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Old 25-05-2010, 09:37 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Loganberries

I have a couple of strong healthy plants that produce a god crop,
however each year I wonder how to cope with the new shoots for next
years fruit.

They manage to intertwine with this years shhots, making it difficult to
find the ripening fruits (as well as obscuring them) and as they are
quite fragile, they often get broken or damaged.

What is the best thing to do/ some thoughts include:

Using two seprate sets of wires a foot or so apart and direct the new
onea to the opposite set (not really practical for me due to space
considerations)

Tie the new shoots together as they grow and pag them down close to the
ground.

Cut out most of the new shoots as they appear, just leaving the 6-8 I
usually have per plant to develop

Any other ideas please?

Roger T

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Old 25-05-2010, 09:55 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Location: South Wales
Posts: 2,409
Default Loganberries

On 25 May, 21:37, Roger & Barbara Tonkin
wrote:
I have a couple of strong healthy plants that produce a god crop,
however each year I wonder how to cope with the new shoots for next
years fruit.

They manage to intertwine with this years shhots, making it difficult to
find the ripening fruits (as well as obscuring them) and as they are
quite fragile, they often get broken or damaged.

What is the best thing to do/ some thoughts include:

Using two seprate sets of wires a foot or so apart and direct the new
onea to the opposite set (not really practical for me due to space
considerations)

Tie the new shoots together as they grow and pag them down close to the
ground.

Cut out most of the new shoots as they appear, just leaving the 6-8 I
usually have per plant to develop

Any other ideas please?

Roger T


In my youth we used to grow around 3/4 of an acre of blackberries, we
used to tie in the new growth in one direction whilst the old fruiting
growth was trained in the opposite direction, then at the end of the
year we just had to cut out the old growth and the space was ready for
the following years new growth.
David Hill
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Old 25-05-2010, 10:53 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Posts: 5,056
Default Loganberries



"Dave Hill" wrote...
wrote:
I have a couple of strong healthy plants that produce a god crop,
however each year I wonder how to cope with the new shoots for next
years fruit.

They manage to intertwine with this years shhots, making it difficult to
find the ripening fruits (as well as obscuring them) and as they are
quite fragile, they often get broken or damaged.

What is the best thing to do/ some thoughts include:

Using two seprate sets of wires a foot or so apart and direct the new
onea to the opposite set (not really practical for me due to space
considerations)

Tie the new shoots together as they grow and pag them down close to the
ground.

Cut out most of the new shoots as they appear, just leaving the 6-8 I
usually have per plant to develop

Any other ideas please?

In my youth we used to grow around 3/4 of an acre of blackberries, we
used to tie in the new growth in one direction whilst the old fruiting
growth was trained in the opposite direction, then at the end of the
year we just had to cut out the old growth and the space was ready for
the following years new growth.


We do similar with out Loganberry, the flowering shoots are trained to
either side and the new shoots grow straight up and are tied there until
after flowering.

--
Regards
Bob Hobden
W.of London. UK

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Old 26-05-2010, 02:42 PM
kay kay is offline
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Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Roger & Barbara Tonkin View Post
I have a couple of strong healthy plants that produce a god crop,
however each year I wonder how to cope with the new shoots for next
years fruit.
If as Bob suggests you tie the fruiting shoots to the sides and the new shoots straight up it doesn't take any more space. The new shoots don't have to be fanned out and given space, they can all go in a bundle - it's not for very long. Then as soon as the fruiting finishes, cut out all the old shoots and you are ready to spread out and tie in the new shoots.
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Old 27-05-2010, 02:35 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Loganberries

The message
from "Bob Hobden" contains these words:



"Dave Hill" wrote...
wrote:
I have a couple of strong healthy plants that produce a god crop,
however each year I wonder how to cope with the new shoots for next
years fruit.

They manage to intertwine with this years shhots, making it difficult to
find the ripening fruits (as well as obscuring them) and as they are
quite fragile, they often get broken or damaged.

What is the best thing to do/ some thoughts include:

Using two seprate sets of wires a foot or so apart and direct the new
onea to the opposite set (not really practical for me due to space
considerations)

Tie the new shoots together as they grow and pag them down close to the
ground.

