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Old 28-04-2005, 09:16 PM
Ian Stirling
 
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Default Repairing poly-tunnels.

The cover on my 5*10m poly-tunnel (approx) ripped one night in a strong
gale. (right across the circumference, and half way along the length)

Taking some thick twine, and punching holes in each side every 2cm or so,
and then lacing up the split edges has worked well.

Start out with a fairly loose gap, and then you can gradually bring the
edges together.

So far has lasted about 3 months, in fairly strong winds.

Tips.
Use a blunt pointed object to punch the holes - a sharp one will mean
it's easier to tear the string out.

Start with a long length of string - twice as long as you want to work
with, pull halfway through, then work to the ends - this will make
it easier to tighten up later.

I found it easier to lace it so that it on the outside, it looks
like dashes along the sides, with string crossing on the insides
directly across the cut.

I used baler twine, which is a 3mm or so plastic string, which can easily
be melted into a nice point.

Not advocating this, just thought that others might find it interesting.

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Old 28-04-2005, 09:31 PM
Mike
 
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Default


Tips.
Use a blunt pointed object to punch the holes - a sharp one will mean
it's easier to tear the string out.


Another tip. (But not 'truly' related to the above but does apply)
Any material or metal which is 'tearing', can be stopped going further, by
drilling a hole at the end of the existing tear.

Mike


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Old 28-04-2005, 10:01 PM
Mary Fisher
 
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"Mike" wrote in message
...

Tips.
Use a blunt pointed object to punch the holes - a sharp one will mean
it's easier to tear the string out.


Another tip. (But not 'truly' related to the above but does apply)
Any material or metal which is 'tearing', can be stopped going further, by
drilling a hole at the end of the existing tear.


Some kind of eyelet, even if only one or two washers, would also help to
take the strain on the cord and prevent splitting.

Mary

Mike




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Old 28-04-2005, 10:05 PM
Mike Lyle
 
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Default

Mary Fisher wrote:
"Mike" wrote in message
...

Tips.
Use a blunt pointed object to punch the holes - a sharp one will
mean it's easier to tear the string out.


Another tip. (But not 'truly' related to the above but does apply)
Any material or metal which is 'tearing', can be stopped going
further, by drilling a hole at the end of the existing tear.


Some kind of eyelet, even if only one or two washers, would also

help
to take the strain on the cord and prevent splitting.


I'd guess that you could make very effective eyelets for the purpose
by punching holes in squares of gaffer tape or Duck tape. (Actually,
I'd consider doing the whole repair with this kind of tape.)

--
Mike.


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Old 28-04-2005, 11:06 PM
Mary Fisher
 
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Default


"Mike Lyle" wrote in message
...

Some kind of eyelet, even if only one or two washers, would also

help
to take the strain on the cord and prevent splitting.


I'd guess that you could make very effective eyelets for the purpose
by punching holes in squares of gaffer tape or Duck tape.


Oh yes, of course! I expect I would have thought of that, given time ...

(Actually,
I'd consider doing the whole repair with this kind of tape.)


Looks awful though!

Mary

--
Mike.






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Old 29-04-2005, 01:03 AM
Howard Neil
 
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Default

Mary Fisher wrote:
"Mike Lyle" wrote in message
...

Some kind of eyelet, even if only one or two washers, would also


help

to take the strain on the cord and prevent splitting.


I'd guess that you could make very effective eyelets for the purpose
by punching holes in squares of gaffer tape or Duck tape.



Oh yes, of course! I expect I would have thought of that, given time ...


(Actually,
I'd consider doing the whole repair with this kind of tape.)



Looks awful though!


You can buy a special tape for this. It is like a very strong sellotape,
at least as strong as Duck tape but clear(ish).

One further thought re making holes for lacing (interesting idea, this).
If you melt the holes (small gas soldering iron?), the plastic will melt
out from the centre, leaving a plastic collar as a reinforcement.


