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Old 19-11-2002, 03:46 PM
dave @ stejonda
 
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Default what's the name of the shrub that has marble sized.shaped white fruit?

My father grew a shrub ~4ft in height, deciduous, open structure which
produced perfectly round white marble-sized fruit which I remember as
having a sweetish smell when squashed. Does anyone have any idea what
this might be please. I've long wanted to grow one but have never seen
it in a GC.

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dave @ stejonda

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Old 19-11-2002, 03:57 PM
Michael Savage
 
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Default what's the name of the shrub that has marble sized.shaped white fruit?

"dave @ stejonda" wrote in message
...
My father grew a shrub ~4ft in height, deciduous, open structure which
produced perfectly round white marble-sized fruit which I remember as
having a sweetish smell when squashed. Does anyone have any idea what
this might be please. I've long wanted to grow one but have never seen
it in a GC.

--
dave @ stejonda

calculate your ecological footprint

http://www.lead.org/leadnet/footprint/

Sounds like Snowberry to me.

Michael S


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Old 19-11-2002, 05:34 PM
dave @ stejonda
 
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Default what's the name of the shrub that has marble sized.shaped white fruit?

In message , Michael Savage
writes
"dave @ stejonda" wrote in message
...
My father grew a shrub ~4ft in height, deciduous, open structure which
produced perfectly round white marble-sized fruit which I remember as
having a sweetish smell when squashed. Does anyone have any idea what
this might be please. I've long wanted to grow one but have never seen
it in a GC.


Sounds like Snowberry to me.

Thanks muchly - does anyone know its Latin name?

--
dave @ stejonda

calculate your ecological footprint http://www.lead.org/leadnet/footprint/
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Old 19-11-2002, 05:47 PM
Alan and Liz
 
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Default what's the name of the shrub that has marble sized.shaped white fruit?

Hi there
I think this is Symphoricarpos albus.( Commonly known as the 'Snowberry').
It's a deciduous shrub with white berries like marbles,as you say, from
mid-autumn to mid-winter. It's also meant to have pink flowers from
mid-summer to early autumn. Expected height and spread:-6ft by 6ft.In one of
my gardening books, it's listed under plants that prefer shade. I remember
it as a kid as we used to squash the berries.
Hope this helps.
Liz


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Old 19-11-2002, 07:46 PM
dave @ stejonda
 
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Default what's the name of the shrub that has marble sized.shaped white fruit?

In message , Alan and Liz
writes
Hi there
I think this is Symphoricarpos albus.( Commonly known as the
'Snowberry'). It's a deciduous shrub with white berries like marbles,as
you say, from mid-autumn to mid-winter. It's also meant to have pink
flowers from mid-summer to early autumn. Expected height and
spread:-6ft by 6ft.In one of my gardening books, it's listed under
plants that prefer shade. I remember
it as a kid as we used to squash the berries.


thanks Liz, yep, that's what we used to do, hence I remember the smell.

--
dave @ stejonda

calculate your ecological footprint http://www.lead.org/leadnet/footprint/


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Old 20-11-2002, 03:14 AM
Rodger Whitlock
 
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Default what's the name of the shrub that has marble sized.shaped white fruit?

On Tue, 19 Nov 2002 17:34:14 +0000, "dave @ stejonda"
wrote:

Sounds like Snowberry to me.

Thanks muchly - does anyone know its Latin name?


Symphoricarpos albus.

The subspecies S. a. laevigatus is native hereabouts. It likes a
somewhat shady, seasonally wet/moist position, but can handle
nearly complete drought during the summer.


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Rodger Whitlock
Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
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Old 21-11-2002, 06:09 AM
dave @ stejonda
 
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Default what's the name of the shrub that has marble sized.shaped white fruit?

In message , Rodger Whitlock
writes
On Tue, 19 Nov 2002 17:34:14 +0000, "dave @ stejonda"
wrote:

Sounds like Snowberry to me.


Symphoricarpos albus.

The subspecies S. a. laevigatus is native hereabouts.


I'll try and plant it near my Canadian white cedar arch then, provide
some kind of coherence, at least in my mind.

It likes a
somewhat shady, seasonally wet/moist position, but can handle
nearly complete drought during the summer.

I've received an email follow-up, from someone saying that they've heard
it is poisonous. Does anyone know whether this is true? Is it seriously
poisonous to humans? which parts? The arch mentioned above is near my
pond, would the leaves/berries be poisonous to fish?

The same correspondent also suggested that it has a wide-spreading and
deep root system which even concrete may have difficulty containing.
This might explain why it's not widely grown in the UK. Might I have
problems with containment?

