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Old 16-09-2003, 05:13 PM
jo
 
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Default Passion Fruit - When to pick

I have a passion flower that has borne a huge number of fruit. Most of the
fruit are now orange in colour. I have left them on the plant as I thought
they went brown and crinkly with dry skins (as you buy them in the shops),
but some are starting to turn mouldy. Any tips?
Jo



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Old 16-09-2003, 05:13 PM
Nick Maclaren
 
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Default Passion Fruit - When to pick


In article , "jo" writes:
| I have a passion flower that has borne a huge number of fruit. Most of the
| fruit are now orange in colour. I have left them on the plant as I thought
| they went brown and crinkly with dry skins (as you buy them in the shops),
| but some are starting to turn mouldy. Any tips?

The ones you buy are P. edulis. P. caerulea are orange when ripe.


Regards,
Nick Maclaren.
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Old 16-09-2003, 05:23 PM
Pam Moore
 
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Default Passion Fruit - When to pick

On Tue, 16 Sep 2003 17:05:53 +0100, "jo"
wrote:

I have a passion flower that has borne a huge number of fruit. Most of the
fruit are now orange in colour. I have left them on the plant as I thought
they went brown and crinkly with dry skins (as you buy them in the shops),
but some are starting to turn mouldy. Any tips?


I've not grown them but I understand that the one with orange fruits
is not the same variety as you buy in the shops. Someone will have
better info, but I'm not sure if yours are worth eating.
I think the edible one is passiflora edulis and the "common or
garden" one is p. caerulea.

Pam in Bristol
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Old 16-09-2003, 06:32 PM
Drakanthus
 
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Default Passion Fruit - When to pick

I have a passion flower that has borne a huge number of fruit. Most of
the
fruit are now orange in colour. I have left them on the plant as I

thought
they went brown and crinkly with dry skins (as you buy them in the shops),
but some are starting to turn mouldy. Any tips?
Jo


Why not try one and see if it is ripe?
The ornamental passion flowers are really grown for their flowers rather
than their fruits, however I tried some of mine last year when they were
orange and enjoyed them. Nice with ice cream.

--
Drakanthus.


(Spam filter: Include the word VB anywhere in the subject line or emails
will never reach me.)


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Old 16-09-2003, 08:32 PM
Jaques d'Altrades
 
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Default Passion Fruit - When to pick

The message
from "Drakanthus" contains these words:
I have a passion flower that has borne a huge number of fruit. Most of

the
fruit are now orange in colour. I have left them on the plant as I

thought
they went brown and crinkly with dry skins (as you buy them in the shops),
but some are starting to turn mouldy. Any tips?
Jo


Why not try one and see if it is ripe?
The ornamental passion flowers are really grown for their flowers rather
than their fruits, however I tried some of mine last year when they were
orange and enjoyed them. Nice with ice cream.


I have some granadillo vines grown from seed. Closely related to
passionfruit - anyone know if they are hardy enough to grow outside?

--
Rusty Hinge
No m'lud, it wasn't a sneg. My joints creak.


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Old 16-09-2003, 09:22 PM
Nick Maclaren
 
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Default Passion Fruit - When to pick

In article ,
Jaques d'Altrades wrote:

I have some granadillo vines grown from seed. Closely related to
passionfruit - anyone know if they are hardy enough to grow outside?


That's easy - no. Outside the warmest parts of the UK, P. caerulea
is pretty well the only hardy one (and even then it tends to be
herbaceous). According the the books I have seen, none of the ones
grown for their fruit are likely to be hardy even in the warmest
parts of the UK. But a lot of the genus will do well in pots
outside in summer, if given some protection in winter - and that
doesn't necessarily mean more than being kept dryish and frost-free.

Which species is a granadillo?


Regards,
Nick Maclaren.
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Old 17-09-2003, 09:42 AM
Charlie Pridham
 
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Default Passion Fruit - When to pick


"Nick Maclaren" wrote in message
...
In article ,
Jaques d'Altrades wrote:


Which species is a granadillo?


