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Old 20-02-2005, 10:09 AM
Ian Keeling
 
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Default Shade tolerant hedge, screen or climber

I am looking for suggestions for a plant for a hedge/screen in a rather
awkward spot. The problem is a passageway which runs more or less
north-south between two houses. So it receives no direct sun at all. I also
imagine that the passage will act as a funnel for wind! An impossible task?

I would be tempted to give up on this spot, but it's rather a key location,
as it's immediately opposite the dining room window. So I'd like to create a
prospect which is a little less uninspiring than the current view of an
ill-maintained and very unsightly 8' fence.

Ideally I would want to find something which is either free standing or can
be grown on a trellis in front of the fence (the fence itself is on the
neighbouring property and I understand that its maintenance has been the
cause of some dispute, which I'd rather not get too involved with).
Fast-growing would be good, too! I'm not desperately keen on ivies, except
for the variegated forms (which, of course are likely to lose their
variegation in this shady position).

I've read that Pyracantha "Golden Sun" is supposed to be good in deep shade,
but I fear the wind might be a problem.

Any suggestions at all?!



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Old 20-02-2005, 11:23 AM
Nick Maclaren
 
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In article ,
Ian Keeling wrote:

I am looking for suggestions for a plant for a hedge/screen in a rather
awkward spot. The problem is a passageway which runs more or less
north-south between two houses. So it receives no direct sun at all. I also
imagine that the passage will act as a funnel for wind! An impossible task?


Yes and no. If it gets enough light and rain, then there is no
problem. Otherwise ....

How wide, long and high is the gap? And where are you, and why did
you mention the wind?

Fast-growing would be good, too! I'm not desperately keen on ivies, except
for the variegated forms (which, of course are likely to lose their
variegation in this shady position).


A 'fedge' is definitely your best bet, and there are lots of plausible
climbers that might do. If there is enough space, there are some fairly
good narrow shrubs - I grow Chaenomeles speciosa "Nivalis" in a place
that gets no direct sun, and it does well and flowers well.

I've read that Pyracantha "Golden Sun" is supposed to be good in deep shade,
but I fear the wind might be a problem.


I doubt that it is! I doubt that the wind would be a problem, but the
thorns might be.

Ivy (and I mean Hedera helix) is pretty well the only evergreen climber
that is both really hardy in the UK and tolerate of deep shade; I have
heard mixed reports on H. colchica, but cannot speak from experience.

I have grown all of Akebia quinata, Lonicera periclymenum and Clematis
vitalba in darkish conditions, but the last definitely doesn't do much
until it reaches brighter ones.

If you have enough room, don't forget the low-growing plants. There
are a LOT of woodland plants that are very shade-tolerant indeed.


Regards,
Nick Maclaren.
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Old 20-02-2005, 12:12 PM
Ian Keeling
 
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Yes and no. If it gets enough light and rain, then there is no
problem. Otherwise ....

How wide, long and high is the gap? And where are you, and why did
you mention the wind?


Light may well be a problem. The gap is widish - maybe 10' between the house
and fence and perhaps the same distance between the fence and the
neighbouring house. But it's a long gap and the houses are not small. I
mentioned the wind, because it might be a significant factor for Pyracantha
"Golden Sun". The location is London suburbs, so there are unlikely to be
many severe frosts (but it's not the warmest position!)

Ivy (and I mean Hedera helix) is pretty well the only evergreen climber
that is both really hardy in the UK and tolerate of deep shade; I have
heard mixed reports on H. colchica, but cannot speak from experience.

I have grown all of Akebia quinata, Lonicera periclymenum and Clematis
vitalba in darkish conditions, but the last definitely doesn't do much
until it reaches brighter ones.


Thanks - some interesting suggestions. Akebia looks like a good contender -
seems to spread pretty well, which could be useful.

If you have enough room, don't forget the low-growing plants. There
are a LOT of woodland plants that are very shade-tolerant indeed.


