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Old 21-09-2003, 09:07 PM
Zipadee Doodar
 
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Default leylandii in tubs -feasible?

Xref: kermit uk.rec.gardening:166469

I would like a six foot hedge to give me some privacy from my intrusive
neighbour, but am aware of the possible anti-social consequences of a
traditionally planted hedge which grows out of control. Is it feasible to
grow leylandii in tubs to restrict root growth and to make trimming height
easier by leaning the whole thing over? I can see possible problems of
stability in high winds etc, but on the other hand, if they are neglected in
a tub, they cannot grow out of control.

This is a serious question, not a troll. I have a 5 ft ranch fence which is
the pride and joy of my neighbour, even though it is only fit for
firewood. And he is always leaning over it like Chad.

ZD



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Old 21-09-2003, 10:33 PM
Earnest Trawler
 
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Default leylandii in tubs -feasible?

"Zipadee Doodar" wrote in message
...
I would like a six foot hedge to give me some privacy from my intrusive
neighbour, but am aware of the possible anti-social consequences of a
traditionally planted hedge which grows out of control. Is it feasible to
grow leylandii in tubs to restrict root growth and to make trimming height
easier by leaning the whole thing over? I can see possible problems of
stability in high winds etc, but on the other hand, if they are neglected

in
a tub, they cannot grow out of control.

This is a serious question, not a troll. I have a 5 ft ranch fence which

is
the pride and joy of my neighbour, even though it is only fit for
firewood. And he is always leaning over it like Chad.

ZD

It's quite possible to grow them in planters, I have seen a hedge done that
way. In large terracotta planters, the weight of pot and compost would keep
them stable in wind, lifting them would be the problem! Also it could work
out a bit expensive, planters big enough to get a dense six foot hedge would
cost more than the trees.

Earnest.


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Old 22-09-2003, 07:36 AM
Kay Easton
 
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Default leylandii in tubs -feasible?

In article , Zipadee
Doodar writes
I would like a six foot hedge to give me some privacy from my intrusive
neighbour, but am aware of the possible anti-social consequences of a
traditionally planted hedge which grows out of control. Is it feasible to
grow leylandii in tubs to restrict root growth and to make trimming height
easier by leaning the whole thing over?


I wouldn't have though it would be very easy. They are susceptible to
drought, so you would have to keep them watered.

You could try any other evergreen hedge. Yew is slow growing, but if you
have enough spare cash you could buy 6ft high plants to start with
(about 75 quid each IIRC)

Alternatively pyracantha, well chosen roses etc planted next to the
fence would hide the fence a bit and would discourage leaning over,
although it would be such an effective visual screen.


--
Kay Easton

Edward's earthworm page:
http://www.scarboro.demon.co.uk/edward/index.htm
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Old 22-09-2003, 12:04 PM
Franz Heymann
 
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Default leylandii in tubs -feasible?


"Zipadee Doodar" wrote in message
...
I would like a six foot hedge to give me some privacy from my intrusive
neighbour, but am aware of the possible anti-social consequences of a
traditionally planted hedge which grows out of control. Is it feasible to
grow leylandii in tubs to restrict root growth and to make trimming height
easier by leaning the whole thing over? I can see possible problems of
stability in high winds etc, but on the other hand, if they are neglected

in
a tub, they cannot grow out of control.


If they are neglected in a tub, they probably will grow out of control,
because the tub needs drainage holes, and it will not be long before the
Leylandii roots discover the holes.

This is a serious question, not a troll. I have a 5 ft ranch fence which

is
the pride and joy of my neighbour, even though it is only fit for
firewood. And he is always leaning over it like Chad.

Franz


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Old 22-09-2003, 12:04 PM
Franz Heymann
 
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Default leylandii in tubs -feasible?


"Earnest Trawler" wrote in message
...
"Zipadee Doodar" wrote in message
...
I would like a six foot hedge to give me some privacy from my intrusive
neighbour, but am aware of the possible anti-social consequences of a
traditionally planted hedge which grows out of control. Is it feasible

to
grow leylandii in tubs to restrict root growth and to make trimming

height
easier by leaning the whole thing over? I can see possible problems of
stability in high winds etc, but on the other hand, if they are

neglected
in
a tub, they cannot grow out of control.

