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Old 04-10-2003, 09:34 AM
Eric the Red
 
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Default Alligator saw - valid alternative to chainsaw ?

David, thanks for your comments on the suitability of the alligator saw. I
did see the McCulloch in B&Q as was considering it. Think I'll pop down
there this afternoon and see if they have any left.

Eric



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Old 04-10-2003, 12:22 PM
Nick Maclaren
 
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Default Alligator saw - valid alternative to chainsaw ?

In article ,
Eric the Red wrote:
My reason for not wanting to cut up the trunks has nothing to do with
strength or age more to do with time.

As you say it would be possible to cut them up with a bow saw over a FEW
weekends. I do not really have that much time to spare as I have lots of
other jobs to do round the house before winter starts. Getting the trees all
cut up and disposed of in one day would be well worth the cost of the saw to
me.


Then I STRONGLY suggest ringing around some firewood merchants and
similar, and arranging for them to do it for you. You may well have
to pay, but it is unlikely to be more than the cost of a mechanical
saw!


Regards,
Nick Maclaren.
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Old 04-10-2003, 03:42 PM
Rod Craddock
 
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Default Alligator saw - valid alternative to chainsaw ?

Eric the Red wrote:
I asked a question about budget chainsaws and plus the searches through
newsgroups, the general opinion is don't do it they are too dangerous.



Just to get things in perspective. Chainsaws are not dangerous. In fact
they are inanimate objects quite incapable of harming anything - until
somebody picks them up and starts doing things with them. Maintained and
used correctly they are userfriendly and no more dangerous than many
other power tools. Problems arise now that almost anybody can get hold
of one and start trying to use it even if they have no experience of
power tools, of manual work, of the basics of pruning and felling trees
and cutting logs or any awareness of possible dangers arising from any
of the above. Years ago we learned the principles using hand tools,
slowly over a long period then we began to fit power tools into the job
that we were already skilled in. It's still possible to do that but more
likely that someone will either do a basic course first (OK, if you
don't then go off thinking you know it all - you've only just started on
the learning curve - forget that at your peril) or they will just start
using a saw with no instruction, no idea of how to do the work or of how
to use the saw and with no intention of reading the manual - which
usually covers the basics quite well enough for anyone who is already
experienced in working with trees and preferably in working with other
power tools perhaps in another context.
Compared with the saws I learned with, modern saws are bristling with
safety features like anti - vibration, chain brake, chain catcher
(Franz!) Hand shields, anti-kick chains etc. The operator is equipped
with first class protection for limbs, feet, head, face and hearing - if
you are not then don't touch a chainsaw. Be prepared to pay at least as
much for that kit as you would for a cheapish saw. All of this makes
hiring look more attractive for occasional users because the hire
company will offer a modern professional machine (Usually a cut above
the cheapo saw you might be tempted to buy) and will offer the safety
kit as an optional part of the hire. Don't rely on the hire shop for any
training though - unless things have changed a lot recently you'll just
be shown how to start and stop the machine, how to refuel and how to
adjust the chain.

Rod

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Old 04-10-2003, 06:12 PM
Nic O'Demus
 
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Default Alligator saw - valid alternative to chainsaw ?


"Rod Craddock" wrote in message
...
Eric the Red wrote:
I asked a question about budget chainsaws and plus the searches through
newsgroups, the general opinion is don't do it they are too dangerous.



Just to get things in perspective. Chainsaws are not dangerous. In fact
they are inanimate objects quite incapable of harming anything - until
somebody picks them up and starts doing things with them. Maintained and
used correctly they are userfriendly and no more dangerous than many
other power tools. Problems arise now that almost anybody can get hold
of one and start trying to use it even if they have no experience of
power tools, of manual work, of the basics of pruning and felling trees
and cutting logs or any awareness of possible dangers arising from any
of the above. Years ago we learned the principles using hand tools,
slowly over a long period then we began to fit power tools into the job
that we were already skilled in. It's still possible to do that but more
likely that someone will either do a basic course first (OK, if you
don't then go off thinking you know it all - you've only just started on
the learning curve - forget that at your peril) or they will just start
using a saw with no instruction, no idea of how to do the work or of how
to use the saw and with no intention of reading the manual - which
usually covers the basics quite well enough for anyone who is already
experienced in working with trees and preferably in working with other
power tools perhaps in another context.
Compared with the saws I learned with, modern saws are bristling with
safety features like anti - vibration, chain brake, chain catcher
(Franz!) Hand shields, anti-kick chains etc. The operator is equipped
with first class protection for limbs, feet, head, face and hearing - if
you are not then don't touch a chainsaw. Be prepared to pay at least as
much for that kit as you would for a cheapish saw. All of this makes
hiring look more attractive for occasional users because the hire
company will offer a modern professional machine (Usually a cut above
the cheapo saw you might be tempted to buy) and will offer the safety
kit as an optional part of the hire. Don't rely on the hire shop for any
training though - unless things have changed a lot recently you'll just
be shown how to start and stop the machine, how to refuel and how to
adjust the chain.

Rod

Excellent reply Rod,

I've used chainsaws (private not pro use) for over 30 years and would agree
with all that you have written.
In addition, an alligator saw would be of no use whatsoever. It would
probably struggle to remove smaller limbs from the felled tree, the blades
are hardpoint (so can't be sharpened) and are expensive to replace.
I use a DeWalt alligator saw now and again for rough cutting really light
stuff.
Can chain saws still be hired? I have been told that some hire groups have
dropped them from the available range because of Health & Safety Regs.

Might the OP not consider getting in a pro to drop the trees and cut the
trunks into lengths that can be handled. On a 'when it suits you and I will
clear' basis this would probably not be too expensive. OP could then remove
limbs with a good bowsaw at his own speed and dispose of as he sees fit..

Nic.


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Old 24-04-2008, 08:52 PM
Registered User
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Apr 2008
Posts: 1
Thumbs up

Quote:
Originally Posted by Eric the Red View Post
I asked a question about budget chainsaws and plus the searches through
newsgroups, the general opinion is don't do it they are too dangerous.

Are alligator saws a suitable alternative to a chainsaw ? I have a number of
Leylandii that need choping up and disposing off. Max trunk size just over
12".

The only alligator saw currently available for sale that I can find is the
DeWalt 390 and at just under 200 is more expensive than a budget chainsaw
but if it is much safer then it could be money well spent.

The alligator saw looks like it could have more uses later on.

Anyone got the DeWalt or can recommend/comment on a alligator saw.

Eric.
I HAVE HAD THE ALLIGATER SAW FOR A YEAR NOW AND I;M 50 YEARS YOUNG AND I LOVE IT ITS EASY TO USE ITS LIGHT AND IT CUTS VERY GOOD AND IT GETS IN PLACES THAT A REG CHAINSAW CANT BEST THING I BOUGHT IN A LONG TIME THANK YOU NEVAJANE57 PS IM A LADY!


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