Cut out most of the new shoots as they appear, just leaving the 6-8 I
usually have per plant to develop

Any other ideas please?

In my youth we used to grow around 3/4 of an acre of blackberries, we
used to tie in the new growth in one direction whilst the old fruiting
growth was trained in the opposite direction, then at the end of the
year we just had to cut out the old growth and the space was ready for
the following years new growth.


We do similar with out Loganberry, the flowering shoots are trained to
either side and the new shoots grow straight up and are tied there until
after flowering.


Thanks for the suggestions.

Space (or lack of it) precludes the first suggestion.

A lowish fruit cage (there are redcurrants with the loganberries
precludes the second.

Sorry!

Any thoughts on eliminating all but a few of the new shhots as a way of
keeping things a bit clear?

Roger T


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Old 27-05-2010, 05:12 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Location: South Wales
Posts: 2,409
Default Loganberries

On 27 May, 14:35, Roger & Barbara Tonkin
wrote:
The message
from "Bob Hobden" contains these words:





"Dave Hill" *wrote...
wrote:
I have a couple of strong healthy plants that produce a god crop,
however each year I wonder how to cope with the new shoots for next
years fruit.


They manage to intertwine with this years shhots, making it difficult to
find the ripening fruits (as well as obscuring them) and as they are
quite fragile, they often get broken or damaged.


What is the best thing to do/ some thoughts include:


Using two seprate sets of wires a foot or so apart and direct the new
onea to the opposite set (not really practical for me due to space
considerations)


Tie the new shoots together as they grow and pag them down close to the
ground.


Cut out most of the new shoots as they appear, just leaving the 6-8 I
usually have per plant to develop


Any other ideas please?
In my youth we used to grow around 3/4 of an acre of blackberries, we
used to tie in the new growth in one direction whilst the old fruiting
growth was trained in the opposite direction, then at the end of the
year we just had to cut out the old growth and the space was ready for
the following years new growth.

We do similar with out Loganberry, the flowering shoots are trained to
either side and the new shoots grow straight up and are tied there until
after flowering.


Thanks for the suggestions.

Space (or lack of it) precludes the first suggestion.

A lowish fruit cage (there are redcurrants with the loganberries
precludes the second.

Sorry!

Any thoughts on eliminating all but a few of the new shhots as a way of
keeping things a bit clear?

Roger T- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -


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Old 27-05-2010, 05:17 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Feb 2007
Location: South Wales
Posts: 2,409
Default Loganberries

On 27 May, 14:35, Roger & Barbara Tonkin
wrote:
The message
from "Bob Hobden" contains these words:





"Dave Hill" *wrote...
wrote:
I have a couple of strong healthy plants that produce a god crop,
however each year I wonder how to cope with the new shoots for next
years fruit.


They manage to intertwine with this years shhots, making it difficult to
find the ripening fruits (as well as obscuring them) and as they are
quite fragile, they often get broken or damaged.


What is the best thing to do/ some thoughts include:


Using two seprate sets of wires a foot or so apart and direct the new
onea to the opposite set (not really practical for me due to space
considerations)


Tie the new shoots together as they grow and pag them down close to the
ground.


Cut out most of the new shoots as they appear, just leaving the 6-8 I
usually have per plant to develop


Any other ideas please?
In my youth we used to grow around 3/4 of an acre of blackberries, we
used to tie in the new growth in one direction whilst the old fruiting
growth was trained in the opposite direction, then at the end of the
year we just had to cut out the old growth and the space was ready for
the following years new growth.

We do similar with out Loganberry, the flowering shoots are trained to
either side and the new shoots grow straight up and are tied there until
after flowering.


Thanks for the suggestions.

Space (or lack of it) precludes the first suggestion.

A lowish fruit cage (there are redcurrants with the loganberries
precludes the second.

Sorry!

Any thoughts on eliminating all but a few of the new shhots as a way of
keeping things a bit clear?

Roger T- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -


The less shoots you have the less fruit you'll have next year.
Aa I dont know how you train your plant it is hard to advise you, but
if you use wires or canes then try to keep the new growth on the
lowest one.
David Hill


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