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Old 14-03-2017, 10:39 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default What is the best tool to cut this down

I have a neighbour that I'd like to cut his tree down for him, but have
no garden tools myself once i have spoken to him and got his permission
what tool/tools would be best to hire/buy for the job?
I don't mind buying some tools like a saw as i would be able to use that
again myself indoors but any gardening tools over 20 i think i'd rather
hire, i do have ladders that go up about 6 foot but wonder what your
thoughts are.
The tree in question is below:
http://i1376.photobucket.com/albums/...psxr3jwxri.jpg
http://i1376.photobucket.com/albums/...pstaiajdgl.jpg
http://i1376.photobucket.com/albums/...pspi5n41xe.jpg


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Old 14-03-2017, 11:18 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default What is the best tool to cut this down

On Tue, 14 Mar 2017 22:39:56 +0000, Jim
wrote:

I have a neighbour that I'd like to cut his tree down for him, but have
no garden tools myself once i have spoken to him and got his permission
what tool/tools would be best to hire/buy for the job?


http://i1376.photobucket.com/albums/...psxr3jwxri.jpg
http://i1376.photobucket.com/albums/...pstaiajdgl.jpg
http://i1376.photobucket.com/albums/...pspi5n41xe.jpg


Get a tree surgeon in, you don't have a lot of room there. Don't wish
to appear too rude but if you have to ask what you need it suggests
that you aren't experienced in cutting down trees. It may only be a
small tree but there is still a lot of weight in those branches to do
damage.
First timers may be able to fell such a tree if there is space for it
to fall clear into an open space such as a field and then thin down
the branches but you don't appear to have that space. the limbs will
be safer removed before the trunk and that needs agility a knowledge
of ropes to lower them and an appreciation of how uneven weight
distribution of a branch will affect the way it swings after being
cut.
It doesn't look like the land in the photos is owned by you or your
neighbour, do have public liability insurance ?

There is something strange about your request anyway if you haven't
yet asked his permission, it looks like you have promised to sell
someone some wood for their stove because tarmacing drives has gone
slack.
Apologies if I've been too rude.
G.Harman
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Old 15-03-2017, 12:59 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default What is the best tool to cut this down

On 14/03/2017 23:18, wrote:
On Tue, 14 Mar 2017 22:39:56 +0000, Jim
wrote:

I have a neighbour that I'd like to cut his tree down for him, but have
no garden tools myself once i have spoken to him and got his permission
what tool/tools would be best to hire/buy for the job?


http://i1376.photobucket.com/albums/...psxr3jwxri.jpg
http://i1376.photobucket.com/albums/...pstaiajdgl.jpg
http://i1376.photobucket.com/albums/...pspi5n41xe.jpg


Get a tree surgeon in, you don't have a lot of room there. Don't wish
to appear too rude but if you have to ask what you need it suggests
that you aren't experienced in cutting down trees. It may only be a
small tree but there is still a lot of weight in those branches to do
damage.
First timers may be able to fell such a tree if there is space for it
to fall clear into an open space such as a field and then thin down
the branches but you don't appear to have that space. the limbs will
be safer removed before the trunk and that needs agility a knowledge
of ropes to lower them and an appreciation of how uneven weight
distribution of a branch will affect the way it swings after being
cut.
It doesn't look like the land in the photos is owned by you or your
neighbour, do have public liability insurance ?

There is something strange about your request anyway if you haven't
yet asked his permission, it looks like you have promised to sell
someone some wood for their stove because tarmacing drives has gone
slack.
Apologies if I've been too rude.
G.Harman


Apologies accepted, I do find it a wee bit offensive re the tarmacking dig.
There is nothing underhand going on, it's a pain for him as well as me
and was going to do him a favor (and myself), public liability insurance
you must be joking.
Tree surgeon is a joke i'm not made of money, my plan was to tackle it a
bit at a time, not chop it from the bottom, you are right i know nothing
about this kind of thing which is why i came here, sure if i had the
funds i'd go pro route but that is out of the question.
I do have access to his back garden, and will have 3 car parking spaces
at least to play with so room is not an issue.

Oh and i have not asked his permission yet as i wanted to make sure i
could get it done before i spoke to him, not everyone is out to screw
people, best you don't judge me by your own standards.

Jim
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Old 15-03-2017, 07:56 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default What is the best tool to cut this down

Jim wrote:

I have a neighbour that I'd like to cut his tree down for him, but have
no garden tools myself once i have spoken to him and got his permission
what tool/tools would be best to hire/buy for the job?


