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Old 02-02-2004, 04:15 AM
Jaques d'Alltrades
 
Posts: n/a
Default New build house - garden waterlogging

The message
from Janet Baraclough .. contains
these words:

Btw Scotland is one big standing pool of water this very wet winter.


Janet (Arran)


Come on, Janet: Arran *IS* in the sea......

--
Rusty
Open the creaking gate to make a horrid.squeak, then lower the foobar.
http://www.users.zetnet.co.uk/hi-fi/

  #17   Report Post  
Old 02-02-2004, 04:16 AM
Jaques d'Alltrades
 
Posts: n/a
Default New build house - garden waterlogging

The message
from "KD" contains these words:

Lots of factors are affecting the drainage
and the main problem will be getting the builders to acknowledge that it is
their responsibility to fix it - we simply can't use the garden as it
stands/sinks. We have already had to abandon 3/4 of the planned jobs for
landscaping of the garden due to this waterlogging problem - I just hope
that it can be sorted out. Thanks for all the help so far.


Take photos, especially immediately after rain.

--
Rusty
Open the creaking gate to make a horrid.squeak, then lower the foobar.
http://www.users.zetnet.co.uk/hi-fi/
  #18   Report Post  
Old 02-02-2004, 06:39 AM
Michael Mcneil
 
Posts: n/a
Default New build house - garden waterlogging

"Sarah P" "Sarah wrote in message


Hi all,
Apologies for the X-post but the d.i.y guys always seem to know what's
going on with regard to 'building' regs but the real domain of the
question
is my 'garden'. Basically, I've bought a new house up in Scotland and
the
garden is a bit of a nightmare. The slightest amount of rain results
in
pools of standing water and the newly laid turf is apparently about to
start
rotting. Now a local landscaper has said that the problem can probably
be
rectified but I don't think it should be up to me to pay for this.
The
landscaper also mentioned that standing water should be the
developer's
consideration. How do you think I should approach this - should the
developer be sorting out the drainage or am I stuck with footing the
bill
for this myself ?

Thank for any guidance,
Keith

I rather think that your problem is one of gender ...errrr Sa..err
Kei...err.

Hold everything until you can be sure that the problem isn't temporary.
I've posted the message on to where you can get more immediate help.



--
Posted via Mailgate.ORG Server - http://www.Mailgate.ORG
  #19   Report Post  
Old 02-02-2004, 05:07 PM
Janet Baraclough ..
 
Posts: n/a
Default New build house - garden waterlogging

The message
from Jaques d'Alltrades contains
these words:

The message
from Janet Baraclough .. contains
these words:


Btw Scotland is one big standing pool of water this very wet winter.


Janet (Arran)


Come on, Janet: Arran *IS* in the sea......


BT's fault service asked me if it was reachable by boat, when I rang
them last week :-). But seriously, the OP *may* underestimate the normal
degree of waterlogging to be expected locally, especially if they have
moved here from some arid unnatural place like SE England. It won't help
a genuine case with the developer or contractor, to complain "our garden
is so wet this winter we can't use it or work in it", if she's somewhere
like Fort William and they can justifiably reply "That's perfectly
normal for these parts". My garden is also waterlogged, unusable and
unworkable atm..everyone's is round here, and my last (hillside with
peat)garden on the mainland will be a whole lot worse.

Janet

  #20   Report Post  
Old 02-02-2004, 05:28 PM
Janet Baraclough ..
 
Posts: n/a
Default New build house - garden waterlogging

The message
from Jaques d'Alltrades contains
these words:

The message
from Janet Baraclough .. contains
these words:


Btw Scotland is one big standing pool of water this very wet winter.


Janet (Arran)


Come on, Janet: Arran *IS* in the sea......


BT's fault service asked me if it was reachable by boat, when I rang
them last week :-). But seriously, the OP *may* underestimate the normal
degree of waterlogging to be expected locally, especially if they have
moved here from some arid unnatural place like SE England. It won't help
a genuine case with the developer or contractor, to complain "our garden
is so wet this winter we can't use it or work in it", if she's somewhere
like Fort William and they can justifiably reply "That's perfectly
normal for these parts". My garden is also waterlogged, unusable and
unworkable atm..everyone's is round here, and my last (hillside with
peat)garden on the mainland will be a whole lot worse.

