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Old 02-09-2004, 07:39 PM
Ian Waddell
 
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Default Honeysuckle - strange question




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Old 02-09-2004, 07:42 PM
Ian Waddell
 
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Hmmm, bit too swift with the send button!

Basically I've cut down some very dense growth of honeysuckle that I
*thought* was growing from our garden. Whilst I was doing this the
neighbour behind us informed me that it has grown from the neighbour to our
side.

Now, I'm planning to cut it back to their border, and erect a fence - but
besides regular pruning does anyone have any tips on how to stop it growing
back over?

TIA

Ian


"Ian Waddell" wrote in message
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Old 02-09-2004, 07:54 PM
Kate Morgan
 
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Basically I've cut down some very dense growth of honeysuckle that I
*thought* was growing from our garden. Whilst I was doing this the
neighbour behind us informed me that it has grown from the neighbour to our
side.

Now, I'm planning to cut it back to their border, and erect a fence - but
besides regular pruning does anyone have any tips on how to stop it growing
back over?

Is it very important that you stop it growing over? we have some that
grows from our neighbours garden and it is splendid.

kate
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Old 02-09-2004, 08:03 PM
Aardvark
 
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On Thu, 2 Sep 2004 19:42:45 +0100, "Ian Waddell"
wrote:

Hmmm, bit too swift with the send button!

Basically I've cut down some very dense growth of honeysuckle that I
*thought* was growing from our garden. Whilst I was doing this the
neighbour behind us informed me that it has grown from the neighbour to our
side.

Now, I'm planning to cut it back to their border, and erect a fence - but
besides regular pruning does anyone have any tips on how to stop it growing
back over?



What are you hoping to achieve with your garden, a wasteland? Plants
are natural things that do not live by the same rules as us. If they
fancy growing over a fence, then thats just what they will do.
Regardless of whose fence it is and which side of the fence they are
supposed to stay on.

I like it when neighbours plant climbing plants on the shady side of
their garden. The climber races up to the sunlight and spills over
the fence normally giving a nice display of flowers and growth,
without the need for maintenance.

You could build your fence so high that the Honeysuckle cannot get
over. Or go down the garden and give it a good stern talking to.

Phil


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Old 02-09-2004, 08:19 PM
Phil L
 
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Aardvark wrote:
:: On Thu, 2 Sep 2004 19:42:45 +0100, "Ian Waddell"
:: wrote:
::
::: Hmmm, bit too swift with the send button!
:::
::: Basically I've cut down some very dense growth of honeysuckle
::: that I *thought* was growing from our garden. Whilst I was doing
::: this the neighbour behind us informed me that it has grown from
::: the neighbour to our side.
:::
::: Now, I'm planning to cut it back to their border, and erect a
::: fence - but besides regular pruning does anyone have any tips on
::: how to stop it growing back over?
:::
::
::
:: What are you hoping to achieve with your garden, a wasteland?
:: Plants are natural things that do not live by the same rules as
:: us. If they fancy growing over a fence, then thats just what they
:: will do. Regardless of whose fence it is and which side of the
:: fence they are supposed to stay on.
::
:: I like it when neighbours plant climbing plants on the shady side
:: of their garden. The climber races up to the sunlight and spills
:: over the fence normally giving a nice display of flowers and
:: growth, without the need for maintenance.

It's strange you should mention this...I have three or four clematis growing
in pots on a shady fence, all we see is a few miserable stalks and weeds
growing in the pots, next door meanwhile has a mass of flowers and
foilage...it was only this afternoon that I thought about cutting it all
back and repotting it for next year and moving it to a sunnier position in
my own garden....when's the best time to do this anyone?




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Old 02-09-2004, 08:37 PM
Nick Maclaren
 
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In article ,
Phil L wrote:

It's strange you should mention this...I have three or four clematis growing
in pots on a shady fence, all we see is a few miserable stalks and weeds
growing in the pots, next door meanwhile has a mass of flowers and
foilage...it was only this afternoon that I thought about cutting it all
back and repotting it for next year and moving it to a sunnier position in
my own garden....when's the best time to do this anyone?


