanical/mgmh/g/goutwe32.html
--
Derek Turner

Outlook Express is worth precisely what you paid for it.


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Old 30-07-2003, 07:46 PM
John Rouse
 
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Default Bindweed and nettles

In article , Janet Baraclough
writes

Bindweed is probably equally useful, we just haven't recognised its
potential yet.


You call it Morning Glory and sell it in Garden Centres.

John
--
John Rouse
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Old 30-07-2003, 10:09 PM
Rodger Whitlock
 
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Default Bindweed and nettles

On Wed, 30 Jul 2003 06:40:15 +0100, Andy Sanson wrote:

I haven't tried bindweed wine.



And I'm going to suggest that you not even think about trying it.

There's an old-fashioned purgative "scammony" that is (unless my
memory is completely gone) made from the root of a
convolvulaceous plant. Its action is what they used to call
"drastic" -- to be plain, you shit yourself totally empty and
then some as the intestines secrete vast amounts of fluid. Used
to be used in cases of dropsy to get excess fluids out of the
body.

You might say that it produces effects rather like the rice grain
stools of cholera.

In addition, bindweed has a latex as sap, and I have an intuitive
idea that that's generally a sign "not to be consumed
internally". Think of the irritant latex of the greater
celandine, Chelidonium majus, and of all the euphorbias.


--
Rodger Whitlock
Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
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Old 30-07-2003, 10:26 PM
Rodger Whitlock
 
Posts: n/a
Default Bindweed and nettles

On Wed, 30 Jul 2003 06:40:15 +0100, Andy Sanson wrote:

I haven't tried bindweed wine.



And I'm going to suggest that you not even think about trying it.

There's an old-fashioned purgative "scammony" that is (unless my
memory is completely gone) made from the root of a
convolvulaceous plant. Its action is what they used to call
"drastic" -- to be plain, you shit yourself totally empty and
then some as the intestines secrete vast amounts of fluid. Used
to be used in cases of dropsy to get excess fluids out of the
body.

You might say that it produces effects rather like the rice grain
stools of cholera.

In addition, bindweed has a latex as sap, and I have an intuitive
idea that that's generally a sign "not to be consumed
internally". Think of the irritant latex of the greater
celandine, Chelidonium majus, and of all the euphorbias.


--
Rodger Whitlock
Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
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Old 30-07-2003, 10:49 PM
Franz Heymann
 
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Default Bindweed and nettles


"Rodger Whitlock" wrote in
message ...
On Wed, 30 Jul 2003 06:40:15 +0100, Andy Sanson wrote:

I haven't tried bindweed wine.



And I'm going to suggest that you not even think about trying it.

There's an old-fashioned purgative "scammony" that is (unless my
memory is completely gone) made from the root of a
convolvulaceous plant. Its action is what they used to call
"drastic" -- to be plain, you shit yourself totally empty and
then some as the intestines secrete vast amounts of fluid. Used
to be used in cases of dropsy to get excess fluids out of the
body.

You might say that it produces effects rather like the rice grain
stools of cholera.

In addition, bindweed has a latex as sap, and I have an intuitive
idea that that's generally a sign "not to be consumed
internally". Think of the irritant latex of the greater
celandine, Chelidonium majus, and of all the euphorbias.

I have a vague memory to the effect that dried bindweed leaves make a good
substitute for marijuana. I have no idea of how true or otherwise it might
be. [Franz Heymann]



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Old 30-07-2003, 11:32 PM
Janet Baraclough
 
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Default Bindweed and nettles

The message
from John Rouse contains these words:

In article , Janet Baraclough
writes


Bindweed is probably equally useful, we just haven't recognised its
potential yet.


You call it Morning Glory and sell it in Garden Centres.


:-). The very large-flowerd white one that grows in hedgerows, has
really beautiful flowers...we could market that as "climbing white lily;
wonderful in containers, trained up spiral stainless steel supports".

Urg's Meeja Lurkers are all scribbling it down in their notepads...

Janet.



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