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Old 17-05-2019, 09:19 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Hi, newbie here.

My Viburnum Eskimo has been attacked by Viburnum Leaf Caterpillars.

Can anyone suggest a way of eradicating them without the use of pesticides?

Would it be prudent to lop off all the branches and burn them? The
caterpillars are still on the leaves but there's hardly any leaves left
now without holes.

Poor Viburnum looks very sorry for itself, this happened so quickly.
--
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Old 17-05-2019, 09:39 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Hi, newbie here.

On Fri, 17 May 2019 09:19:28 +0100, Primrose wrote:

My Viburnum Eskimo has been attacked by Viburnum Leaf Caterpillars.

Can anyone suggest a way of eradicating them without the use of pesticides?

Would it be prudent to lop off all the branches and burn them? The
caterpillars are still on the leaves but there's hardly any leaves left
now without holes.

Poor Viburnum looks very sorry for itself, this happened so quickly.


Cutting off the branches would be the last thing I'd do, if at all.

You could try spraying them with water containing a squirt of
washing-up detergent (i.e. washing-up-water strength) and a few drops
of methylated spirit. It should enable water to get into their
breathing tubes (spiracles) so that they drown.

Or you could resort to finger-and-thumb, and just go over the whole
shrub slowly and carefully squidging all the caterpillars that you can
find. Messy and smelly, and the RHS web site doesn't reckon that's
very practical, there being just too many caterpillars. OTOH the RHS
also says that although the damage looks awful, the shrub usually
survives.

https://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/profile?pid=556

--

Chris

Gardening in West Cornwall, looking E, Sheltered and partially shaded by trees to the W and SW
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Old 17-05-2019, 11:11 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Hi, newbie here.

On 17/05/2019 09:39, Chris Hogg wrote:
On Fri, 17 May 2019 09:19:28 +0100, Primrose wrote:

My Viburnum Eskimo has been attacked by Viburnum Leaf Caterpillars.

Can anyone suggest a way of eradicating them without the use of pesticides?

Would it be prudent to lop off all the branches and burn them? The
caterpillars are still on the leaves but there's hardly any leaves left
now without holes.

Poor Viburnum looks very sorry for itself, this happened so quickly.


Cutting off the branches would be the last thing I'd do, if at all.

You could try spraying them with water containing a squirt of
washing-up detergent (i.e. washing-up-water strength) and a few drops
of methylated spirit. It should enable water to get into their
breathing tubes (spiracles) so that they drown.

Or you could resort to finger-and-thumb, and just go over the whole
shrub slowly and carefully squidging all the caterpillars that you can
find. Messy and smelly, and the RHS web site doesn't reckon that's
very practical, there being just too many caterpillars. OTOH the RHS
also says that although the damage looks awful, the shrub usually
survives.

https://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/profile?pid=556

Many thanks for your reply, I think I'll try spraying.

--
I'm a sew and sow!

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Old 17-05-2019, 02:36 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Hi, newbie here.

On 17/05/19 11:11, Primrose wrote:
On 17/05/2019 09:39, Chris Hogg wrote:
On Fri, 17 May 2019 09:19:28 +0100, Primrose wrote:

My Viburnum Eskimo has been attacked by Viburnum Leaf Caterpillars.

Can anyone suggest a way of eradicating them without the use of pesticides?

Would it be prudent to lop off all the branches and burn them? The
caterpillars are still on the leaves but there's hardly any leaves left
now without holes.

Poor Viburnum looks very sorry for itself, this happened so quickly.


Cutting off the branches would be the last thing I'd do, if at all.

You could try spraying them with water containing a squirt of
washing-up detergent (i.e. washing-up-water strength) and a few drops
of methylated spirit. It should enable water to get into their
breathing tubes (spiracles) so that they drown.

Or you could resort to finger-and-thumb, and just go over the whole
shrub slowly and carefully squidging all the caterpillars that you can
find. Messy and smelly, and the RHS web site doesn't reckon that's
very practical, there being just too many caterpillars. OTOH the RHS
also says that although the damage looks awful, the shrub usually
survives.

https://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/profile?pid=556

Many thanks for your reply, I think I'll try spraying.


