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Old 31-08-2004, 01:43 PM
Cat
 
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Default Winter veg

So, here I am, a most inexperienced gardener, with a lovely cabbage patch
and nothing in it yet.
I want to establish a few crowns of rhubarb and asparagus (I would'nt *kill*
for asparagus, but would probably gouge an eye out or two), and wonder
whether now is the time to plant those?
Also, I am looking for slightly unusual (i.e. not readily available in
shops) but easily grown veg I could put in right away for either Winter or
Spring?
Could anyone suggest a few things?
I feel that I am not contributing much to this newsgroup, and mostly pump it
for info.. but if I do start getting into this gardening lark, who knows, I
might just morph into a fountain of knowledge...
Meanwhile, many thanks for any assistance!

--
Cat(h)
The world swirls...




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Old 31-08-2004, 04:11 PM
Gary Woods
 
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"Cat" wrote:

I want to establish a few crowns of rhubarb and asparagus (I would'nt *kill*
for asparagus, but would probably gouge an eye out or two), and wonder
whether now is the time to plant those?


Both those are usually planted from crowns in the spring. I'm a big fan of
growing asparagus from seed in a nursery bed; "costs" an extra season, but
you get much better plants at much lower cost.

Also, I am looking for slightly unusual (i.e. not readily available in
shops) but easily grown veg I could put in right away for either Winter or
Spring?


Folks is the UK can probably be of more help; I think many overwinter Fava
beans which I, in the American colonies, cannot.


Gary Woods AKA K2AHC- PGP key on request, or at home.earthlink.net/~garygarlic
Zone 5/6 in upstate New York, 1420' elevation. NY WO G
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Old 31-08-2004, 05:06 PM
griz
 
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Gary Woods wrote:

"Cat" wrote:

I want to establish a few crowns of rhubarb and asparagus (I would'nt *kill*
for asparagus, but would probably gouge an eye out or two), and wonder
whether now is the time to plant those?


Both those are usually planted from crowns in the spring. I'm a big fan of
growing asparagus from seed in a nursery bed; "costs" an extra season, but
you get much better plants at much lower cost.


I hoped to do the same, but I've not had any success. I had an old packet
of asparagus seeds (cannot remember which variety) and tried sowing them in
the greenhouse a few times this year, but none germinated. Used a seed
tray, small pots, standard potting compost, home made compost, nothing.

Should I sow them outside, when, and any recommendations of which variety
to use

Any advice would be greatly appreciated
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Old 31-08-2004, 05:22 PM
Gary Woods
 
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griz wrote:

I hoped to do the same, but I've not had any success. I had an old packet
of asparagus seeds (cannot remember which variety) and tried sowing them in
the greenhouse a few times this year, but none germinated.


Germinates easily, though slowly (a couple weeks, give or take). When I
did plants in a nursery bed, I started indoors in the winter, transplanted
into a nursery bed 6X6", in the spring, then into a permanent bed the next
spring. Your 1 year old plants should make fist-sized crowns with that
treatment.

I defer to the UK locals on varieties...


Gary Woods AKA K2AHC- PGP key on request, or at home.earthlink.net/~garygarlic
Zone 5/6 in upstate New York, 1420' elevation. NY WO G
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Old 31-08-2004, 05:36 PM
Max Wright
 
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"Cat" wrote:

Also, I am looking for slightly unusual (i.e. not readily available in
shops) but easily grown veg I could put in right away for either Winter or
Spring?



Try oriental greens such as mizuna, green-in-snow and giant red mustard.
These will normally produce usable leaves before winter sets in and,
depending on conditions, may well continue yielding modest pickings
right through into spring. Turnip tops develop quickly and are good
stir-fried. I'd also recommend some slightly less exotic winter salads
such as land cress, lamb's lettuce and various chicories. These are all
pretty easy to grow. Chard may still be worth sowing now but will
probably only really get going next spring. The further north you are
(I'm in London myself) the more beneficial it may be to give the plants
some protection using horticultural fleece or plastic.

--
Max Wright
www.wys-systems.demon.co.uk/plotcrop


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Old 31-08-2004, 05:55 PM
Kay
 
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In article , Cat
writes
I feel that I am not contributing much to this newsgroup, and mostly pump it
for info..


You're contributing by asking questions - it's not just you who will
learn from the answers, but all of us.

--
Kay
"Do not insult the crocodile until you have crossed the river"

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Old 31-08-2004, 06:01 PM
Cat
 
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"Kay" wrote in message
...
In article , Cat
writes
I feel that I am not contributing much to this newsgroup, and mostly pump

it
for info..


You're contributing by asking questions - it's not just you who will
learn from the answers, but all of us.


Thank you :-) that's a generous way of looking at it.

--
Cat(h)
The world swirls...




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