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Old 22-05-2005, 10:04 AM
Ben Blaney
 
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Sacha wrote:

--
Sacha
www.hillhousenursery.co.uk
South Devon


Your business will get no custom from me, based upon your behaviour in
this thread.

--
Ben Blaney
  #49   Report Post  
Old 23-05-2005, 11:43 AM
Ben Blaney
 
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Alan Holmes wrote:

"Ben Blaney" wrote in message
.. .
Sacha wrote:

Actually June, I know quite a lot about you. You're a spoiled brat.


You don't strike me as a terribly pleasant person.


You haven't met her!


I never met Genghis Khan, either.

--
Ben Blaney
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Old 24-05-2005, 07:05 PM
Gregoire Kretz
 
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Ben Blaney wrote:

Alan Holmes wrote:

You haven't met her!


I never met Genghis Khan, either.


Which show was he on? The gardening or the cooking one?



Greg
--
And just a nagging doubt remains

No spam: ficus = no(n)


  #51   Report Post  
Old 03-06-2005, 09:58 AM
The Reids
 
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Following up to Sacha

No offence intended.

Offensive is your middle name - you can't help it.


as a poster in food+drink I can tell you June never causes any
offence here, so the problem must be elsewhere. If I was you,
posting above my business address, I would adopt a more
professional tone on usenet and also killfile anyone who you cant
get on with.
--
Mike Reid
Wasdale-Thames path-London-Photos "http://www.fellwalk.co.uk" -- you can email [email protected] this site
Eat-walk-Spain "http://www.fell-walker.co.uk" -- [email protected] all, it's a spamtrap
  #53   Report Post  
Old 15-06-2005, 05:46 PM
doug
 
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"Harold Walker" wrote in message
...

wrote in message
oups.com...
AFAIK thay are tomatoes allowed to ripen naturally, most tomatoes in
the shops are picked green, then artificially ripened when they arrive
in the UK. They certainly do ahve a much nicer taste that the
equivalent loose ones.

Mike

I find this interesting....how long have they been imported this way in
the UK...for many years on the western edges of the big puddle tomatoes
have been shipped from Florida to the north via a lorry filled with
ethylene gas...by the time they arrive up north they too have been
converted from green to red...taste wis would just as soon eat cardboard.
We too now have the 'vine ripened' ones. While better than the lorry
ripened ones they are still far from the local or home grown
jobbies....but not worth the asking price....H


**********

I agree with all you say. I knew that many years ago bananas were ripened
in ship-transit by filling the holds with what I vaguely remember was,
perhaps, ethyline.
As far as my knowledge is competent I have always thought that some breeds
of tomatoes grow racemes of tomatoes on single-shoot stems which have the
tomatoes going down the stems singly, just like the more expensive ones sold
wrapped in a cardboard carton, each having a cellophane lid to display the
tomatoes, - (I have a packet in my fridge as I write,) -
On some of the other tomato plants I have grown the stem splits and splays
_(or "sprays") out and the tomatoes grow, each on its own, but clustered
together in a bunch.
On another tack, - correct me if I am wrong, but tomatoes will, - if left to
grow on themselves, - the main stem will divide and the plant grows and
forms itelf into a bush shape.
I would appreciate a professional opinion.
Doug.

**********


  #54   Report Post  
Old 15-06-2005, 06:31 PM
doug
 
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"Harold Walker" wrote in message
...

"Pam Moore" wrote in message
...
On Wed, 18 May 2005 13:58:05 GMT, "graham" wrote:

My local supermarket (in Calgary) often has Dutch ones! The cost of
flying
them that far must be horrendous!


