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Old 25-07-2004, 10:04 PM
Mike Lyle
 
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Default Wild wild rocket

If I get it wrong when using my field guide to identify wild rocket
(actually, in my Collins FG, 'Hedge mustard' is what they call
Sisymbrium officinale, which in turn is what the Internet seems to
call 'wild rocket'), eating the wrong close relative won't do me any
harm, will it?

Mike.

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Old 25-07-2004, 10:28 PM
Broadback
 
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Default Wild wild rocket

Mike Lyle wrote:

SNIP 'wild rocket'), eating the wrong close relative won't do me any
harm, will it?


How strange you should say that, I was wandering through our local
graveyard, and that was almost exactly the inscription on a tombstone! ;-)

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Old 25-07-2004, 11:03 PM
Broadback
 
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Default Wild wild rocket

Mike Lyle wrote:

SNIP 'wild rocket'), eating the wrong close relative won't do me any
harm, will it?


How strange you should say that, I was wandering through our local
graveyard, and that was almost exactly the inscription on a tombstone! ;-)

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Old 26-07-2004, 12:03 AM
Phil L
 
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Default Wild wild rocket

Mike Lyle wrote:
:: If I get it wrong when using my field guide to identify wild rocket
:: (actually, in my Collins FG, 'Hedge mustard' is what they call
:: Sisymbrium officinale, which in turn is what the Internet seems to
:: call 'wild rocket'), eating the wrong close relative won't do me
:: any harm, will it?
::
:: Mike.

Lots of plants have very potent toxins in them...TBH, I wouldn't take the
risk unless you are *positive* that what you are getting is the actual plant
you are looking for - many 'similar' looking plants are in fact deadly!
this link has many photographs of Sisymbrium officinale, whether this *is*
wild rocket, I do not know!
http://makeashorterlink.com/?A30D253E8

HTH


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Old 26-07-2004, 12:24 PM
Kay
 
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Default Wild wild rocket

In article , Phil L
writes
Mike Lyle wrote:
:: If I get it wrong when using my field guide to identify wild rocket
:: (actually, in my Collins FG, 'Hedge mustard' is what they call
:: Sisymbrium officinale, which in turn is what the Internet seems to
:: call 'wild rocket'), eating the wrong close relative won't do me
:: any harm, will it?
::
:: Mike.

Lots of plants have very potent toxins in them...TBH, I wouldn't take the
risk unless you are *positive* that what you are getting is the actual plant
you are looking for - many 'similar' looking plants are in fact deadly!


Which are you thinking of? I'd always thought of the Cruciferae as one
of the less hazardous families - though I'd not recommend the OP to
experiment as I'm not 100% sure on this point.
--
Kay
"Do not insult the crocodile until you have crossed the river"



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Old 26-07-2004, 01:03 PM
Kay
 
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Default Wild wild rocket

In article , Phil L
writes
Mike Lyle wrote:
:: If I get it wrong when using my field guide to identify wild rocket
:: (actually, in my Collins FG, 'Hedge mustard' is what they call
:: Sisymbrium officinale, which in turn is what the Internet seems to
:: call 'wild rocket'), eating the wrong close relative won't do me
:: any harm, will it?
::
:: Mike.

Lots of plants have very potent toxins in them...TBH, I wouldn't take the
risk unless you are *positive* that what you are getting is the actual plant
you are looking for - many 'similar' looking plants are in fact deadly!


Which are you thinking of? I'd always thought of the Cruciferae as one
of the less hazardous families - though I'd not recommend the OP to
experiment as I'm not 100% sure on this point.
--
Kay
"Do not insult the crocodile until you have crossed the river"

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Old 26-07-2004, 01:49 PM
Nick Maclaren
 
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Default Wild wild rocket


In article ,
"Phil L" writes:
| Kay wrote:
| ::
| :: Which are you thinking of? I'd always thought of the Cruciferae as
| :: one of the less hazardous families - though I'd not recommend the
| :: OP to experiment as I'm not 100% sure on this point.
|
| some types of mustard are toxic, at least the seeds and pods, although not
| deadly, a severe case of gastroenteritis will follow their consumption.
| http://www.aun.edu.eg/distance/pharm...s_brassica.htm

Er, "severe"? Almost certainly mild. And you are likely to be warned
by the very strong burning sensation, which is what mustard is all
about! Furthermore, the damage isn't likely to be permanent. Unless
you go bonkers, either with quantity or ignoring danger signs, this
isn't likely to be a major risk. But care is indicated.

