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taking fuschia seed?



 
 
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  #1  
Old 18-09-2004, 05:56 PM
Matthew Durkin
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Default taking fuschia seed?

Can I collect the pods from my Fuschias and grow them from seed next spring?
They laster outside last winter but I think I was lucky!
If not, can I take cuttings, and what is the best way to do this? I'd like
more than last year as I'm going to put some in my hanging baskets...
Thanks,
Matthew


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  #2  
Old 18-09-2004, 06:10 PM
Phil L
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Matthew Durkin wrote:
:: Can I collect the pods from my Fuschias and grow them from seed
:: next spring? They laster outside last winter but I think I was
:: lucky!
:: If not, can I take cuttings, and what is the best way to do this?
:: I'd like more than last year as I'm going to put some in my
:: hanging baskets... Thanks,
:: Matthew

My fuscias have been outside for over ten years! - seriously.
Each November we just cut back the stalks and leave them..every spring they
bounce up...I took 12 smallish twigs round about July and put them into
compost with no rooting powder or anything else and ten of them have took,
two have even flowered..you may have left them a bit late now as it's
getting colder every week...if you've got a heated greenhouse you could try
it...don't know about seeds though.

The ten cuttings I have are for next years baskets, but while we are on the
subject of fuschias, those that are in the beds are getting a bit 'iffy' -
lots of foilage and not many flowers, plus they all seem to be exactly the
same colours(purple/white) when I'm sure they were mixed when new....what I
would like to do is take them all up, renovate the beds and add a few CWT of
free manure, then replant with different coloured ones interspersed..any
clues?

HTH & TIA!


  #3  
Old 18-09-2004, 08:25 PM
Mike Lyle
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Default


"Phil L" wrote in message
...
Matthew Durkin wrote:
:: Can I collect the pods from my Fuschias and grow them from seed
:: next spring? They laster outside last winter but I think I was
:: lucky!
:: If not, can I take cuttings, and what is the best way to do

this?
:: I'd like more than last year as I'm going to put some in my
:: hanging baskets... Thanks,
:: Matthew

My fuscias have been outside for over ten years! - seriously.
Each November we just cut back the stalks and leave them..every

spring they
bounce up...I took 12 smallish twigs round about July and put them

into
compost with no rooting powder or anything else and ten of them

have took,
two have even flowered..you may have left them a bit late now as

it's
getting colder every week...if you've got a heated greenhouse you

could try
it...don't know about seeds though.

The ten cuttings I have are for next years baskets, but while we

are on the
subject of fuschias, those that are in the beds are getting a bit

'iffy' -
lots of foilage and not many flowers, plus they all seem to be

exactly the
same colours(purple/white) when I'm sure they were mixed when

new....what I
would like to do is take them all up, renovate the beds and add a

few CWT of
free manure, then replant with different coloured ones

interspersed..any
clues?


So many fuchsias, so little time! Until you try, you never really
know which ones will survive outdoors in your particular conditions.
And since British conditions are so variable, you may have success
for several years in some particular place, and then one year lose
the lot. Meanwhile, your sister in the east may have lost hers two
years running, and have given up trying. It helps if you cover the
stools with a good layer of peat or bracken or something to protect
them from the frosts. Personally I wouldn't use strong manure, as
that might promote disease: manure round the plants later, when the
new shoots are going for it.

I've successfully taken cuttings at every time of year except dead of
winter; but until I moved, I had spare rooms in the house in which to
over-winter my plants. I have little experience with the trailing
types.

Seeds will grow: no problem at all. But, as everybody always says,
seeds from these complicated hybrids will probably be completely
unlike their parents. Good fun, but if all you want is half a dozen
plants to look good in your garden, it's safer just to propagate from
what you've got, or buy in new every year or two. And if you let the
seed-pods mature you'll get fewer flowers.

There's a British Fuchsia Society for detailed information (they must
have a website). I believe the real enthusiasts make jam or jelly
from the pods. I'd love to try, but I'm too lazy.

Mike.


  #4  
Old 19-09-2004, 10:15 AM
Registered User
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Sep 2004
Location: Kent
Posts: 8
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Matthew Durkin
Can I collect the pods from my Fuschias and grow them from seed next spring?
They laster outside last winter but I think I was lucky!
If not, can I take cuttings, and what is the best way to do this? I'd like
more than last year as I'm going to put some in my hanging baskets...
Thanks,
Matthew
Cuttings is the most reliable (and easy) way to get more plants. Take them now and watch them sprout.

If your fuschias are medium to small flowered, they'll be good and hardy and easily survive outside - provided the roots don't freeze, same as most plants. The bigger and showier the flowers the less hardy, rough rule of thumb.
  #5  
Old 19-09-2004, 01:37 PM
kathleen syson
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Posts: n/a
Default

I have several plants dotted around the garden. As previous respondent
says, smaller flowers tend to be hardier. I have loads in LARGE pots and at
the moment I have numerous cuttings in a glass of water in the window ledge.
Don't change the water; just top it up, remove any flowers which form and
you will see the roots start to grow. I always pot mine up when there's
plenty of roots and then put them in compost and keep them either in window
ledges through the winter or in my shed. I get more and more each year.
Chakoteya wrote in message ...

Matthew Durkin Wrote:
Can I collect the pods from my Fuschias and grow them from seed next
spring?
They laster outside last winter but I think I was lucky!
If not, can I take cuttings, and what is the best way to do this? I'd
like
more than last year as I'm going to put some in my hanging baskets...
Thanks,
Matthew


Cuttings is the most reliable (and easy) way to get more plants. Take
them now and watch them sprout.

If your fuschias are medium to small flowered, they'll be good and
hardy and easily survive outside - provided the roots don't freeze,
same as most plants. The bigger and showier the flowers the less hardy,
rough rule of thumb.


--
Chakoteya



 




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