Regards,
Nick Maclaren.


Its one of the passion flowers grown for fruit. (can't remember the species
but chilterns sell the seed)

--
Charlie, gardening in Cornwall.
http://www.roselandhouse.co.uk
Holders of National Plant Collection of Clematis viticella (cvs)



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Old 17-09-2003, 10:02 AM
Nick Maclaren
 
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Default Passion Fruit - When to pick


In article ,
"Charlie Pridham" writes:
|
| Which species is a granadillo?
|
| Its one of the passion flowers grown for fruit. (can't remember the species
| but chilterns sell the seed)

Yes, yes, I know that! But I also know that the word is a generic
one (not in the botanical sense) and is likely to refer to several
different species, depending on context.


Regards,
Nick Maclaren.
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Old 18-09-2003, 09:15 AM
Charlie Pridham
 
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Default Passion Fruit - When to pick


"Nick Maclaren" wrote in message
...

In article ,
"Charlie Pridham" writes:
|
| Which species is a granadillo?
|
| Its one of the passion flowers grown for fruit. (can't remember the

species
| but chilterns sell the seed)

Yes, yes, I know that! But I also know that the word is a generic
one (not in the botanical sense) and is likely to refer to several
different species, depending on context.


Regards,
Nick Maclaren.


I have heard it used most frequently with regard to the various named
fruiting cultivars of P. edulis which are often sold as "Purple Granadilla"
"Golden Granadilla" etc which I gather from the above you know already! :~)
In case the original poster is still following this. These "Granadilla"
types often require a cross polinator (a second unrelated plant, like
certain apples) to produce fruit crops, but are certainly a better bet
eating wise than the bland insipid P.caerulea fruits!
--
Charlie, gardening in Cornwall.
http://www.roselandhouse.co.uk
Holders of National Plant Collection of Clematis viticella (cvs)



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Old 18-09-2003, 09:29 AM
Charlie Pridham
 
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Default Passion Fruit - When to pick


"Nick Maclaren" wrote in message
...

In article ,
"Charlie Pridham" writes:
|
| Which species is a granadillo?
|
| Its one of the passion flowers grown for fruit. (can't remember the

species
| but chilterns sell the seed)

Yes, yes, I know that! But I also know that the word is a generic
one (not in the botanical sense) and is likely to refer to several
different species, depending on context.


Regards,
Nick Maclaren.


I have heard it used most frequently with regard to the various named
fruiting cultivars of P. edulis which are often sold as "Purple Granadilla"
"Golden Granadilla" etc which I gather from the above you know already! :~)
In case the original poster is still following this. These "Granadilla"
types often require a cross polinator (a second unrelated plant, like
certain apples) to produce fruit crops, but are certainly a better bet
eating wise than the bland insipid P.caerulea fruits!
--
Charlie, gardening in Cornwall.
http://www.roselandhouse.co.uk
Holders of National Plant Collection of Clematis viticella (cvs)





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Old 18-09-2003, 10:32 AM
Victoria Clare
 
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Default Passion Fruit - When to pick

"Charlie Pridham" wrote in
:

(talking about grenadillos)

In case the original poster is still following this.
These "Granadilla" types often require a cross polinator (a second
unrelated plant, like certain apples) to produce fruit crops, but are
certainly a better bet eating wise than the bland insipid P.caerulea
fruits!


I have a theory that P caerulea is a pretty variable plant. For example,
I've seen it described as having no scent, but both of mine have a gorgeous
scent which you can smell right across the patio, even if only a couple of
flowers are out. They are bog standard plants from a seed packet.

My guess is that the fruits may be similarly variable, as people seem to
report both nice and inedibly bland ones. Min haven't reached fruiting size
yet, though they flower well.