DON'T fool with the Solanaceae or Fabaceae/Leguminoseae, as those are
SERIOUSLY risky, often with one part of a plant being used as food
and another part being lethal, and so on.

| There are also many hedgerow plants which are easily mistaken for herbs...as
| nearly all plants have some effect on the human body, it's definately not
| safe to pick those that 'resemble' safe ones.

Many herbs' flavourings are indications of sub-clinical levels of
toxins. Such as mustard :-)


Regards,
Nick Maclaren.
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Old 26-07-2004, 02:02 PM
Phil L
 
Posts: n/a
Default Wild wild rocket

Kay wrote:
:: In article , Phil
:: L writes
::: Mike Lyle wrote:
::::: If I get it wrong when using my field guide to identify wild
::::: rocket (actually, in my Collins FG, 'Hedge mustard' is what
::::: they call Sisymbrium officinale, which in turn is what the
::::: Internet seems to call 'wild rocket'), eating the wrong close
::::: relative won't do me any harm, will it?
:::::
::::: Mike.
:::
::: Lots of plants have very potent toxins in them...TBH, I wouldn't
::: take the risk unless you are *positive* that what you are getting
::: is the actual plant you are looking for - many 'similar' looking
::: plants are in fact deadly!
::
:: Which are you thinking of? I'd always thought of the Cruciferae as
:: one of the less hazardous families - though I'd not recommend the
:: OP to experiment as I'm not 100% sure on this point.

some types of mustard are toxic, at least the seeds and pods, although not
deadly, a severe case of gastroenteritis will follow their consumption.
http://www.aun.edu.eg/distance/pharm...s_brassica.htm

There are also many hedgerow plants which are easily mistaken for herbs...as
nearly all plants have some effect on the human body, it's definately not
safe to pick those that 'resemble' safe ones.


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Old 26-07-2004, 02:02 PM
Nick Maclaren
 
Posts: n/a
Default Wild wild rocket


In article ,
"Phil L" writes:
| Kay wrote:
| ::
| :: Which are you thinking of? I'd always thought of the Cruciferae as
| :: one of the less hazardous families - though I'd not recommend the
| :: OP to experiment as I'm not 100% sure on this point.
|
| some types of mustard are toxic, at least the seeds and pods, although not
| deadly, a severe case of gastroenteritis will follow their consumption.
| http://www.aun.edu.eg/distance/pharm...s_brassica.htm

Er, "severe"? Almost certainly mild. And you are likely to be warned
by the very strong burning sensation, which is what mustard is all
about! Furthermore, the damage isn't likely to be permanent. Unless
you go bonkers, either with quantity or ignoring danger signs, this
isn't likely to be a major risk. But care is indicated.

DON'T fool with the Solanaceae or Fabaceae/Leguminoseae, as those are
SERIOUSLY risky, often with one part of a plant being used as food
and another part being lethal, and so on.

| There are also many hedgerow plants which are easily mistaken for herbs...as
| nearly all plants have some effect on the human body, it's definately not
| safe to pick those that 'resemble' safe ones.

Many herbs' flavourings are indications of sub-clinical levels of
toxins. Such as mustard :-)


Regards,
Nick Maclaren.
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Old 26-07-2004, 04:02 PM
Mike Lyle
 
Posts: n/a
Default Wild wild rocket

"Phil L" wrote in message ...
Mike Lyle wrote:
:: If I get it wrong when using my field guide to identify wild rocket
:: (actually, in my Collins FG, 'Hedge mustard' is what they call
:: Sisymbrium officinale, which in turn is what the Internet seems to
:: call 'wild rocket'), eating the wrong close relative won't do me
:: any harm, will it?
::
:: Mike.

Lots of plants have very potent toxins in them...TBH, I wouldn't take the
risk unless you are *positive* that what you are getting is the actual plant
you are looking for - many 'similar' looking plants are in fact deadly!
this link has many photographs of Sisymbrium officinale, whether this *is*
wild rocket, I do not know!
http://makeashorterlink.com/?A30D253E8

HTH


Thanks; I've been there, though. And, no, I don't take these risks,
being a fully paid-up member of the Amalgamated Union of Craven
Cowards and Allied Trades.

Can we narrow it down a bit? I'm confident of my ability to identify a
cabbagey-mustardy crucifer in the field, but not necessarily certain
of the species. Are there any of these which would be toxic in normal
salad use?

The HMSO _British Poisonous Plants_ is written from a vet point of
view, and puts several crucifers in the frame; but they don't seem to
have killed stock except when mature plants had been eaten in large
quantities. (Pigs were killed by only two ounces or so of horseradish
root: but just _smelling_ that much horseradish might kill me!) Even
rape, whose seedlings we eat without ill effect as a salading, is only
to be trusted for cattle under certain conditions.

