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Old 27-01-2005, 10:03 AM
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Default tea bags

my grandfather (he's 96) tells me to keep all used teabags empty them and through them in the garden is this good food for the plants/vegetables, soil or just an old wives tale

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Old 27-01-2005, 02:22 PM
Nick Maclaren
 
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In article ,
gramgill writes:
|
| my grandfather (he's 96) tells me to keep all used teabags empty them
| and through them in the garden is this good food for the
| plants/vegetables, soil or just an old wives tale

Nah. Just throw them on the compost heap (or garden, if you like);
don't bother about emptying them.

Yes, he's right - and they are particularly appropriate (even
uncomposted) for plants like camellias that like a bed of leaf
mould (which is roughly what used tea leaves are).


Regards,
Nick Maclaren.
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Old 27-01-2005, 03:29 PM
June Hughes
 
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In message , gramgill
writes

my grandfather (he's 96) tells me to keep all used teabags empty them
and through them in the garden is this good food for the
plants/vegetables, soil or just an old wives tale



I use them on mine.
--
June Hughes
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Old 27-01-2005, 07:05 PM
andrewpreece
 
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"June Hughes" wrote in message
...
In message , gramgill
writes

my grandfather (he's 96) tells me to keep all used teabags empty them
and through them in the garden is this good food for the
plants/vegetables, soil or just an old wives tale



My mum does this - she says they don't rot down very fast if they're put
complete into the compost heap.

Andy.


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Old 27-01-2005, 09:55 PM
Franz Heymann
 
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"Nick Maclaren" wrote in message
...

In article ,
gramgill writes:
|
| my grandfather (he's 96) tells me to keep all used teabags empty

them
| and through them in the garden is this good food for the
| plants/vegetables, soil or just an old wives tale

Nah. Just throw them on the compost heap (or garden, if you like);
don't bother about emptying them.

Yes, he's right - and they are particularly appropriate (even
uncomposted) for plants like camellias that like a bed of leaf
mould (which is roughly what used tea leaves are).


You'll have to be either very young or a very avid tea drinker to
provide a reasonable bed of mould for a camellia
{:-))

Franz




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Old 27-01-2005, 10:02 PM
Mike Lyle
 
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andrewpreece wrote:
"June Hughes" wrote in message
...
In message , gramgill
writes

my grandfather (he's 96) tells me to keep all used teabags empty
them and through them in the garden is this good food for the
plants/vegetables, soil or just an old wives tale



My mum does this - she says they don't rot down very fast if

they're
put complete into the compost heap.


But tea leaves are high in nitrogen, so they're a good thing. You can
rip each bag in half as you chuck it in the compost bucket to spread
them out, of course, and the fibres in the bag itself will break down
sooner or later.

Mike.


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Old 28-01-2005, 10:36 AM
Nick Maclaren
 
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In article ,
"Oxymel of Squill" writes:
| very dangerous advice if the word of Brussels is to be believed. The EU
| recently declared the teabag (a construction od leaves and paper) to be an
| 'animal product' and banned Cardiff Council from adding them to its
| composting process
| http://www.independence.org.uk/abc_n...hp?t=1&id=1169

Not at all. That is nonsense perpetrated by the Little Englanders,
whose only skill appears to be in persuading the (admittedly stupid)
UK population to believe their lies.

If you take a further look, and bother to find out about the reasons
for the rule (which isn't what is said), you will find that it is
rooted in an attempt to get particularly unscientific and deliberately
negligent counties (like the UK) to avoid creating another epidemic
like the foot and mouth one. The rule might be ridiculous, but the
fact that such rules are needed because we can't trust our own
government to look after our own interests is worse.


Regards,
Nick Maclaren.
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Old 28-01-2005, 11:22 AM
Mike Lyle
 
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Oxymel of Squill wrote:
very dangerous advice if the word of Brussels is to be believed.

The
EU recently declared the teabag (a construction od leaves and

paper)
to be an 'animal product' and banned Cardiff Council from adding

them
to its composting process
http://www.independence.org.uk/abc_n...hp?t=1&id=1169

[...]

Well, crazy as it sounds, this is no "straight banana" story. It's
the milk residues in _used_ teabags which are suspect; and this is
part of the battery of precautions against foot-and-mouth disease.
Overkill, I'm sure, especially as it's hard to get proper
unpasteurised milk these days, and unenforceable; but if you're going
to ban animal products from municipal compost I suppose you just have
to ban them all.

Vaccinate the cattle, I say. Or even treat the disease when it comes
up, and let our cattle develop a degree of immunity. But we don't do
sensible round here.

Mike.


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Old 28-01-2005, 11:24 AM
jane
 
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On 28 Jan 2005 10:36:16 GMT, (Nick Maclaren) wrote:

~
~In article ,
~"Oxymel of Squill" writes:
~| very dangerous advice if the word of Brussels is to be believed. The EU
~| recently declared the teabag (a construction od leaves and paper) to be an
~| 'animal product' and banned Cardiff Council from adding them to its
~| composting process
~|
http://www.independence.org.uk/abc_n...hp?t=1&id=1169
~
~Not at all. That is nonsense perpetrated by the Little Englanders,
~whose only skill appears to be in persuading the (admittedly stupid)
~UK population to believe their lies.