When I was in Canada 2 years ago (Vancouver to Calgary) we were amazed
that we seldom saw a tomato in any hotel or restaurant. We were told
that they are very expensive because most are exported to USA! What
is the world playing at? LOL

Pam in Bristol


The Yanks were/are suckers enough to pay the high prices for them...I
bought a single tomato to 'check 'em out'....not even good enough for
fried tomatoes...H


**********
My wife and I visited friends in Atlanta , Ga. U.S.A. in 1980.
They took us to a Fruit Market. It was colossal. In the open air it was
ten times bigger than anything I've seen in Old Blighty. Durban, Sth Africa,
or India.
In Atlanta all the produce was perfect, ripe and fresh from the fields and
'orchards'.
The Market was so big they had proper parking lots nearby with guides
stationed at vantage points to guide you where to park, and you travelled in
to the Market area on long wooden side-seat multi trolleys towed by
specially- built gay-painted tractors.
In the Market, long lines of large stalls with slanted-backwards shelves
groaning under the finest fresh produce made the mind boggle. There was no
"shouting their wares", you just chose what you wanted and the service was
impeccable and pleasant.
Those Southerners sure know how to live!.
( On another tack we ate at a place where you pay five dollars and down the
middle of the massive hall stands two very long rows of tables groaning
under every food known to man.
My host had, on a plate over a foot in diameter, - piled high, - a
massive heap of frogs legs. he scoffed the lot and went back for 'seconds'!.
Young lasses circled the tables topping up the vase-sized tumblers with iced
tea or coffee.
My wife , seven stone and a half in weight and five foot seven in height
opted for Black Gateaux for "afters", but when it came neither she or I
could eat half of it, so enormous was the helping.
er,....-- Sorry!, - I've wandered off-topic......
Doug.

**********


  #55   Report Post  
Old 28-06-2005, 04:14 PM
doug
 
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"sarah" wrote in message
k...
Noises Off wrote:

sarah wrote:

Noises Off wrote:


Alan Holmes wrote:


'Vine' tomatoes are becomming fairly common in the
shops, but:-

What, exactly, are 'Vine' tomatoes?

Isn't the main point of the 'vine' so that the check-out
person can distinguish them from ordinary tomatoes? And
charge you more.


nah, the plastic packaging and bar code do that :-)


Err, well, in the nicest possible way, err, no. In this
piece of paradise I call my own (south/central London) I
have seen loose 'vine' tomatoes in Marks & Sparks and
Costcutter.


I guess Waitrose doesn't trust its staff to recognise them :-)

regards
sarah
Think of it as evolution in action.


**********
30-odd answers to a simple question and all wrong.
Vine. -- Climbing or trailing plant with a woody stem, - esp. bearing
grapes.
Grapes grow on a stem and immediately divide into a close cluster.
"Vine tomatoes" is a misnomer because those called vine tomatoes grow
alongside each other in pairs down a *single stem*. Therefore they are not
growing in a cluster like a bunch of grapes.
Now hear this.
I always grow "some" of my tomatoes in such a fashion. i.e.Five stems up a
single trunk , each tomato alongside each other hanging down on a single
stem.
The other tomatoes I grow have a different habit. They don't grow hanging
down a single stem. They grow hanging down in a single cluster, all clusters
separate from each other and growing up a single trunk which bear five
trusses,each truss separate form each other by reason of different height on
the main trunk of the tomato plant..
It's all due to the breed of the tomato.
BTW, The single stemmed "in-line" tomatoes which we import at high prices
take a long time to properly ripen even though when you buy them they are
red coloured, but when you cut them open they are whitish inside and taste
horrible.
Doug.
***********




  #56   Report Post  
Old 28-06-2005, 06:37 PM
Tom Anderson
 
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Alan Holmes wrote:

'Vine' tomatoes are becomming fairly common in the shops, but:-

What, exactly, are 'Vine' tomatoes?


I remember well when they were first introduced. Then, they weren't called
vine tomatoes, or tomatoes on the vine, they were *vine-ripened* tomatoes,
and that's what they we tomatoes that had - god forbid! - actually been
allowed to ripen on the plant before being harvested and sold, so the
fruit you got had a discernable level of flavour. They were fabulous!

Now, these cost more to produce, since they have to be handled more
carefully, and there's more spoilage, but supermarkets found that people
were willing to pay a premium for them, so they were a viable product.
Soon after, however, supermarkets discovered that actually, people would
pay the premium even for unripe tomatoes, as long as they were on a vine,
having built up a Pavlovian cargo-cult response. Since rock-hard,
tasteless, unripe tomatoes are much cheaper to produce, selling 'vine
unripened' tomatoes (with the name changed to protect the guilty) was
money for old rope. Supermarkets do love a bit of money for old rope, and
since most shoppers are thick enough to buy said second-hand cord, vine
tomatoes have completely displaced vine-ripened tomatoes on the modern
shelf.