--
Howard Neil
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Old 29-04-2005, 09:51 AM
Mary Fisher
 
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"Howard Neil" wrote in message
...
Mary Fisher wrote:
"Mike Lyle" wrote in message
...

Some kind of eyelet, even if only one or two washers, would also

help

to take the strain on the cord and prevent splitting.

I'd guess that you could make very effective eyelets for the purpose
by punching holes in squares of gaffer tape or Duck tape.



Oh yes, of course! I expect I would have thought of that, given time ...


(Actually,
I'd consider doing the whole repair with this kind of tape.)



Looks awful though!


You can buy a special tape for this. It is like a very strong sellotape,
at least as strong as Duck tape but clear(ish).


"ish" is the operative word. It's not the same colour as the poly and if it
is to start with,in my experience, it yellows.

Lacing is decorative and makes a feature out of a disaster.

One further thought re making holes for lacing (interesting idea, this).
If you melt the holes (small gas soldering iron?), the plastic will melt
out from the centre, leaving a plastic collar as a reinforcement.


Could do, if you're very skilled :-) I wouldn't do it but there again I
never handle a soldering iron of any kind these days.

Mary


--
Howard Neil



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Old 29-04-2005, 10:28 AM
Howard Neil
 
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Default

Mary Fisher wrote:
"Howard Neil" wrote in message
...


You can buy a special tape for this. It is like a very strong sellotape,
at least as strong as Duck tape but clear(ish).



"ish" is the operative word. It's not the same colour as the poly and if it
is to start with,in my experience, it yellows.


The tape I use is the same colour as the poly and stays the same colour.
I had to apply some about 5 years ago and it is still the same colour
today. There must be different qualities on the market.


Lacing is decorative and makes a feature out of a disaster.


I certainly like the sound of it.


One further thought re making holes for lacing (interesting idea, this).
If you melt the holes (small gas soldering iron?), the plastic will melt
out from the centre, leaving a plastic collar as a reinforcement.



Could do, if you're very skilled :-) I wouldn't do it but there again I
never handle a soldering iron of any kind these days.


I think the word "careful" should replace "skilled". I would not think
there could be much skill at poking plastic with a soldering iron.

--
Howard Neil
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Old 29-04-2005, 11:19 AM
Bob Mannix
 
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Default


"Howard Neil" wrote in message
...
Mary Fisher wrote:
"Howard Neil" wrote in message
...


You can buy a special tape for this. It is like a very strong sellotape,
at least as strong as Duck tape but clear(ish).



"ish" is the operative word. It's not the same colour as the poly and if

it
is to start with,in my experience, it yellows.


The tape I use is the same colour as the poly and stays the same colour.
I had to apply some about 5 years ago and it is still the same colour
today. There must be different qualities on the market.


After the mice ate my tent ( I had to repair a hole in the plastic
windows (it's a big tent). You can get plastic tape for this purpose. So far
it has stayed put and not yellowed. Try a camping shop.


--
Bob Mannix
(anti-spam is as easy as 1-2-3 - not)


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Old 29-04-2005, 01:26 PM
doozer
 
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Default

Bob Mannix wrote:
"Howard Neil" wrote in message
...

Mary Fisher wrote:

"Howard Neil" wrote in message
...


You can buy a special tape for this. It is like a very strong sellotape,
at least as strong as Duck tape but clear(ish).


"ish" is the operative word. It's not the same colour as the poly and if


it

is to start with,in my experience, it yellows.


The tape I use is the same colour as the poly and stays the same colour.
I had to apply some about 5 years ago and it is still the same colour
today. There must be different qualities on the market.



After the mice ate my tent ( I had to repair a hole in the plastic
windows (it's a big tent). You can get plastic tape for this purpose. So far
it has stayed put and not yellowed. Try a camping shop.



Maybe I am just missing something here because it's been a while since I
played with poly tunnels but couldn't you just use plastic cement to
glue the parts back together?