If I was doing it, I would first gradually work away at the
smaller branches, from the safety of the ground, using my
telescopic pruner:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/...?ie=UTF8&psc=1

There are plenty of designs about, here is a much cheaper one

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/2-6Telescopic-Extendable-High-Quality-Reach-Garden-Tree-Branch-Pruner-Cut-Lopper-/122367308938

If you can reach, you might alternatively be able to do it with a
pair of loppers:

http://www.toolstation.com/shop/Landscaping/d130/Secateurs%2C+Loppers+%26+Pruners/sd3181/Spear+%26+Jackson+Telescopic+Bypass+Lopper/p93471

Then I would work on the larger branches with a bow saw, taking
care not to cut off a section so heavy that I could not control
it when it fell

http://www.toolstation.com/shop/Landscaping/d130/Garden+Saws/sd3265/Bow+Saw/p41388

I guess you are wanting to remove the tree completely. If so,
leave at least a metre of trunk, so that you have leverage as you
dig and chop (using implements of your choice) around the roots
and try to get it free.

Eye protection is worth wearing.

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham UK


Plant amazing Acers.
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Old 15-03-2017, 08:36 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default What is the best tool to cut this down

On Tue, 14 Mar 2017 22:39:56 +0000, Jim
wrote:

I have a neighbour that I'd like to cut his tree down for him, but have
no garden tools myself once i have spoken to him and got his permission
what tool/tools would be best to hire/buy for the job?


Bow Saw, take off what you can, a little at a time, and then stop if
you feel it is getting beyond you.


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Old 15-03-2017, 09:07 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default What is the best tool to cut this down

On Wed, 15 Mar 2017 00:59:54 +0000, Jim
wrote:

On 14/03/2017 23:18, wrote:
On Tue, 14 Mar 2017 22:39:56 +0000, Jim
wrote:

I have a neighbour that I'd like to cut his tree down for him, but have
no garden tools myself once i have spoken to him and got his permission
what tool/tools would be best to hire/buy for the job?


Get a tree surgeon in, you don't have a lot of room there
First timers may be able to fell such a tree if there is space for it
to fall clear into an open space such as a field and then thin down
the branches but you don't appear to have that space. the limbs will
be safer removed before the trunk and that needs agility
There is something strange about your request anyway if you haven't
yet asked his permission,
Apologies if I've been too rude.
G.Harman


Apologies accepted, I do find it a wee bit offensive re the tarmacking dig.
There is nothing underhand going on, it's a pain for him as well as me
and was going to do him a favor (and myself), public liability insurance
you must be joking.
Tree surgeon is a joke i'm not made of money, my plan was to tackle it a
bit at a time, not chop it from the bottom,


Fair comment, I was a little harsh.
You can get a reasonable quality bow saw from screwfix for around
10,they had one shown up in their promotional email yesterday.
That isn't too much of an investment to experiment with and see if
you have the agility and stamina to climb the tree bearing in mind we
don't know if you are a fit twenty something who will bounce or an
older person who isn't so supple.
A bow saw is far more controllable than any power tool while clinging
on and if it goes pear shaped won't have the risks of a something like
a small chainsaw which can injure in a millisecond.
You are going to have to climb quite high to start sawing of those
limbs , perhaps have a dummy run first to see if you are happy with
that. Many people underestimate how high a tree is , compare it with
the building and consider if you would be happy balancing on a ledge
of similar height. And while those branches look thin and spindly it
is surprising how the weight adds up.

So if you are up for it climb the tree with bow saw and carefully saw
the off limbs of first a pruner that can cut through the smaller up to
1" thick stuff will be useful as well. , The bow saw will let the
process happen slow enough that the branch end lowers slowly to the
ground before you finally cut it all the way through giving a degree
of control. Try and remove them from opposite sides as you go so the
tree remains balanced in case you have to give up or do the job over a
period of time.
Don't underestimate the amount of material you are going to end up
with to get rid of and will need to work around on the ground.

Still risky because of the proximity to the car parking area which
presumably cannot be closed off to everybody, you only need a bit of
branch to bounce onto someone's car and they may want recompense
which may not actually be realistic for the damage caused.