The actual problem is that some people make tea by putting milk and a
teabag in a cup or mug then adding hot water, so the milk (definitely
an animal product!) may well be on the teabags.

Personally I shiver at the thought of putting water onto cold milk and
teabag, as the resulting tea tastes awful! One of my work colleagues
makes it like that, and I didn't realise for some time why her
offerings tasted weird compared with everyone else's, until one day I
was watching...

Now we'll no doubt have a discussion on the benefits of whether it's
tea first or milk first :-)))

~If you take a further look, and bother to find out about the reasons
~for the rule (which isn't what is said), you will find that it is
~rooted in an attempt to get particularly unscientific and deliberately
~negligent counties (like the UK) to avoid creating another epidemic
~like the foot and mouth one. The rule might be ridiculous, but the
~fact that such rules are needed because we can't trust our own
~government to look after our own interests is worse.
~
or folk don't know how to make tea????
;-) ;-) ;-)

I compost all my teabags (definitely no milk added), fwiw. For a while
I also composted work's, which was a very large number but the storage
buckets kept going mouldy between my weekly collections and some folk
just fished out their bags sopping wet and shoved them in without
squeezing so it was often awash... urgh.

Ah the perils of trying to be green...


--
jane

Don't part with your illusions. When they are gone,
you may still exist but you have ceased to live.
Mark Twain

Please remove onmaps from replies, thanks!
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Old 28-01-2005, 09:59 PM
Doubledigger
 
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On my garden empty tea bags rotted down much, much later rather than sooner.
Fed up with seeing them scattered around the borders, I now throw them in
the
wheelie bin.

D.D.
---
"Mike Lyle" wrote in a message:
You can rip each bag in half as you chuck it in the compost bucket to
spread them out, of course, and the fibres in the bag itself will break

down
sooner or later.









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Old 29-01-2005, 12:25 PM
Nick Maclaren
 
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In article ,
Doubledigger wrote:
On my garden empty tea bags rotted down much, much later rather than sooner.
Fed up with seeing them scattered around the borders, I now throw them in
the wheelie bin.


How very unadventurous. Why not:

Use them as ammunition for a CATapult?
Build a raised bed for peat-loving plants?
Use them as sandbags when the icecaps melt and England floods?
Dry them and burn them for an Irish turf fire experience?
I am sure that people can think of other gardening ideas ....


Regards,
Nick Maclaren.
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Old 29-01-2005, 04:39 PM
JennyC
 
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"Nick Maclaren" wrote in message
...
In article ,
Doubledigger wrote:
On my garden empty tea bags rotted down much, much later rather than sooner.
Fed up with seeing them scattered around the borders, I now throw them in
the wheelie bin.


How very unadventurous. Why not:

Use them as ammunition for a CATapult?
Build a raised bed for peat-loving plants?
Use them as sandbags when the icecaps melt and England floods?
Dry them and burn them for an Irish turf fire experience?
I am sure that people can think of other gardening ideas ....
Regards,
Nick Maclaren.


Use to cover the hole in the bottom of flowerpots...........
String up for the birds - British birds would probably love a dried cuppa, or
they could use them as nest material......
Jenny



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Old 30-01-2005, 09:33 AM
Registered User
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Dec 2004
Posts: 95
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gramgill
my grandfather (he's 96) tells me to keep all used teabags
old coffee grounds are said to deter slugs/snails if spread on the soil surface...can any one confirm ?
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Old 30-01-2005, 10:48 AM
anton
 
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"Nick Maclaren" wrote in message
...

In article ,
"Oxymel of Squill" writes:
| very dangerous advice if the word of Brussels is to be believed. The EU
| recently declared the teabag (a construction od leaves and paper) to be

an
| 'animal product' and banned Cardiff Council from adding them to its
| composting process
| http://www.independence.org.uk/abc_n...hp?t=1&id=1169

Not at all. That is nonsense perpetrated by the Little Englanders,
whose only skill appears to be in persuading the (admittedly stupid)
UK population to believe their lies.


What precisely are you asserting is the lie? That teabags contaminated by
milk are classified as an animal product, and cannot be low-temperature
composted?


If you take a further look, and bother to find out about the reasons
for the rule (which isn't what is said), you will find that it is
rooted in an attempt to get particularly unscientific and deliberately
negligent counties (like the UK) to avoid creating another epidemic
like the foot and mouth one.


More exactly, it would be countries with particularly unscientific and
deliberately negligent governments (like the current UK one).

The rule might be ridiculous, but the
fact that such rules are needed because we can't trust our own
government to look after our own interests is worse.


-and the smokescreen laid down by europhiliacs attempting to deny that
kitchen refuse was banned from being composted would feature where in your
weltanschauung?

--
Anton


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Old 30-01-2005, 11:07 AM
Janet Tweedy
 
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In article , Nick Maclaren
writes

How very unadventurous. Why not:

Use them as ammunition for a CATapult?
Build a raised bed for peat-loving plants?
Use them as sandbags when the icecaps melt and England floods?
Dry them and burn them for an Irish turf fire experience?
I am sure that people can think of other gardening ideas ....



Stand by for a very long and interesting list from Janet Barraclough,
she's one of the most adventurous and inventive 'recyclers' I know

Janet
--
Janet Tweedy
Dalmatian Telegraph
http://www.lancedal.demon.co.uk


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