Janet



  #21   Report Post  
Old 02-02-2004, 08:24 PM
David W.E. Roberts
 
Posts: n/a
Default New build house - garden waterlogging

Sarah P/ Keith/ Whatever - please check the date and time on your PC :-)

"Sarah P" munged @ nospam.net wrote in message
...
Hi all,
Apologies for the X-post but the d.i.y guys always seem to know what's
going on with regard to 'building' regs but the real domain of the

question
is my 'garden'. Basically, I've bought a new house up in Scotland and the
garden is a bit of a nightmare. The slightest amount of rain results in
pools of standing water and the newly laid turf is apparently about to

start
rotting. Now a local landscaper has said that the problem can probably be
rectified but I don't think it should be up to me to pay for this. The
landscaper also mentioned that standing water should be the developer's
consideration. How do you think I should approach this - should the
developer be sorting out the drainage or am I stuck with footing the bill
for this myself ?

Thank for any guidance,
Keith




  #22   Report Post  
Old 02-02-2004, 08:46 PM
David W.E. Roberts
 
Posts: n/a
Default New build house - garden waterlogging

Sarah P/ Keith/ Whatever - please check the date and time on your PC :-)

"Sarah P" munged @ nospam.net wrote in message
...
Hi all,
Apologies for the X-post but the d.i.y guys always seem to know what's
going on with regard to 'building' regs but the real domain of the

question
is my 'garden'. Basically, I've bought a new house up in Scotland and the
garden is a bit of a nightmare. The slightest amount of rain results in
pools of standing water and the newly laid turf is apparently about to

start
rotting. Now a local landscaper has said that the problem can probably be
rectified but I don't think it should be up to me to pay for this. The
landscaper also mentioned that standing water should be the developer's
consideration. How do you think I should approach this - should the
developer be sorting out the drainage or am I stuck with footing the bill
for this myself ?

Thank for any guidance,
Keith




  #23   Report Post  
Old 02-02-2004, 08:46 PM
David W.E. Roberts
 
Posts: n/a
Default New build house - garden waterlogging

Sarah P/ Keith/ Whatever - please check the date and time on your PC :-)

"Sarah P" munged @ nospam.net wrote in message
...
Hi all,
Apologies for the X-post but the d.i.y guys always seem to know what's
going on with regard to 'building' regs but the real domain of the

question
is my 'garden'. Basically, I've bought a new house up in Scotland and the
garden is a bit of a nightmare. The slightest amount of rain results in
pools of standing water and the newly laid turf is apparently about to

start
rotting. Now a local landscaper has said that the problem can probably be
rectified but I don't think it should be up to me to pay for this. The
landscaper also mentioned that standing water should be the developer's
consideration. How do you think I should approach this - should the
developer be sorting out the drainage or am I stuck with footing the bill
for this myself ?

Thank for any guidance,
Keith




  #24   Report Post  
Old 02-02-2004, 11:18 PM
KD
 
Posts: n/a
Default New build house - garden waterlogging


"David W.E. Roberts" wrote in message
...
Sarah P/ Keith/ Whatever - please check the date and time on your PC :-)

"Sarah P" munged @ nospam.net wrote in message
...
Hi all,
Apologies for the X-post but the d.i.y guys always seem to know

what's
going on with regard to 'building' regs but the real domain of the

question
is my 'garden'. Basically, I've bought a new house up in Scotland and

the
garden is a bit of a nightmare. The slightest amount of rain results in
pools of standing water and the newly laid turf is apparently about to

start
rotting. Now a local landscaper has said that the problem can probably

be
rectified but I don't think it should be up to me to pay for this. The
landscaper also mentioned that standing water should be the developer's
consideration. How do you think I should approach this - should the
developer be sorting out the drainage or am I stuck with footing the

bill
for this myself ?

Thank for any guidance,
Keith




Hi,
Thanks for the reminder. I'm currently rebuilding the PC and must have put
the date in incorrectly. Sorry.