G.Harman
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Old 15-03-2017, 09:48 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default What is the best tool to cut this down

On 15/03/2017 00:59, Jim wrote:
On 14/03/2017 23:18, wrote:
On Tue, 14 Mar 2017 22:39:56 +0000, Jim
wrote:

I have a neighbour that I'd like to cut his tree down for him, but have
no garden tools myself once i have spoken to him and got his permission
what tool/tools would be best to hire/buy for the job?


http://i1376.photobucket.com/albums/...psxr3jwxri.jpg

http://i1376.photobucket.com/albums/...pstaiajdgl.jpg

http://i1376.photobucket.com/albums/...pspi5n41xe.jpg


Get a tree surgeon in, you don't have a lot of room there. Don't wish
to appear too rude but if you have to ask what you need it suggests
that you aren't experienced in cutting down trees. It may only be a
small tree but there is still a lot of weight in those branches to do
damage.


+1

First timers may be able to fell such a tree if there is space for it
to fall clear into an open space such as a field and then thin down
the branches but you don't appear to have that space. the limbs will
be safer removed before the trunk and that needs agility a knowledge
of ropes to lower them and an appreciation of how uneven weight
distribution of a branch will affect the way it swings after being
cut.


+2

I saw some cowboys cut down or rather try to since they gave up after a
while a largish messy sycamore tree in my parents neighbours garden. It
made fascinating watching with one guy high in the tree randomly cutting
off bits that fell on the other and at one point cartoon style sat on
the branch he was sawing through. Even sat on the right side the recoil
of the bow as the large heavy piece fell off was impressive and nearly
caused him to fall. The guy on the ground had no idea how heavy it would
be and just let go of the rope - big bang and no garden shed. It was
very Laurel and Hardy. Dumb as rocks!

It doesn't look like the land in the photos is owned by you or your
neighbour, do have public liability insurance ?


It is a risk when felling trees.

Tree surgeon is a joke i'm not made of money, my plan was to tackle it a
bit at a time, not chop it from the bottom, you are right i know nothing
about this kind of thing which is why i came here, sure if i had the
funds i'd go pro route but that is out of the question.
I do have access to his back garden, and will have 3 car parking spaces
at least to play with so room is not an issue.


I think you will find that room is an issue when you start cutting it
down it will fill a lot of space. If I was going to do it I'd wear my
hard hat and use a pair of heavy duty bypass loppers to take off all the
thin growth to about 1" diameter and get rid of that. Then use a pruning
saw or bow saw and rope supports to cut off the limbs off in manageable
chunks. It will be hard work by hand. More than you think.

But don't be tempted to attack it with a chainsaw unless you want to be
entered for this years Darwin awards.

You haven't got long to do it now before it is out of bounds on the
grounds of nesting birds. In fact you may well already be out of time
with it already in leaf so it will be a job for next year.

Oh and i have not asked his permission yet as i wanted to make sure i
could get it done before i spoke to him, not everyone is out to screw
people, best you don't judge me by your own standards.

Jim


Does he want it taken down or do you?

--
Regards,
Martin Brown
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Old 15-03-2017, 10:02 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default What is the best tool to cut this down

On 14/03/2017 22:39, Jim wrote:
I have a neighbour that I'd like to cut his tree down for him, but have
no garden tools myself once i have spoken to him and got his permission
what tool/tools would be best to hire/buy for the job?
I don't mind buying some tools like a saw as i would be able to use that
again myself indoors but any gardening tools over 20 i think i'd rather
hire, i do have ladders that go up about 6 foot but wonder what your
thoughts are.
The tree in question is below:
http://i1376.photobucket.com/albums/...psxr3jwxri.jpg

http://i1376.photobucket.com/albums/...pstaiajdgl.jpg

http://i1376.photobucket.com/albums/...pspi5n41xe.jpg


I would highly recommend you buy or hire a telescopic pole pruning saw
first of all.I have one I bought for around a tenner from Lidl several
years ago. You would be surprised how much you can cut down with one. Be
prepared for a lot of branches to dispose of. And of course wear goggles.

Mike
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Old 15-03-2017, 10:51 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default What is the best tool to cut this down

Martin Brown wrote:

I saw some cowboys cut down or rather try to since they gave up after a
while a largish messy sycamore tree in my parents neighbours garden. It
made fascinating watching with one guy high in the tree randomly cutting
off bits that fell on the other and at one point cartoon style sat on
the branch he was sawing through.


A neighbour of mine, after having been ripped off by itinerants
(they had invented a story that there had been complaints, and he
had to let them do the work) who left him with unbelievably
mangled eyesores of trees, plus all the trimmings for him to
dispose of, apparently went with a garden landscape firm to clear
the lot, and give the plot a bit of a makeover.