Thanks - I have lots of favourite shrubs and low growing plants for shade in
mind (Sarcococca, Ruscus, Iris foetidissima, etc.) - the big problem is the
height of this fence, so really want a fairly vigorous climber/hedge...
Perhaps Aucuba japonica f. longifolia would do (though I haven't seen it
recommended for full shade).


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Old 20-02-2005, 12:33 PM
Nick Maclaren
 
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In article ,
Ian Keeling wrote:

Light may well be a problem. The gap is widish - maybe 10' between the house
and fence and perhaps the same distance between the fence and the
neighbouring house. But it's a long gap and the houses are not small. I
mentioned the wind, because it might be a significant factor for Pyracantha
"Golden Sun". The location is London suburbs, so there are unlikely to be
many severe frosts (but it's not the warmest position!)


How wide and high are the houses? 30' (standard biggish two-story)?
If so, I think that you are in luck.

I should be surprised if the wind in London suburbs is serious enough
to affect even a delicate pyracantha.

Thanks - some interesting suggestions. Akebia looks like a good contender -
seems to spread pretty well, which could be useful.


It does - and layers itself, given half a chance! With that width,
you might do OK with Lonicera japonica, too, but don't bother with
the American ones and hybrids. You could also try several of
the clematis - C. alpina can be pruned back as hard as you like
after flowering, and will then grow herbaceously to 8-10'. Even
C. armandii might be OK.

I don't have any idea how things like Holboellia would do, but you
might also like to consider winter jasmine. While it would need
continual training, it is a great improver of winter gloom. Also,
Viburnum farreri (fragrans) might do, but make sure you get an
upright form - it gets to 10'+.


Regards,
Nick Maclaren.
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Old 20-02-2005, 03:08 PM
JennyC
 
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"Ian Keeling" wrote in message
...
I am looking for suggestions for a plant for a hedge/screen in a rather
awkward spot. The problem is a passageway which runs more or less
north-south between two houses. So it receives no direct sun at all. I also
imagine that the passage will act as a funnel for wind! An impossible task?

snipped

What about a climbing hydrangea?
They love shade :~)
http://www.bbc.co.uk/gardening/plant...ages/397.shtml

You could train it against the fence
Jenny




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Old 20-02-2005, 06:43 PM
Charlie Pridham
 
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"Nick Maclaren" wrote in message
...
In article ,
Ian Keeling wrote:

Light may well be a problem. The gap is widish - maybe 10' between the

house
and fence and perhaps the same distance between the fence and the
neighbouring house. But it's a long gap and the houses are not small. I
mentioned the wind, because it might be a significant factor for

Pyracantha
"Golden Sun". The location is London suburbs, so there are unlikely to be
many severe frosts (but it's not the warmest position!)


How wide and high are the houses? 30' (standard biggish two-story)?
If so, I think that you are in luck.

I should be surprised if the wind in London suburbs is serious enough
to affect even a delicate pyracantha.

Thanks - some interesting suggestions. Akebia looks like a good

contender -
seems to spread pretty well, which could be useful.


It does - and layers itself, given half a chance! With that width,
you might do OK with Lonicera japonica, too, but don't bother with
the American ones and hybrids. You could also try several of
the clematis - C. alpina can be pruned back as hard as you like
after flowering, and will then grow herbaceously to 8-10'. Even
C. armandii might be OK.

I don't have any idea how things like Holboellia would do, but you
might also like to consider winter jasmine. While it would need
continual training, it is a great improver of winter gloom. Also,
Viburnum farreri (fragrans) might do, but make sure you get an
upright form - it gets to 10'+.


Regards,
Nick Maclaren.


Cissus striata is proving good in dense shade down here came from Rosemoor
so it should be fine in London.

--
Charlie, gardening in Cornwall.
http://www.roselandhouse.co.uk
Holders of National Plant Collection of Clematis viticella (cvs)


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Old 23-02-2005, 09:51 AM
Ian Keeling
 
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Default

Thanks all! I now have a good shortlist of plants to investigate further.


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