If they flower early in the year, immediately after flowering. If
they flower later, any time from late autumn to late winter. If
they include C. armandii, that may well die.


Regards,
Nick Maclaren.
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Old 02-09-2004, 08:47 PM
Phil L
 
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Default

Nick Maclaren wrote:
:: In article ,
:: Phil L wrote:
:::
::: It's strange you should mention this...I have three or four
::: clematis growing in pots on a shady fence, all we see is a few
::: miserable stalks and weeds growing in the pots, next door
::: meanwhile has a mass of flowers and foilage...it was only this
::: afternoon that I thought about cutting it all back and repotting
::: it for next year and moving it to a sunnier position in my own
::: garden....when's the best time to do this anyone?
::
:: If they flower early in the year, immediately after flowering. If
:: they flower later, any time from late autumn to late winter. If
:: they include C. armandii, that may well die.
::
There are still some flowers on it now, though not as many as there has
been, I'll leave it a few more weeks and cut it right back...I've no idea if
it's an armandii, but it's in the way where it is...we have bindweed and a
few brambles taking root very close - I cannot get to them to treat them or
get the roots out with the tangle of clematis in the way.


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Old 02-09-2004, 09:30 PM
Nick Maclaren
 
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Default

In article ,
Phil L wrote:
::
There are still some flowers on it now, though not as many as there has
been, I'll leave it a few more weeks and cut it right back...I've no idea if
it's an armandii, but it's in the way where it is...we have bindweed and a
few brambles taking root very close - I cannot get to them to treat them or
get the roots out with the tangle of clematis in the way.


C. armandii is the hardy evergreen clematis, with leathery green
leaves c. 8" long (somewhat laurel-like). No other clematis that
grows in the UK is anything like it.


Regards,
Nick Maclaren.
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Old 02-09-2004, 09:39 PM
Mike
 
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Default


It's strange you should mention this...I have three or four clematis

growing
in pots on a shady fence, all we see is a few miserable stalks and weeds
growing in the pots, next door meanwhile has a mass of flowers and
foilage...it was only this afternoon that I thought about cutting it all
back and repotting it for next year and moving it to a sunnier position in
my own garden....when's the best time to do this anyone?


We have a beautiful Lilac tree. Next door always have the good display :-))

Mike


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Old 02-09-2004, 09:47 PM
Phil L
 
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Default

Nick Maclaren wrote:
:: In article ,
:: Phil L wrote:
:::::
::: There are still some flowers on it now, though not as many as
::: there has been, I'll leave it a few more weeks and cut it right
::: back...I've no idea if it's an armandii, but it's in the way
::: where it is...we have bindweed and a few brambles taking root
::: very close - I cannot get to them to treat them or get the roots
::: out with the tangle of clematis in the way.
::
:: C. armandii is the hardy evergreen clematis, with leathery green
:: leaves c. 8" long (somewhat laurel-like). No other clematis that
:: grows in the UK is anything like it.
::
::
It's not an armandii then, I've no idea what type it is, I rarely see any
flowers unless I look through an upstairs window and peer over next doors.




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Old 02-09-2004, 10:29 PM
Stephen Howard
 
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On Thu, 2 Sep 2004 19:42:45 +0100, "Ian Waddell"
wrote:

Hmmm, bit too swift with the send button!

Basically I've cut down some very dense growth of honeysuckle that I
*thought* was growing from our garden. Whilst I was doing this the
neighbour behind us informed me that it has grown from the neighbour to our
side.

Now, I'm planning to cut it back to their border, and erect a fence - but
besides regular pruning does anyone have any tips on how to stop it growing
back over?

Not a hope, I'd say.

About three years ago I had to clear a path through the woods adjacent
to my garden. The spot that needed clearing was a dense thicket made
up almost entirely of honeysuckle ( the scent midsummer is incredible!
).
Three years later and it looks as though I'd never set foot there.