They had the remains of a reasonably large conifer to bring down,
without room to drop it in one. I saw no goggles, ear defenders,
or safety clothing in evidence whilst using a chain saw. An
extended sectional ladder rested against the tree, but wasn't
secured to it. There was some form of primitive personal safety
loop, but it was only clipped to the ladder, the top rung of
which rested insecurely against the curve of the trunk.

As they worked down from the top, the chain saw was deployed at
about head height but, having no goggles, the operator was
showered with sawdust and had to look away from the cut.
Meanwhile the second man had to leave his position footing the
ladder to heave on the rope hoping (but not succeeding) to
persuade the section to fall the right way.

To my surprise they survived, but that is simply not the way to
do it. At almost every stage they progressed in such a tentative
way, that it seemed to me that they were way out of their depth.

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham UK


Plant amazing Acers.
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Old 15-03-2017, 10:56 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default What is the best tool to cut this down

In article , damduck-
says...
You are going to have to climb quite high to start sawing of those
limbs ,


NO. Never start high.

Have you looked at the tree? It's small, dense, the branches are
skinny and arched. Arched branches under stress, can easily sever at the
trunk. Cutting the tree you're standing in is a dangerous mistake for
beginners.


So if you are up for it climb the tree with bow saw



Ignore this bad advice. Do NOT climb the tree holding or using sharp
tools. On that tree you should be able to do the whole job safely from
ground level, starting with the lower branches first, and working from
the outside towards the trunk as Chris said. Aim for debris to drop
onto clear ground.

Before you start, clear any trip hazards from under the tree (old
bricks, slippy moss/ leaves). As you cut, keep clearing the cut stuff
out of the work zone; it's easy to trip or step back on debris when your
attention is upward. Stumbling/falling while holding a sharp/pointy tool
a common cause of garden injury.

Starting on lower branches, aim to clear a head-height working space
all round the trunk leaving the upper branches till last, when you have
better access to them.

Higher up, you may not be able to reach the outer ends of top
branches to reduce them, so will have to saw off a whole branch close
to the trunk. Before the saw goes right through , as the cut opens the
branch will begin to sag, and it's helpful to have someone else on hand
to guide it safely down as you finish the cut.

I agree with leaving a metre stump; rocking it makes severing the
roots much easier if you want to do a neat job.

If you just cut the stump off at ground level, it may sprout new growth
again; but removing them regularly will eventually starve the root to
death. Or, you can poison the stump while it's raw.

However much waste debris you anticipate, these jobs always end up
with far more. Disposing of it can be more of a headache than taking the
tree down; especially to your neighbour who owns it; so have a plan in
advance, one that doesn't block anyone's car access.

Janet




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Old 15-03-2017, 11:23 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default What is the best tool to cut this down

In article ,
Janet wrote:

So if you are up for it climb the tree with bow saw


Ignore this bad advice. Do NOT climb the tree holding or using sharp
tools. On that tree you should be able to do the whole job safely from
ground level, starting with the lower branches first, and working from
the outside towards the trunk as Chris said. Aim for debris to drop
onto clear ground.


And, if you can't, an INDUSTRIAL step ladder or small scaffolding
tower is essential. Unless you really know what you are doing,
using a plain ladder is a Really Bad Idea - there are more things
that can go wrong than tyres can imagine. Most domestic step
ladders are ricketty and have too small a base.


Regards,
Nick Maclaren.
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Old 15-03-2017, 11:52 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default What is the best tool to cut this down

On 15/03/2017 10:51, Chris J Dixon wrote:
Martin Brown wrote:

I saw some cowboys cut down or rather try to since they gave up after a
while a largish messy sycamore tree in my parents neighbours garden. It
made fascinating watching with one guy high in the tree randomly cutting
off bits that fell on the other and at one point cartoon style sat on
the branch he was sawing through.


As they worked down from the top, the chain saw was deployed at
about head height but, having no goggles, the operator was
showered with sawdust and had to look away from the cut.
Meanwhile the second man had to leave his position footing the
ladder to heave on the rope hoping (but not succeeding) to
persuade the section to fall the right way.


Chainsaws are scary at the best of times but up at height and without
PPE is a Darwin award just waiting to happen...

To my surprise they survived, but that is simply not the way to
do it. At almost every stage they progressed in such a tentative
way, that it seemed to me that they were way out of their depth.


The best team I ever saw did a line of overgrown cherry trees in another
neighbour's garden. They were 50' tall after decades unchecked growth.
Tree surgeon advised taking 50% off but owner insisted on 30%.

