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Old 27-02-2004, 11:22 PM
klara King
 
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In message , Nick Wagg
writes
We've never seen two robins at the same time in our garden.


I have on only one occasion, when they were obviously fighting to the
death.


We have six on the bird table - they don't really get on, but no fights
to the death.
Well, we had six. I was watching one distinctive one recently: very slim
and a bit dimmer than the rest - my favourite really. As I watched, the
sparrowhawk took it.
Now we have five (

Klara

--
damp and cold in Gatwick basin
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Old 27-02-2004, 11:22 PM
klara King
 
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In message , Nick Wagg
writes
We've never seen two robins at the same time in our garden.


I have on only one occasion, when they were obviously fighting to the
death.


We have six on the bird table - they don't really get on, but no fights
to the death.
Well, we had six. I was watching one distinctive one recently: very slim
and a bit dimmer than the rest - my favourite really. As I watched, the
sparrowhawk took it.
Now we have five (

Klara

--
damp and cold in Gatwick basin
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Old 27-02-2004, 11:23 PM
shazzbat
 
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The male in the "copse-end" pair is very distinctive because he is mottled
white. (Melanistic?)
We have seen three together on occasions - probably offspring rather than
pairs mingling.

Educate me if you will. How do you tell the sexes apart in robins. I'm
assuming both have the red breast.

TIA

Steve




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Old 27-02-2004, 11:23 PM
shazzbat
 
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The male in the "copse-end" pair is very distinctive because he is mottled
white. (Melanistic?)
We have seen three together on occasions - probably offspring rather than
pairs mingling.

Educate me if you will. How do you tell the sexes apart in robins. I'm
assuming both have the red breast.

TIA

Steve


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Old 28-02-2004, 09:13 AM
Sue da Nimm
 
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"shazzbat" wrote in message
...

The male in the "copse-end" pair is very distinctive because he is

mottled
white. (Melanistic?)
We have seen three together on occasions - probably offspring rather

than
pairs mingling.

Educate me if you will. How do you tell the sexes apart in robins. I'm
assuming both have the red breast.

TIA

Steve

An asssumption based on their behaviour. They nest in an old miniiature milk
churn which is embedded in a holly hedge in front of the copse. (It's also
just two metres from the compost heaps!) The mottled white Robin tended to
do all the "grubbing about" when they were hatching off last year and was
seen to feed its partner. So we guessed it was the male. Could easily be
wrong in this era of equal opportunity for the sexes!


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Old 28-02-2004, 06:53 PM
Jaques d'Alltrades
 
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The message
from "Sue da Nimm" . contains these words:

Educate me if you will. How do you tell the sexes apart in robins. I'm
assuming both have the red breast.

TIA

Steve

An asssumption based on their behaviour. They nest in an old miniiature milk
churn which is embedded in a holly hedge in front of the copse. (It's also
just two metres from the compost heaps!) The mottled white Robin tended to
do all the "grubbing about" when they were hatching off last year and was
seen to feed its partner. So we guessed it was the male. Could easily be
wrong in this era of equal opportunity for the sexes!


My bird book says the adults are alike, though amounts of red can vary
between individuals, so no help there.

However, it does say that the female sits on the eggs and is fed by the
male, so your guess seems to be correct.

--
Rusty
Open the creaking gate to make a horrid.squeak, then lower the foobar.
http://www.users.zetnet.co.uk/hi-fi/
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Old 28-02-2004, 06:53 PM
Jaques d'Alltrades
 
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The message
from "Sue da Nimm" . contains these words:

Educate me if you will. How do you tell the sexes apart in robins. I'm
assuming both have the red breast.

TIA

Steve

An asssumption based on their behaviour. They nest in an old miniiature milk
churn which is embedded in a holly hedge in front of the copse. (It's also
just two metres from the compost heaps!) The mottled white Robin tended to
do all the "grubbing about" when they were hatching off last year and was
seen to feed its partner. So we guessed it was the male. Could easily be
wrong in this era of equal opportunity for the sexes!


My bird book says the adults are alike, though amounts of red can vary
between individuals, so no help there.

However, it does say that the female sits on the eggs and is fed by the
male, so your guess seems to be correct.

--
Rusty
Open the creaking gate to make a horrid.squeak, then lower the foobar.
http://www.users.zetnet.co.uk/hi-fi/
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Old 28-02-2004, 06:53 PM
Jaques d'Alltrades
 
Posts: n/a
Default grubs

The message
from "Sue da Nimm" . contains these words:

Educate me if you will. How do you tell the sexes apart in robins. I'm
assuming both have the red breast.

TIA

Steve

An asssumption based on their behaviour. They nest in an old miniiature milk
churn which is embedded in a holly hedge in front of the copse. (It's also
just two metres from the compost heaps!) The mottled white Robin tended to
do all the "grubbing about" when they were hatching off last year and was
seen to feed its partner. So we guessed it was the male. Could easily be
wrong in this era of equal opportunity for the sexes!


My bird book says the adults are alike, though amounts of red can vary
between individuals, so no help there.

However, it does say that the female sits on the eggs and is fed by the
male, so your guess seems to be correct.

--
Rusty
Open the creaking gate to make a horrid.squeak, then lower the foobar.
http://www.users.zetnet.co.uk/hi-fi/


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Old 28-02-2004, 06:53 PM
martin
 
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On Sat, 28 Feb 2004 13:34:05 GMT, Jaques d'Alltrades
wrote:

My bird book says the adults are alike, though amounts of red can vary
between individuals, so no help there.

However, it does say that the female sits on the eggs and is fed by the
male, so your guess seems to be correct.


My bird book says that there is another bird that looks a bit like a
robin, so that might explain the garden with six robins in it.
--

Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit;
Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad
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Old 28-02-2004, 06:54 PM
martin
 
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On Sat, 28 Feb 2004 13:34:05 GMT, Jaques d'Alltrades
wrote:

My bird book says the adults are alike, though amounts of red can vary
between individuals, so no help there.

However, it does say that the female sits on the eggs and is fed by the
male, so your guess seems to be correct.


My bird book says that there is another bird that looks a bit like a
robin, so that might explain the garden with six robins in it.
--

Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit;
Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad
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Old 28-02-2004, 06:54 PM
klara King
 
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martin writes

My bird book says that there is another bird that looks a bit like a
robin, so that might explain the garden with six robins in it.


Well, unless they look *exactly* like a robin ... They've been around
and under the bird table all day, though never two on the table at the
same time. Maybe a cock and his harem?
Must be my delicious fat/ground peanut/seed mix!
Klara

--
damp and cold in Gatwick basin
  #59   Report Post  
Old 28-02-2004, 06:54 PM
klara King
 
Posts: n/a
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martin writes

My bird book says that there is another bird that looks a bit like a
robin, so that might explain the garden with six robins in it.


Well, unless they look *exactly* like a robin ... They've been around
and under the bird table all day, though never two on the table at the
same time. Maybe a cock and his harem?
Must be my delicious fat/ground peanut/seed mix!
Klara

--
damp and cold in Gatwick basin
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Old 28-02-2004, 06:54 PM
martin
 
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On Sat, 28 Feb 2004 17:25:18 +0000, klara King
wrote:

martin writes

My bird book says that there is another bird that looks a bit like a
robin, so that might explain the garden with six robins in it.


Well, unless they look *exactly* like a robin ... They've been around
and under the bird table all day, though never two on the table at the
same time. Maybe a cock and his harem?
Must be my delicious fat/ground peanut/seed mix!


I think you have more than your fair share and I am jealous :-)
--

Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit;
Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad


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