Victoria
--
gardening on a north-facing hill
in South-East Cornwall
--
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Old 18-09-2003, 12:05 PM
Jaques d'Altrades
 
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Default Passion Fruit - When to pick

The message . 10
from Victoria Clare contains these words:
"Charlie Pridham" wrote in
:


(talking about grenadillos)


In case the original poster is still following this.
These "Granadilla" types often require a cross polinator (a second
unrelated plant, like certain apples) to produce fruit crops, but are
certainly a better bet eating wise than the bland insipid P.caerulea
fruits!


I've posted three items to this thread - only the first has appeared in
my downloads. This could have something to do with one of the big German
servers going down.

The second was a detailed reply to Nick Maclaren's post, following his
within a very short time, and later, a followup to see if he'd seen it.
I've had a little firkle, and nothing from this group has fallen into my
spamtrap.
_||_
I'll have to grow another post. Down there \ /
\/
I have a theory that P caerulea is a pretty variable plant. For example,
I've seen it described as having no scent, but both of mine have a gorgeous
scent which you can smell right across the patio, even if only a couple of
flowers are out. They are bog standard plants from a seed packet.


Oh. Could you save me some of your seeds please?

My guess is that the fruits may be similarly variable, as people seem to
report both nice and inedibly bland ones. Min haven't reached fruiting size
yet, though they flower well.


The 'granadilla' I have growing (in spades) has glossy leaves about the
size of a hand, (a bit like black bryony,) but heart-shaped with a
cuspidate point.

The seeds are shaped rather like shelled sunflower seeds, but black and
with a wartyness which is rather toadlike.

The fruit (from a supermarket, reduced to 10p) was almost spherical,
about the size of a Chinese pear, and coming to a very slight point
where its shape blends into the stalk.

The rind was rather like a fragile orange-coloured eggshell, with a
blush of magenta. The inside was reminiscent of frogspawn with elongated
cells, and the pulp was fragrant, sweet and tasty, and improved a fruit
salad no end - after removing the crunchy tadpoles.

I think I have some of these tadpoles saved somewhere if anyone wants any.

--
Rusty Hinge
No m'lud, it wasn't a sneg. My joints creak.
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Old 18-09-2003, 02:02 PM
Victoria Clare
 
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Default Passion Fruit - When to pick

Jaques d'Altrades wrote in
:

The message . 10
from Victoria Clare contains these words:

I've posted three items to this thread - only the first has appeared
in my downloads.


I can only see your first post, and this one.

I have a theory that P caerulea is a pretty variable plant. For
example, I've seen it described as having no scent, but both of mine
have a gorgeous scent which you can smell right across the patio,
even if only a couple of flowers are out. They are bog standard
plants from a seed packet.


Oh. Could you save me some of your seeds please?


Certainly - when they decide to set fruit, which so far they haven't. But
they are only a couple of years old.

Victoria

--
gardening on a north-facing hill
in South-East Cornwall
--
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Old 18-09-2003, 04:12 PM
Jaques d'Altrades
 
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Default Passion Fruit - When to pick

The message
from Victoria Clare contains these words:

Oh. Could you save me some of your seeds please?


Certainly - when they decide to set fruit, which so far they haven't. But
they are only a couple of years old.


I'll save the post somewhere or other and try to remember to jog your
memory. Ta.

--
Rusty Hinge
No m'lud, it wasn't a sneg. My joints creak.
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Old 18-09-2003, 11:43 PM
Jason Pope
 
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Default Passion fruit - when to pick

jo wrote:
I have a passion flower that has borne a huge number of fruit. Most

of the
fruit are now orange in colour. I have left them on the plant as I

thought
they went brown and crinkly with dry skins (as you buy them in the

shops),
but some are starting to turn mouldy. Any tips?
Jo


If it's a Caerulea passionfruit, they'll stay orange!
Pick them when they are uniformly orange, the fruit doesn't taste to
good though!

If you want an edible passionfruit you need to go for Passiflora edulis,
I have some seeds for auction on ebay!


Cheers

Jason

--
Check out my ebay auctions for Passifora caerulea and edulis seeds
http://cgi6.ebay.co.uk/ws/eBayISAPI....sort=3&rows=50



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