Team of three, one a nimble climber with a chainsaw and tied into the
strongest high branch another with a rope to control descent and a boss
man who looked at the tree from a distance and told the guy with the
chainsaw what and where to cut. They were truly professional about it
and did a really nice job leaving perfectly balanced trees afterwards.
Predictably the trees responded with immediate rapid regrowth so the
surgeons were right about taking them down to half size.

--
Regards,
Martin Brown
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Old 15-03-2017, 03:20 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default What is the best tool to cut this down

In article ,
says...

On 15/03/2017 10:51, Chris J Dixon wrote:
Martin Brown wrote:

I saw some cowboys cut down or rather try to since they gave up after a
while a largish messy sycamore tree in my parents neighbours garden. It
made fascinating watching with one guy high in the tree randomly cutting
off bits that fell on the other and at one point cartoon style sat on
the branch he was sawing through.


As they worked down from the top, the chain saw was deployed at
about head height but, having no goggles, the operator was
showered with sawdust and had to look away from the cut.
Meanwhile the second man had to leave his position footing the
ladder to heave on the rope hoping (but not succeeding) to
persuade the section to fall the right way.


Chainsaws are scary at the best of times but up at height and without
PPE is a Darwin award just waiting to happen...


I think that any trees that would need the attention of a chainsaw at
any height are best left to the professionals.
It is worthwhile googling chain saw accidents.


To my surprise they survived, but that is simply not the way to
do it. At almost every stage they progressed in such a tentative
way, that it seemed to me that they were way out of their depth.


The best team I ever saw did a line of overgrown cherry trees in another
neighbour's garden. They were 50' tall after decades unchecked growth.
Tree surgeon advised taking 50% off but owner insisted on 30%.

Team of three, one a nimble climber with a chainsaw and tied into the
strongest high branch another with a rope to control descent and a boss
man who looked at the tree from a distance and told the guy with the
chainsaw what and where to cut. They were truly professional about it
and did a really nice job leaving perfectly balanced trees afterwards.
Predictably the trees responded with immediate rapid regrowth so the
surgeons were right about taking them down to half size.




---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus

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Default What is the best tool to cut this down

On 15/03/2017 09:48, Martin Brown wrote:
Does he want it taken down or do you?

To be honest both of us want it gone, he can't be arsed to do it.
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Default What is the best tool to cut this down

On 15/03/2017 10:02, Muddymike wrote:
On 14/03/2017 22:39, Jim wrote:
I have a neighbour that I'd like to cut his tree down for him, but have
no garden tools myself once i have spoken to him and got his permission
what tool/tools would be best to hire/buy for the job?
I don't mind buying some tools like a saw as i would be able to use that
again myself indoors but any gardening tools over 20 i think i'd rather
hire, i do have ladders that go up about 6 foot but wonder what your
thoughts are.
The tree in question is below:
http://i1376.photobucket.com/albums/...psxr3jwxri.jpg


http://i1376.photobucket.com/albums/...pstaiajdgl.jpg


http://i1376.photobucket.com/albums/...pspi5n41xe.jpg



I would highly recommend you buy or hire a telescopic pole pruning saw
first of all.I have one I bought for around a tenner from Lidl several
years ago. You would be surprised how much you can cut down with one. Be
prepared for a lot of branches to dispose of. And of course wear goggles.

Mike

OK thanks for everyones replies, i do have my own hard hat and goggles
and would be using them, as for my health well 50 and not the fittest
guy in the world, as have seen too many "You've been framed moments" of
people up ladders doing this and screwing it up and putting themselves
in hospital so hopefully i work on the side of caution rather then gun
ho attitute.
My plan is to tackle is little bit at a time, not just go in and hack
the main branches off, I know the car park well and there are very few
cars here during the day so room is not an issue for bits falling into
car park side, neighbours garden is empty bar a kids bike which i would
move to far side of garden, as for the rubbish this is an issue, as we
no longer get garden waste picked up by council for free, but i have
spoken to them and offer a service where you pay 16 and you gt 10 pick
ups of larger items (beds etc) but this also includes garden waste so
ring and book a pick up day so i will pay for that, rather then pay
someone else to dump it in country lane.
I will NOT be climbing the tree that is for sure.
I was looking at hiring (or even buying then selling on) something like this
http://www.argos.co.uk/product/3595330
or
http://www.argos.co.uk/product/6347231

i wanted to stay with electric and away from petrol, the beauty of this
(IMHO) is i can pick away at the tree bit by bit, i was thinking i'd
loose about 30% when selling on which is fine by me.

Jim


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