Oh, for the sunlit uplands of the late 90s, when ripe tomatoes could be
had on every high street!

tom

--
now you're under control and now you do what we told you
  #57   Report Post  
Old 28-06-2005, 09:58 PM
Nik
 
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"Tom Anderson" wrote in message
h.li...
Alan Holmes wrote:

'Vine' tomatoes are becomming fairly common in the shops, but:-

What, exactly, are 'Vine' tomatoes?


I remember well when they were first introduced. Then, they weren't called
vine tomatoes, or tomatoes on the vine, they were *vine-ripened* tomatoes,
and that's what they we tomatoes that had - god forbid! - actually been
allowed to ripen on the plant before being harvested and sold, so the
fruit you got had a discernable level of flavour. They were fabulous!

Now, these cost more to produce, since they have to be handled more
carefully, and there's more spoilage, but supermarkets found that people
were willing to pay a premium for them, so they were a viable product.
Soon after, however, supermarkets discovered that actually, people would
pay the premium even for unripe tomatoes, as long as they were on a vine,
having built up a Pavlovian cargo-cult response. Since rock-hard,
tasteless, unripe tomatoes are much cheaper to produce, selling 'vine
unripened' tomatoes (with the name changed to protect the guilty) was
money for old rope. Supermarkets do love a bit of money for old rope, and
since most shoppers are thick enough to buy said second-hand cord, vine
tomatoes have completely displaced vine-ripened tomatoes on the modern
shelf.

Oh, for the sunlit uplands of the late 90s, when ripe tomatoes could be
had on every high street!


One of the best things about our organic veg delivery is the taste of the
tomatoes. That is, the tomatoes actually have a taste.

Nik


  #58   Report Post  
Old 28-06-2005, 10:20 PM
graham
 
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"Nik" wrote in message
...


One of the best things about our organic veg delivery is the taste of the
tomatoes. That is, the tomatoes actually have a taste.



I'm not sure that it is the organic status but rather the short time from
the picking of optimumly ripe fruit to delivery.
Graham


  #59   Report Post  
Old 29-06-2005, 11:34 PM
doug
 
Posts: n/a
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"Tom Anderson" wrote in message
h.li...
Alan Holmes wrote:

'Vine' tomatoes are becomming fairly common in the shops, but:-

What, exactly, are 'Vine' tomatoes?


I remember well when they were first introduced. Then, they weren't called
vine tomatoes, or tomatoes on the vine, they were *vine-ripened* tomatoes,
and that's what they we tomatoes that had - god forbid! - actually been
allowed to ripen on the plant before being harvested and sold, so the
fruit you got had a discernable level of flavour. They were fabulous!

Now, these cost more to produce, since they have to be handled more
carefully, and there's more spoilage, but supermarkets found that people
were willing to pay a premium for them, so they were a viable product.
Soon after, however, supermarkets discovered that actually, people would
pay the premium even for unripe tomatoes, as long as they were on a vine,
having built up a Pavlovian cargo-cult response. Since rock-hard,
tasteless, unripe tomatoes are much cheaper to produce, selling 'vine
unripened' tomatoes (with the name changed to protect the guilty) was
money for old rope. Supermarkets do love a bit of money for old rope, and
since most shoppers are thick enough to buy said second-hand cord, vine
tomatoes have completely displaced vine-ripened tomatoes on the modern
shelf.

Oh, for the sunlit uplands of the late 90s, when ripe tomatoes could be
had on every high street!

tom now you're under control and now you do what we told you


**********
I agree with your final paragraph which ends..., 'tomatoes on the modern
shelf'.
All contributors to this thread have ignored the real truth, - which is, -
Those tasteless tomatoes are being grown in carefully controlled conditions
and all encompasses the real reason they are awful.
They are grown in water.
Doug.
**********




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