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Old 07-02-2005, 11:35 PM
Franz Heymann
 
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"Janet Baraclough" wrote in message
...
The message
from "suspicious minds" contains these

words:



Firstly, the worms were sold to me by a firm which specialises

in worm
composting accessories.

In which case they will not be 'earthworms'.

Secondly, that url to which Kay used to draw our attention was

written
by someone whose professional research is concerned with a

study of
worms.
Do I believe him ot you?

As I studied the ecology of Earthworms extensively at

university, I would
suggest a third possibility: you have incorrectly remembered

what you read
on this site. If you would care to provide a direct link to your

evidence,
I will, of course, apologise. Similarly, if it turns out that

you are
mistaken, perhaps you could do the decent thing?


I have read the site that Franz is on about and indeed it does say

that the
worms for composting can be obtained from your garden. What I

think
confuses
Franz is the different types of worms that can be found in the

garden. The
site mentions that tiger worms etc are just fancy names for what

are
commonly known as brandlings (Eisenia foetida) and redworms and

can easily
be collected from compost heaps and under stones etc. It does not

say that
earthworms( Lumbricus terrestis) which found on lawns etc and are

commonly
known as lobworms are suitable for wormeries.I do not have the URL


it's Edward's earthworm page:
http://www.scarboro.demon.co.uk/garden/




I posted a similar comment a couple of days ago, same conclusion

as
Suspicious. Franz misinterpreted what it said


I did not misinterpret anything I read in that URL. I am not familiar
with the name Lumbricus terrestis, so I would not have used it. There
are other earthworms.

Franz



  #77   Report Post  
Old 08-02-2005, 11:17 PM
Kay
 
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In article , Franz Heymann
writes

"Janet Baraclough" wrote in message
...
The message
from "Franz Heymann" contains

these words:

I do not have any failed worms on my farm. They are thrivind and
rotund.


Rotund doesn't sound much like brandling worms. You're not using
earthworms, by any chance?


I bought them at great expense from a firm which sold them as worms
for composting.
Hoever, Kay used to have a url to a site on worm composting. I think
it was produced by her better half. (The site, that is, not the
compost. {:-))
There, it was stated quite unequivocally that it was unnecessary to
obtain special worms for a wormery, and that garden earthworms were as
good as anything.

It's a bit misleading, that site. He means that by adding garden soil
preferably turves or something with a high level of humus, you'll soon
get your own supply of brandlings which breed quickly and like the high
humus conditions of the compost heap - ie brandlings are one of the
several species of worm that are around in the garden, and it's a bit of
a waste of money to buy them - if you have the right conditions, they'll
breed, if you don't have the right conditions, even bought ones won't be
happy.
--
Kay
"Do not insult the crocodile until you have crossed the river"

  #79   Report Post  
Old 08-02-2005, 11:21 PM
Kay
 
Posts: n/a
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In article , suspicious minds me-
writes


Firstly, the worms were sold to me by a firm which specialises in worm
composting accessories.


In which case they will not be 'earthworms'.

Secondly, that url to which Kay used to draw our attention was written
by someone whose professional research is concerned with a study of
worms.
Do I believe him ot you?


As I studied the ecology of Earthworms extensively at university, I would
suggest a third possibility: you have incorrectly remembered what you read
on this site. If you would care to provide a direct link to your evidence,
I will, of course, apologise. Similarly, if it turns out that you are
mistaken, perhaps you could do the decent thing?


I have read the site that Franz is on about and indeed it does say that the
worms for composting can be obtained from your garden. What I think confuses
Franz is the different types of worms that can be found in the garden. The
site mentions that tiger worms etc are just fancy names for what are
commonly known as brandlings (Eisenia foetida) and redworms and can easily
be collected from compost heaps and under stones etc. It does not say that
earthworms( Lumbricus terrestis) which found on lawns etc and are commonly
known as lobworms are suitable for wormeries.I do not have the URL


http://www.scarboro.demon.co.uk/edward/index.htm
--
Kay
"Do not insult the crocodile until you have crossed the river"



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