Keith


  #25   Report Post  
Old 02-02-2004, 11:18 PM
KD
 
Posts: n/a
Default New build house - garden waterlogging


"David W.E. Roberts" wrote in message
...
Sarah P/ Keith/ Whatever - please check the date and time on your PC :-)

"Sarah P" munged @ nospam.net wrote in message
...
Hi all,
Apologies for the X-post but the d.i.y guys always seem to know

what's
going on with regard to 'building' regs but the real domain of the

question
is my 'garden'. Basically, I've bought a new house up in Scotland and

the
garden is a bit of a nightmare. The slightest amount of rain results in
pools of standing water and the newly laid turf is apparently about to

start
rotting. Now a local landscaper has said that the problem can probably

be
rectified but I don't think it should be up to me to pay for this. The
landscaper also mentioned that standing water should be the developer's
consideration. How do you think I should approach this - should the
developer be sorting out the drainage or am I stuck with footing the

bill
for this myself ?

Thank for any guidance,
Keith




Hi,
Thanks for the reminder. I'm currently rebuilding the PC and must have put
the date in incorrectly. Sorry.

Keith




  #26   Report Post  
Old 02-02-2004, 11:18 PM
KD
 
Posts: n/a
Default New build house - garden waterlogging


"Peter Taylor" wrote in message
...
Keith wrote

Hi all,
Apologies for the X-post but the d.i.y guys always seem to know

what's
going on with regard to 'building' regs but the real domain of the

question
is my 'garden'. Basically, I've bought a new house up in Scotland and

the
garden is a bit of a nightmare. The slightest amount of rain results in
pools of standing water and the newly laid turf is apparently about to

start
rotting. Now a local landscaper has said that the problem can probably

be
rectified but I don't think it should be up to me to pay for this. The
landscaper also mentioned that standing water should be the developer's
consideration. How do you think I should approach this - should the
developer be sorting out the drainage or am I stuck with footing the

bill
for this myself ?

Thank for any guidance,
Keith



Nobody has mentioned NHBC yet. During the first two years from

completion,
assuming you have Buildmark cover and subject to certain exclusions, the

builder
is supposed to correct any defects free of charge. Your first point of

contact
is the builder but if there is a dispute or if the builder fails to act

then
NHBC Claims will take it on.

The Buildmark policy document http://www.nhbc.co.uk/pdf/policy1.pdf
expressly excludes "loss or damage resulting solely from flooding from

whatever
source or from a change in the water table level". However I would argue

your
problem is more to do with waterlogged soil and drainage than with

flooding.
The NHBC Standards require developers to carry out a thorough site

investigation
before commencing on specific design work, and particularly warns about

adequate
drainage to cope with waterlogged soil.

This is the URL concerning making NHBC Claims
http://www.nhbc.co.uk/index3.asp?pag...teps&col=green

Good luck
Peter

Hi Peter,
I look at the NHBC as kind of the last resort. I am chiefly trying to
find out how much of an argument I'm likely to get with the developer about
this before having to approach the NHBC. Thanks for the info though.

Cheers,
Keith


  #27   Report Post  
Old 02-02-2004, 11:18 PM
KD
 
Posts: n/a
Default New build house - garden waterlogging


"Peter Taylor" wrote in message
...
Keith wrote

Hi all,
Apologies for the X-post but the d.i.y guys always seem to know

what's
going on with regard to 'building' regs but the real domain of the

question
is my 'garden'. Basically, I've bought a new house up in Scotland and

the
garden is a bit of a nightmare. The slightest amount of rain results in
pools of standing water and the newly laid turf is apparently about to

start
rotting. Now a local landscaper has said that the problem can probably

be
rectified but I don't think it should be up to me to pay for this. The
landscaper also mentioned that standing water should be the developer's
consideration. How do you think I should approach this - should the
developer be sorting out the drainage or am I stuck with footing the

bill
for this myself ?

Thank for any guidance,
Keith



Nobody has mentioned NHBC yet. During the first two years from

completion,
assuming you have Buildmark cover and subject to certain exclusions, the

builder
is supposed to correct any defects free of charge. Your first point of

contact
is the builder but if there is a dispute or if the builder fails to act

then
NHBC Claims will take it on.