Mike.


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Old 26-07-2004, 04:03 PM
Phil L
 
Posts: n/a
Default Wild wild rocket

Mike Lyle wrote:
:: "Phil L" wrote in message
:: ...
::: Mike Lyle wrote:
::::: If I get it wrong when using my field guide to identify wild
::::: rocket (actually, in my Collins FG, 'Hedge mustard' is what
::::: they call Sisymbrium officinale, which in turn is what the
::::: Internet seems to call 'wild rocket'), eating the wrong close
::::: relative won't do me any harm, will it?
:::::
::::: Mike.
:::
::: Lots of plants have very potent toxins in them...TBH, I wouldn't
::: take the risk unless you are *positive* that what you are getting
::: is the actual plant you are looking for - many 'similar' looking
::: plants are in fact deadly! this link has many photographs of
::: Sisymbrium officinale, whether this *is* wild rocket, I do not
::: know!
::: http://makeashorterlink.com/?A30D253E8
:::
::: HTH
::
:: Thanks; I've been there, though. And, no, I don't take these risks,
:: being a fully paid-up member of the Amalgamated Union of Craven
:: Cowards and Allied Trades.
::
welcome to the club!

:: Can we narrow it down a bit? I'm confident of my ability to
:: identify a
:: cabbagey-mustardy crucifer in the field, but not necessarily
:: certain
:: of the species. Are there any of these which would be toxic in
:: normal
:: salad use?
::
:: The HMSO _British Poisonous Plants_ is written from a vet point of
:: view, and puts several crucifers in the frame; but they don't seem
:: to
:: have killed stock except when mature plants had been eaten in large
:: quantities. (Pigs were killed by only two ounces or so of
:: horseradish
:: root: but just _smelling_ that much horseradish might kill me!)
:: Even
:: rape, whose seedlings we eat without ill effect as a salading, is
:: only
:: to be trusted for cattle under certain conditions.

This is the crux of the problem, it seems that most of these instances of
toxicity are only recorded WRT cattle, horses etc etc- this doesn't always
apply to humans though...certain plants which are highly toxic to one
species are harmless and even beneficial to another....the short answer is
'I do not know', but safe to say that while none of them are likely to kill
you, the worst you could expect is stomach ache if you do happen upon 'a bad
one' - personally, I wouldn't take a risk, but it's up to you.


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Old 26-07-2004, 04:03 PM
Nick Maclaren
 
Posts: n/a
Default Wild wild rocket


In article ,
"Phil L" writes:
|
| This is the crux of the problem, it seems that most of these instances of
| toxicity are only recorded WRT cattle, horses etc etc- this doesn't always
| apply to humans though...certain plants which are highly toxic to one
| species are harmless and even beneficial to another....the short answer is
| 'I do not know', but safe to say that while none of them are likely to kill
| you, the worst you could expect is stomach ache if you do happen upon 'a bad
| one' - personally, I wouldn't take a risk, but it's up to you.

That is why I am perfectly happy to try wild Cruciferae, but not
Solanaceae or (for that matter) Pot Noodles.


Regards,
Nick Maclaren.
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Old 26-07-2004, 11:03 PM
datsy
 
Posts: n/a
Default Wild wild rocket



....
If I get it wrong when using my field guide to identify wild rocket
(actually, in my Collins FG, 'Hedge mustard' is what they call
Sisymbrium officinale, which in turn is what the Internet seems to
call 'wild rocket'), eating the wrong close relative won't do me any
harm, will it?


Just as a matter of interest, why is "wild rocket" in the supermarket called
"wild rocket" in the first place??


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Old 27-07-2004, 10:02 AM
 
Posts: n/a
Default Wild wild rocket

On Mon, 26 Jul 2004 22:59:56 +0100, "datsy"
wrote:



...
If I get it wrong when using my field guide to identify wild rocket
(actually, in my Collins FG, 'Hedge mustard' is what they call
Sisymbrium officinale, which in turn is what the Internet seems to
call 'wild rocket'), eating the wrong close relative won't do me any
harm, will it?


Just as a matter of interest, why is "wild rocket" in the supermarket called
"wild rocket" in the first place??

Perhaps because that's it's common name?
http://seeds.thompson-morgan.com/us/.../705/1?SA=1113

and
http://www-ang.kfunigraz.ac.at/~katz...?Eruc_sat.html
--
Martin
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