This is a serious question, not a troll. I have a 5 ft ranch fence which

is
the pride and joy of my neighbour, even though it is only fit for
firewood. And he is always leaning over it like Chad.

ZD

It's quite possible to grow them in planters, I have seen a hedge done

that
way. In large terracotta planters, the weight of pot and compost would

keep
them stable in wind, lifting them would be the problem! Also it could work
out a bit expensive, planters big enough to get a dense six foot hedge

would
cost more than the trees.


Since each tree requires one planter, the ratio of the price of the planters
to that of the trees is independent of the planting density. Having said
that, you are probably right insofar as the cost of the container might well
exceed that of the tree. But that is a problem common to all shrubs or
trees grown in "respectable" containers.

Franz




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Old 22-09-2003, 12:04 PM
Franz Heymann
 
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Default leylandii in tubs -feasible?


"Kay Easton" wrote in message
...
In article , Zipadee
Doodar writes
I would like a six foot hedge to give me some privacy from my intrusive
neighbour, but am aware of the possible anti-social consequences of a
traditionally planted hedge which grows out of control. Is it feasible to
grow leylandii in tubs to restrict root growth and to make trimming

height
easier by leaning the whole thing over?


I wouldn't have though it would be very easy. They are susceptible to
drought, so you would have to keep them watered.

You could try any other evergreen hedge. Yew is slow growing, but if you
have enough spare cash you could buy 6ft high plants to start with
(about 75 quid each IIRC)

Alternatively pyracantha, well chosen roses etc planted next to the
fence would hide the fence a bit and would discourage leaning over,
although it would be such an effective visual screen.


Kay, I presume there is an implied "not" in that last clause.
In that case, disagre with you about Pyracantha. I have a few of these
screening off my oil container in the garden. Within very few years, they
made an excellent 6 ft hedge which does not need to be clipped to topiary
perfection and gived the bonus of red berries in the autumn.

Franz


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Old 22-09-2003, 12:04 PM
Nick Maclaren
 
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Default leylandii in tubs -feasible?


In article ,
"Franz Heymann" writes:
|
| Kay, I presume there is an implied "not" in that last clause.
| In that case, disagre with you about Pyracantha. I have a few of these
| screening off my oil container in the garden. Within very few years, they
| made an excellent 6 ft hedge which does not need to be clipped to topiary
| perfection and gived the bonus of red berries in the autumn.

I got rid of mine, because I was sick of pruning it. If done once
a year, it produced 6' shoots, 3/4" across at the base and with
1" spines which had no problems going through heavy leather gloves.
To keep it under control, it needed pruning 3 times a year.

My guess is that it would be BETTER grown with a restricted root
system!


Regards,
Nick Maclaren.
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Old 22-09-2003, 12:23 PM
Victoria Clare
 
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Default leylandii in tubs -feasible?

(Nick Maclaren) wrote in
:


In article ,
"Franz Heymann" writes:
|
| Kay, I presume there is an implied "not" in that last clause.
| In that case, disagre with you about Pyracantha. I have a few of
| these screening off my oil container in the garden. Within very few
| years, they made an excellent 6 ft hedge which does not need to be
| clipped to topiary perfection and gived the bonus of red berries in
| the autumn.

I got rid of mine, because I was sick of pruning it. If done once
a year, it produced 6' shoots, 3/4" across at the base and with
1" spines which had no problems going through heavy leather gloves.
To keep it under control, it needed pruning 3 times a year.

My guess is that it would be BETTER grown with a restricted root
system!


Yes, definitely. I've got one growing in a strip of earth 6 inches wide by
about 4 feet long, trained against a northfacing wall. It needs clipping
once or twice a year, but is easy enough to keep in order - nothing like as
fast as the 12 foot monster I had in my last garden (which did indeed make
a decent evergreen screen).

I don't think the one-year shoots were ever 3/4" across though - maybe Nick
had a mega-vigorous variety, though I seem to remember I clipped mine
pretty regularly then, so I could take just the soft stuff off, not the
hard woody spikes. I had time to do that sort of thing when I had a small
garden...

