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Old 27-01-2005, 07:59 PM
Paul Giverin
 
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Default "Cottage garden" bed suggestions

I'm just about to reorganise one of my beds and I plan to plant it in a
cottage garden style.

Definite inclusions so far a- Delphiniums, Aquilegia (various),
Geranium, Echinacea, Euphorbia and possibly Lavender.

Any other "must haves" that I should consider? The bed is south and west
facing and gets full sun from 11am onwards. The soil is light, well
drained, and fairly sheltered.

Cheers,

--
Paul Giverin

British Jet Engine Website http://www.britjet.co.uk

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Old 27-01-2005, 08:48 PM
keith ;-\)
 
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With a cottage garden there really is no plan,they are a riot of colour with
plants crammed in were ever they fit.Let them selfseed to make it look more
natural.You could also grow hollyhocks,poppies,helenium,lupins,foxgloves &
entwine honeysuckle through hedging if you have one.What about rustic
wigwams with clematis or climbing scented roses.Herbs were they can be
touched or brushed past so you catch the scent.
Your getting me going now!
Have fun creating it.

--
Thanks Keith,England,UK.
"Paul Giverin" wrote in message
...
I'm just about to reorganise one of my beds and I plan to plant it in a
cottage garden style.

Definite inclusions so far a- Delphiniums, Aquilegia (various),
Geranium, Echinacea, Euphorbia and possibly Lavender.

Any other "must haves" that I should consider? The bed is south and west
facing and gets full sun from 11am onwards. The soil is light, well
drained, and fairly sheltered.

Cheers,

--
Paul Giverin

British Jet Engine Website http://www.britjet.co.uk



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Old 27-01-2005, 10:10 PM
Mike Lyle
 
Posts: n/a
Default

keith ;-) wrote:
[...]
Paul wrote:

I'm just about to reorganise one of my beds and I plan to plant it
in a cottage garden style.

Definite inclusions so far a- Delphiniums, Aquilegia (various),
Geranium, Echinacea, Euphorbia and possibly Lavender.

Any other "must haves" that I should consider? [...]


What about rustic wigwams with
clematis or climbing scented roses.[...]


Got to have sweet peas!

Mike.


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Old 28-01-2005, 01:01 PM
Spider
 
Posts: n/a
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Paul Giverin wrote in message
...
I'm just about to reorganise one of my beds and I plan to plant it in a
cottage garden style.

Definite inclusions so far a- Delphiniums, Aquilegia (various),
Geranium, Echinacea, Euphorbia and possibly Lavender.

Any other "must haves" that I should consider? The bed is south and west
facing and gets full sun from 11am onwards. The soil is light, well
drained, and fairly sheltered.

Cheers,

--
Paul Giverin

British Jet Engine Website http://www.britjet.co.uk


Hi Paul,

Yes, you must have masses of single daisy flowers: 'Shasta' daisies,
coreopsis, asters, heleniums, rudbeckias, erigeron - keep mostly to
single-flowering forms, for 'cottage-garden' credibility and especially to
attact bees and hoverflies. (Most double-flowered plants are sterile and
offer nothing for wildlife; they are showier, though, and the flowers last
longer because they can't be pollinated, so don't 'go over' as quickly. For
that reason, just grow a few favourites.)

Lavender isn't a "possible" - it's a definite, especially since you have the
right conditions. Also try and make room for Rosemary.

Also consider: Liatris, Lupins, Crambe cordifolia, Verbena bonariensis,
linaria, gaura, thalictrum, penstemmon, pinks (dianthus), hardy fuchsias,
veronicas and veronicastrum, lilies and alliums.
For a froth of mid-border two-tone roses, try Rosa 'Ballerina' and/or
'Marjorie Fair' - no scent, but a great filler.

Definitely consider pots for the porch/front of the house and for 'dotting'
around when colour is sparse: lilies and pelargoniums are good for this, as
are tender bedding fuchsias. I love the sunny cascade of Bidens, but this
is too bright for some people! For a pretty cascade of blue (or sunny
ground cover), try both Convolvulus sabatius (previously C. Mauritius) and
Veronica prostrata.

Spider






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Old 28-01-2005, 10:32 PM
Paul Giverin
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In message , Spider
writes
Hi Paul,

Yes, you must have masses of single daisy flowers: 'Shasta' daisies,
coreopsis, asters, heleniums, rudbeckias, erigeron - keep mostly to
single-flowering forms, for 'cottage-garden' credibility and especially to
attact bees and hoverflies. (Most double-flowered plants are sterile and
offer nothing for wildlife; they are showier, though, and the flowers last
longer because they can't be pollinated, so don't 'go over' as quickly. For
that reason, just grow a few favourites.)

Lavender isn't a "possible" - it's a definite, especially since you have the
right conditions. Also try and make room for Rosemary.

Also consider: Liatris, Lupins, Crambe cordifolia, Verbena bonariensis,
linaria, gaura, thalictrum, penstemmon, pinks (dianthus), hardy fuchsias,
veronicas and veronicastrum, lilies and alliums.
For a froth of mid-border two-tone roses, try Rosa 'Ballerina' and/or
'Marjorie Fair' - no scent, but a great filler.