--

..`..` Shallow Sea Aquatics ..`..`
..`.. http://www.shallowsea.com .`..`


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Old 29-04-2005, 02:44 PM
Mary Fisher
 
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Default


"Howard Neil" wrote in message
...
Mary Fisher wrote:
"Howard Neil" wrote in message
...


You can buy a special tape for this. It is like a very strong sellotape,
at least as strong as Duck tape but clear(ish).



"ish" is the operative word. It's not the same colour as the poly and if
it is to start with,in my experience, it yellows.


The tape I use is the same colour as the poly and stays the same colour. I
had to apply some about 5 years ago and it is still the same colour today.
There must be different qualities on the market.


Lacing is decorative and makes a feature out of a disaster.


I certainly like the sound of it.


One further thought re making holes for lacing (interesting idea, this).
If you melt the holes (small gas soldering iron?), the plastic will melt
out from the centre, leaving a plastic collar as a reinforcement.



Could do, if you're very skilled :-) I wouldn't do it but there again I
never handle a soldering iron of any kind these days.


I think the word "careful" should replace "skilled". I would not think
there could be much skill at poking plastic with a soldering iron.


The skill comes in understanding the properties of the material you're
working with, using the right size and temperature of iron for the right
amount of time.

You didn't specify "poking plastic" originally. Is that what you'd do?

Mary

--
Howard Neil



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Old 29-04-2005, 05:42 PM
Toolmaker
 
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Default

"doozer" wrote
Maybe I am just missing something here because it's been a while since I
played with poly tunnels but couldn't you just use plastic cement to glue
the parts back together?


Problem is that there is no glue or solvent in existence that will glue
polyethylene.


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Old 29-04-2005, 05:57 PM
Howard Neil
 
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Default

Mary Fisher wrote:

You didn't specify "poking plastic" originally. Is that what you'd do?


Yes. I use the same principle in my veg patch. I cover it with old
silage sheet and make holes with a blow lamp. The sheet melts back to
produce a hard ring and a nice clean hole to plant the veg through. It
is quick and easy to do and I was simply transferring the same idea to
the polytunnel (scaled down, of course). I have some old poly somewhere,
I'll give it a try.

--
Howard Neil
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Old 29-04-2005, 06:32 PM
Peter Stockdale
 
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Default


"Toolmaker" wrote in message
...
"
Problem is that there is no glue or solvent in existence that will glue
polyethylene.




How can this be true ?
As a previous poster has said, there is a readily available sticky tape
specifically produced to repair tares in the poly.
I have some and use it with much success.
It is coated with glue which sticks like crazy to the poly.
The adhesive may not be generally available as a stand alone product which
we can buy in tins, but I feel it is untrue to state that there is no glue
that will glue poly(eth?)ythene - or whatever a polytun is constructed with.

Regards
Pete
www.thecanalshop.com



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Old 29-04-2005, 07:56 PM
Mike Lyle
 
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Default

Peter Stockdale wrote:
"Toolmaker" wrote in message
...
"
Problem is that there is no glue or solvent in existence that will
glue polyethylene.




How can this be true ?
As a previous poster has said, there is a readily available sticky
tape specifically produced to repair tares in the poly.
I have some and use it with much success.
It is coated with glue which sticks like crazy to the poly.
The adhesive may not be generally available as a stand alone

product
which we can buy in tins, but I feel it is untrue to state that

there
is no glue that will glue poly(eth?)ythene - or whatever a polytun

is
constructed with.


Perfect logic, but the fact remains that there isn't a glue for
poly[ethyl]ene, which isn't a million miles different from ptfe, the
non-stick frying-pan stuff. It's always joined by welding. The
problem is, I think, that the adhesives on gaffer tape and such-like,
while they will stick well to polythene till they dry out a few years
later, can't be applied in amateur conditions.

--
Mike.




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