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dave @ stejonda

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Old 22-11-2002, 05:30 PM
Victoria Clare
 
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Default what's the name of the shrub that has marble sized.shaped white fruit?

"dave @ stejonda" wrote in
:

In message , Victoria
Clare writes
Maybe it's less popular in the East of the country?


Would you just know it... I've just been out to the shops and because of
an incident I was forced to park the car in a road I've never stopped in
before. And there in the garden of the house I parked outside of was a
Snowberry thicket!!!


Well, I hope you popped in to beg a cutting!
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Old 22-11-2002, 06:02 PM
dave @ stejonda
 
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Default what's the name of the shrub that has marble sized.shaped white fruit?

In message , Victoria
Clare writes
And there in the garden of the house I parked outside of was a
Snowberry thicket!!!


Well, I hope you popped in to beg a cutting!


London commuter land - no reply to knock at door. Will go back, maybe
this weekend, and ask if I can dig up a piece with roots - there was
masses of it.

--
dave @ stejonda
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Old 22-11-2002, 06:11 PM
Hussein M.
 
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Default what's the name of the shrub that has marble sized.shaped white fruit?

On Thu, 21 Nov 2002 21:27:45 GMT,
(Rodger Whitlock) wrote:


I'd say, don't worry. It may not be an edible plant, but it
doesn't have any particular reputation for being toxic. Emails
claiming otherwise I consider to be mere propagation of urban
horticultural legendry.


NB this is for Symphoricarpos albus laevigatus

PFAF toxicity:
The fruit contains saponins. Although toxic, these substances are very
poorly absorbed by the body and so tend to pass through without
causing harm. They are also broken down by thorough cooking. Saponins
are found in many plants, including several that are often used for
food, such as certain beans. It is advisable not to eat large
quantities of food that contain saponins but it would take extremely
large doses of many kilos of fruit from this plant in order to produce
toxic symptoms[65]. Saponins are much more toxic to some creatures,
such as fish, and hunting tribes have traditionally put large
quantities of them in streams, lakes etc in order to stupefy or kill
the fish[K].

PFAF Edible uses!
Fruit - raw or cooked[2, 105, 161]. An insipid flavour, it is best if
cooked[177]. The fruit is rather boring[K]. The fruit is about 15mm in
diameter[200]. See the notes at top of page regarding possible
toxicity.

PFAF Medicinal
Snowberry was commonly employed medicinally by several native North
American Indian tribes who valued it especially for the saponins it
contains. These saponins can be toxic, but when applied externally
they have a gentle cleansing and healing effect upon the skin, killing
body parasites and helping in the healing of wounds. The native
Americans used it to treat a variety of complaints but especially as
an external wash on the skin[257]. The plant is little, if at all,
used in modern herbalism. Any internal use of this plant should be
carried out with care, and preferably under the supervision of a
qualified practitioner. See the notes above on toxicity.
The whole plant is disinfectant, diuretic, febrifuge and
laxative[257].
An infusion of the stems has been drunk to treat stomach problems and
menstrual disorders[213].
A decoction of the leaves has been used in the treatment of
colds[257]. A poultice of the chewed leaves has been applied, or an
infusion of the leaves has been used as a wash, in the treatment of
external injuries[257].
A weak solution of the stems and leaves has been used as a wash for
children whilst a stronger solution is applied to sores[213].
The fruit has been eaten, or used as an infusion, in the treatment of
diarrhoea[257]. An infusion of the fruit has been used as an eye wash
for sore eyes[257].The berries have been rubbed on the skin as a
treatment for burns, rashes, itches and sores[257]. The berries have
also been rubbed on warts in order to get rid of them - this treatment
needs to be carried out at least three times a day for a period of a
few weeks[257].
A poultice of the crushed leaves, fruit and bark has been used in the
treatment of burns, sores, cuts, chapped and injured skin[257].
An infusion of the roots has been used in the treatment of fevers
(including childhood fevers), stomach aches and colds[257]. A
decoction of the root bark has been used in the treatment of venereal
disease and to restore the flow of urine[257]. An infusion of the root
has been used as an eyewash for sore eyes[257].
An infusion of the whole plant has been drunk and also applied
externally in the treatment of skin rashes[257].
A decoction of the roots and stems has been used in the treatment of
the inability to urinate, venereal disease, tuberculosis and the
fevers associated with teething sickness[257].

I don't know if the above applies to all members of the genus but
similar comments are made concerning occidentalis and orbiculatus.

Respect

Hussein




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