Definitely consider pots for the porch/front of the house and for 'dotting'
around when colour is sparse: lilies and pelargoniums are good for this, as
are tender bedding fuchsias. I love the sunny cascade of Bidens, but this
is too bright for some people! For a pretty cascade of blue (or sunny
ground cover), try both Convolvulus sabatius (previously C. Mauritius) and
Veronica prostrata.

Thanks for that. Its certainly given me plenty to think about.

Lupins will probably be there because the wife likes them a lot. There
are already penstemmon and pinks in there so they will stay. There used
to be lilies in there (pink perfection...very fragrant) but the mice got
the bulbs and I now grow all my lilies in pots.

I do like asters but the conditions aren't really right. In the past
they suffered terribly from powdery mildew. I've grown coreopsis from
seed and also bought from the garden centre but their reputation for
being short lived seems justified and I never seem to get more than two
seasons out of them.

Thanks to everyone who replied.

--
Paul Giverin

British Jet Engine Website http://www.britjet.co.uk
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Old 30-01-2005, 11:00 PM
ex WGS Hamm
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Paul Giverin" wrote in message
...
I'm just about to reorganise one of my beds and I plan to plant it in a
cottage garden style.

Definite inclusions so far a- Delphiniums, Aquilegia (various),
Geranium, Echinacea, Euphorbia and possibly Lavender.

Any other "must haves" that I should consider? The bed is south and west
facing and gets full sun from 11am onwards. The soil is light, well
drained, and fairly sheltered.

Sweet william, nasturtium, pinks, sweet peas,canterbury bells,
larkspur,lady's mantle,anemones,monkshood,calendula.


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Old 01-02-2005, 11:07 AM
G1nger
 
Posts: n/a
Default

ex WGS Hamm wrote:
"Paul Giverin" wrote in message
...

I'm just about to reorganise one of my beds and I plan to plant it in a
cottage garden style.

Any other "must haves" that I should consider? The bed is south and west
facing and gets full sun from 11am onwards. The soil is light, well
drained, and fairly sheltered.


honesty, teasels, verbascum, poppies, solidago, lychnis (I love the red
lychnis), pulsatilla, salvia, echinacea,
monarda, lavatera....these are my suggestions...and why not add the
ultra-fashionable cardoon? terribly "in" at the moment, but fantastic
nonetheless.

So long as it's crammed full to bursting...

G1nger

http://www.gardenopoly.co.uk



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Old 01-02-2005, 12:32 PM
Paul Giverin
 
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Default

In message , G1nger
writes
ex WGS Hamm wrote:
"Paul Giverin" wrote in message
...

I'm just about to reorganise one of my beds and I plan to plant it in

cottage garden style.

Any other "must haves" that I should consider? The bed is south and west
facing and gets full sun from 11am onwards. The soil is light, well
drained, and fairly sheltered.


honesty, teasels, verbascum, poppies, solidago, lychnis (I love the red
lychnis), pulsatilla, salvia, echinacea,
monarda, lavatera....these are my suggestions...and why not add the
ultra-fashionable cardoon? terribly "in" at the moment, but fantastic
nonetheless.

So long as it's crammed full to bursting...

Thanks for the ideas. I've had a few Verbascum before but they are very
short lived for me. I've also had Solidago but they are a bit too
invasive for my liking. Monardas are nice but when I've had them planted
in the past, they have suffered badly from mildew, probably because my
soil is quite dry. I'll certainly be putting Salvias in as I do like
them. I'd forgotten about Lavatera. Where you referring to the annual or
perennial variety? I've grown the annuals from seed in the past and they
were nice

--
Paul Giverin

British Jet Engine Website http://www.britjet.co.uk
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Old 02-02-2005, 09:35 PM
keith ;-\)
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Monardas do suffer abit from mildew ,but I wouldn't let this stop you from
using them.They stand out,are fragrant , the flowers are unusual & have
medicinal uses.The foliage will probably be hidden by other plants anyway.
Can you tell I really like monardas!
Thanks Keith,England,UK.
"Paul Giverin" wrote in message
...
In message , G1nger
writes
ex WGS Hamm wrote:
"Paul Giverin" wrote in message
...

I'm just about to reorganise one of my beds and I plan to plant it in

cottage garden style.

Any other "must haves" that I should consider? The bed is south and

west
facing and gets full sun from 11am onwards. The soil is light, well
drained, and fairly sheltered.

honesty, teasels, verbascum, poppies, solidago, lychnis (I love the red
lychnis), pulsatilla, salvia, echinacea,
monarda, lavatera....these are my suggestions...and why not add the
ultra-fashionable cardoon? terribly "in" at the moment, but fantastic
nonetheless.

So long as it's crammed full to bursting...

Thanks for the ideas. I've had a few Verbascum before but they are very
short lived for me. I've also had Solidago but they are a bit too
invasive for my liking. Monardas are nice but when I've had them planted
in the past, they have suffered badly from mildew, probably because my
soil is quite dry. I'll certainly be putting Salvias in as I do like
them. I'd forgotten about Lavatera. Where you referring to the annual or
perennial variety? I've grown the annuals from seed in the past and they
were nice

--
Paul Giverin

British Jet Engine Website http://www.britjet.co.uk





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