I love the stuff personally, but find that some specimens fall prey to
mildew - so I hack them right back round about now, safe in the
knowledge that they'll be back as good as ever next year.
If you want to be free of it you'll have to completely kill or remove
it...or just out up with cutting any invading shoots off on a regular
basis.

There's a caveat to this last method though. Regular pruning of
honeysuckle encourages thick stems below the cut - which then put out
even more shoots!

I think your best bet would be to talk to your neighbour - and if
necessary offer to replace the honeysuckle with something a bit less
vigorous.

Regards,



--
Stephen Howard - Woodwind repairs & period restorations
http://www.shwoodwind.co.uk
Emails to: showard{who is at}shwoodwind{dot}co{dot}uk
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Old 03-09-2004, 06:28 AM
Franz Heymann
 
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Default


"Ian Waddell" wrote in message
...
Hmmm, bit too swift with the send button!

Basically I've cut down some very dense growth of honeysuckle that I
*thought* was growing from our garden. Whilst I was doing this the
neighbour behind us informed me that it has grown from the neighbour

to our
side.

Now, I'm planning to cut it back to their border, and erect a

fence - but
besides regular pruning does anyone have any tips on how to stop it

growing
back over?


Why should you want to get rid of it? Honeysuckle is a delightful
plant.
Just reduce it to an acceptable size and enjoy it.

Franz


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Old 03-09-2004, 08:45 AM
Franz Heymann
 
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Default


"Phil L" wrote in message
...
Nick Maclaren wrote:
:: In article ,
:: Phil L wrote:
:::::
::: There are still some flowers on it now, though not as many as
::: there has been, I'll leave it a few more weeks and cut it right
::: back...I've no idea if it's an armandii, but it's in the way
::: where it is...we have bindweed and a few brambles taking root
::: very close - I cannot get to them to treat them or get the roots
::: out with the tangle of clematis in the way.
::
:: C. armandii is the hardy evergreen clematis, with leathery green
:: leaves c. 8" long (somewhat laurel-like). No other clematis that
:: grows in the UK is anything like it.
::
::
It's not an armandii then, I've no idea what type it is, I rarely

see any
flowers unless I look through an upstairs window and peer over next

doors.

There are a large number of common, late flowering clematis which are
supposed to be cut right down to 2 or 3 buds from the ground in the
off-season. If your clematis is one of those, you will have no
problem at all moving them a little later in the year. I would be
inclined to give it a bash.

Franz



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Old 03-09-2004, 09:59 AM
Nick Maclaren
 
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Default


In article ,
"Franz Heymann" writes:
|
| There are a large number of common, late flowering clematis which are
| supposed to be cut right down to 2 or 3 buds from the ground in the
| off-season. If your clematis is one of those, you will have no
| problem at all moving them a little later in the year. I would be
| inclined to give it a bash.

Are there ANY hardy clematis that flower in summer or later that
CAN'T be treated that way?


Regards,
Nick Maclaren.
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Old 03-09-2004, 02:24 PM
D Russell
 
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Default

"Phil L" wrote in message
...
Aardvark wrote:
:: On Thu, 2 Sep 2004 19:42:45 +0100, "Ian Waddell"
:: wrote:
::
It's strange you should mention this...I have three or four clematis

growing
in pots on a shady fence, all we see is a few miserable stalks and weeds
growing in the pots, next door meanwhile has a mass of flowers and
foilage...it was only this afternoon that I thought about cutting it all
back and repotting it for next year and moving it to a sunnier position in
my own garden....when's the best time to do this anyone?

One of our neighbours put up a conservatory then asked me what I did with
the lovely yellow spring flowering plant that used to grow between our
houses. I pointed out that a) We'd never seen it flower because they had the
sunny side of the fence, and b) They'd built a conservatory on the border.

Ho hum, can't all be gardeners I guess
D




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