Victoria
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Old 22-09-2003, 12:39 PM
Nick Maclaren
 
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Default leylandii in tubs -feasible?


In article ,
Victoria Clare writes:
|
| I don't think the one-year shoots were ever 3/4" across though - maybe Nick
| had a mega-vigorous variety, though I seem to remember I clipped mine
| pretty regularly then, so I could take just the soft stuff off, not the
| hard woody spikes. I had time to do that sort of thing when I had a small
| garden...

No, just ordinary :-)

It was in the open, in very fertile, well-drained soil, in full
light, in one of the parts of the country with warmish summers.
It was also c. 40 years old - I must plane a section of wood I
took (and has now dried) and count the rings.


Regards,
Nick Maclaren.
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Old 22-09-2003, 01:13 PM
JennyC
 
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Default leylandii in tubs -feasible?


"Franz Heymann" wrote
Since each tree requires one planter, the ratio of the price of the

planters
to that of the trees is independent of the planting density. Having

said
that, you are probably right insofar as the cost of the container

might well
exceed that of the tree. But that is a problem common to all shrubs

or
trees grown in "respectable" containers.
Franz


True, but I discovered the 'second hand' pile of pots at my local
garden centre :~))
They supply garden etc and have loads of HUGE pots going for less than
1/4 of the new price. Ok they are not pretty glazed pots, but those
black rubber/plastic ones. I disguise them on my patio and roofgarden
with smaller prettier ones.
I picked up a massive one for my Rhus which has outgrown it's space.

Jenny




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Old 22-09-2003, 02:13 PM
Sad Sid
 
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Default leylandii in tubs -feasible?

. Within very few
| years, they made an excellent 6 ft hedge which does not need to be
| clipped to topiary perfection and gived the bonus of red berries in
| the autumn.

I got rid of mine, because I was sick of pruning it. If done once
a year, it produced 6' shoots, 3/4" across at the base and with
1" spines which had no problems going through heavy leather gloves.
To keep it under control, it needed pruning 3 times a year.

I planted two at my last house. I trained one vertically on an "inside
corner" of the building. When we moved, after eighteen years, it was above
the guttering (2 story house). The other had grown into a very repectable
short hedge which was great for detering the neighbour's kids....


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Old 22-09-2003, 03:33 PM
Franz Heymann
 
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Default leylandii in tubs -feasible?


"JennyC" wrote in message
...

"Franz Heymann" wrote
Since each tree requires one planter, the ratio of the price of the

planters
to that of the trees is independent of the planting density. Having

said
that, you are probably right insofar as the cost of the container

might well
exceed that of the tree. But that is a problem common to all shrubs

or
trees grown in "respectable" containers.
Franz


True, but I discovered the 'second hand' pile of pots at my local
garden centre :~))
They supply garden etc and have loads of HUGE pots going for less than
1/4 of the new price. Ok they are not pretty glazed pots, but those
black rubber/plastic ones. I disguise them on my patio and roofgarden
with smaller prettier ones.
I picked up a massive one for my Rhus which has outgrown it's space.


It sounds as if you are in luck.

Franz


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Old 22-09-2003, 05:22 PM
Tumbleweed
 
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Default leylandii in tubs -feasible?


"Zipadee Doodar" wrote in message
...
I would like a six foot hedge to give me some privacy from my intrusive
neighbour, but am aware of the possible anti-social consequences of a
traditionally planted hedge which grows out of control. Is it feasible to
grow leylandii in tubs to restrict root growth and to make trimming height
easier by leaning the whole thing over? I can see possible problems of
stability in high winds etc, but on the other hand, if they are neglected

in
a tub, they cannot grow out of control.

This is a serious question, not a troll. I have a 5 ft ranch fence which

is
the pride and joy of my neighbour, even though it is only fit for
firewood. And he is always leaning over it like Chad.

ZD

I'd have thought no, far too difficult to keep them watered enough, you only
have to get it wrong once and all your work is toast, and it would also be
quite expensive. Just keep them well trimmed. Or put your own fence in. I
suppose plants would be more subtle as the height would creep up on them
unlike an overnight erected 'berlin wall' :-)


--
Tumbleweed

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