The Buildmark policy document http://www.nhbc.co.uk/pdf/policy1.pdf
expressly excludes "loss or damage resulting solely from flooding from

whatever
source or from a change in the water table level". However I would argue

your
problem is more to do with waterlogged soil and drainage than with

flooding.
The NHBC Standards require developers to carry out a thorough site

investigation
before commencing on specific design work, and particularly warns about

adequate
drainage to cope with waterlogged soil.

This is the URL concerning making NHBC Claims
http://www.nhbc.co.uk/index3.asp?pag...teps&col=green

Good luck
Peter

Hi Peter,
I look at the NHBC as kind of the last resort. I am chiefly trying to
find out how much of an argument I'm likely to get with the developer about
this before having to approach the NHBC. Thanks for the info though.

Cheers,
Keith


  #28   Report Post  
Old 02-02-2004, 11:18 PM
Jaques d'Alltrades
 
Posts: n/a
Default New build house - garden waterlogging

The message
from Janet Baraclough .. contains
these words:

BT's fault service asked me if it was reachable by boat, when I rang
them last week :-). But seriously, the OP *may* underestimate the normal
degree of waterlogging to be expected locally, especially if they have
moved here from some arid unnatural place like SE England.


Oy! I represent that remark!

It won't help
a genuine case with the developer or contractor, to complain "our garden
is so wet this winter we can't use it or work in it", if she's somewhere
like Fort William and they can justifiably reply "That's perfectly
normal for these parts". My garden is also waterlogged, unusable and
unworkable atm..everyone's is round here, and my last (hillside with
peat)garden on the mainland will be a whole lot worse.


However, having lived for differing periods in Perthshire, Angus, in the
Monadhliaths and on the Isle of Lewis I do understand the meaning of
water in all its forms. I have seen quite a lot of it.

--
Rusty
Open the creaking gate to make a horrid.squeak, then lower the foobar.
http://www.users.zetnet.co.uk/hi-fi/
  #29   Report Post  
Old 02-02-2004, 11:18 PM
Jaques d'Alltrades
 
Posts: n/a
Default New build house - garden waterlogging

The message
from Janet Baraclough .. contains
these words:

BT's fault service asked me if it was reachable by boat, when I rang
them last week :-). But seriously, the OP *may* underestimate the normal
degree of waterlogging to be expected locally, especially if they have
moved here from some arid unnatural place like SE England.


Oy! I represent that remark!

It won't help
a genuine case with the developer or contractor, to complain "our garden
is so wet this winter we can't use it or work in it", if she's somewhere
like Fort William and they can justifiably reply "That's perfectly
normal for these parts". My garden is also waterlogged, unusable and
unworkable atm..everyone's is round here, and my last (hillside with
peat)garden on the mainland will be a whole lot worse.


However, having lived for differing periods in Perthshire, Angus, in the
Monadhliaths and on the Isle of Lewis I do understand the meaning of
water in all its forms. I have seen quite a lot of it.

--
Rusty
Open the creaking gate to make a horrid.squeak, then lower the foobar.
http://www.users.zetnet.co.uk/hi-fi/
  #30   Report Post  
Old 03-02-2004, 11:32 PM
KD
 
Posts: n/a
Default New build house - garden waterlogging


"Sarah P" munged @ nospam.net wrote in message
...
Hi all,
Apologies for the X-post but the d.i.y guys always seem to know what's
going on with regard to 'building' regs but the real domain of the

question
is my 'garden'. Basically, I've bought a new house up in Scotland and the
garden is a bit of a nightmare. The slightest amount of rain results in
pools of standing water and the newly laid turf is apparently about to

start
rotting. Now a local landscaper has said that the problem can probably be
rectified but I don't think it should be up to me to pay for this. The
landscaper also mentioned that standing water should be the developer's
consideration. How do you think I should approach this - should the
developer be sorting out the drainage or am I stuck with footing the bill
for this myself ?

Thank for any guidance,
Keith


Hi all,
Just to let you know that I received a reply from the NHBC stating that
if waterlogging was present within a 3 metre boundary from the house then
the builder was obliged to put this right - otherwise tough luck.

Keith




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