Unless the caterpillars eat wood as well as leaves, I wouldn't bother.
We have a Corylus contorta var. purpurea which was completely defoliated
by caterpillars last year, and in summer looked just like it does in
winter.

This year there have been no caterpillars at all, and the foliage and
catkins have been at their best.

--

Jeff
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Old 17-05-2019, 03:51 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Hi, newbie here.

On 17/05/2019 14:36, Jeff Layman wrote:
On 17/05/19 11:11, Primrose wrote:

snip

Cutting off the branches would be the last thing I'd do, if at all.

You could try spraying them with water containing a squirt of
washing-up detergent (i.e. washing-up-water strength) and a few drops
of methylated spirit. It should enable water to get into their
breathing tubes (spiracles) so that they drown.

Or you could resort to finger-and-thumb, and just go over the whole
shrub slowly and carefully squidging all the caterpillars that you can
find. Messy and smelly, and the RHS web site doesn't reckon that's
very practical, there being just too many caterpillars. OTOH the RHS
also says that although the damage looks awful, the shrub usually
survives.

https://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/profile?pid=556

Many thanks for your reply, I think I'll try spraying.


Unless the caterpillars eat wood as well as leaves, I wouldn't bother.
We have a Corylus contorta var. purpurea which was completely defoliated
by caterpillars last year, and in summer looked just like it does in
winter.

This year there have been no caterpillars at all, and the foliage and
catkins have been at their best.

I read that the caterpillars drop to the ground when they have finished
damaging the plant and come back the next year. I also saw something
about them emitting a foul smell. It is a bit stinky in the front
garden but we thought that it was foxes.

It is going to be a bit of a job spraying as the Viburnum is over 20ft
high but perhaps it's time to give it a lopping any way.

Thanks for your reply.

--
I'm a sew and sow!



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Old 17-05-2019, 04:36 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Hi, newbie here.

On Fri, 17 May 2019 15:51:26 +0100, Primrose wrote:


It is going to be a bit of a job spraying as the Viburnum is over 20ft
high but perhaps it's time to give it a lopping any way.


LOL! Now she tells us! :-)

I looked up Viburnum Eskimo and most sites said it was small and
compact, reaching 1 - 1.5 metres after 10 years. Either yours is
_very_ old, or it's not Eskimo!

--

Chris

Gardening in West Cornwall, looking E, Sheltered and partially shaded by trees to the W and SW
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Old 18-05-2019, 09:04 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Hi, newbie here.

On 17/05/2019 16:36, Chris Hogg wrote:
On Fri, 17 May 2019 15:51:26 +0100, Primrose wrote:


It is going to be a bit of a job spraying as the Viburnum is over 20ft
high but perhaps it's time to give it a lopping any way.


LOL! Now she tells us! :-)

I looked up Viburnum Eskimo and most sites said it was small and
compact, reaching 1 - 1.5 metres after 10 years. Either yours is
_very_ old, or it's not Eskimo!



It is going to be a bit of a job spraying as the Viburnum is over 20ft
high but perhaps it's time to give it a lopping any way.


LOL! Now she tells us!

I looked up Viburnum Eskimo and most sites said it was small and
compact, reaching 1 - 1.5 metres after 10 years. Either yours is
_very_ old, or it's not Eskimo!

When I bought it about ten years ago it did say just that, a compact
shrub. It was about 18inches in height when I planted it. It is
definitely Eskimo, it produces white clusters of flowers.

I must admit I did rather let it go a bit but quite liked the height.

Funnily enough all the shrubs I planted at the time have grown a lot
larger than I expected seeing as they were supposed to be "dwarf"
shrubs.;-)

--
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Old 18-05-2019, 09:28 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Hi, newbie here.

On 18/05/19 09:04, Primrose wrote:
On 17/05/2019 16:36, Chris Hogg wrote:


Funnily enough all the shrubs I planted at the time have grown a lot
larger than I expected seeing as they were supposed to be "dwarf"
shrubs.;-)


I've long considered the descriptions on plant labels of "ultimate size"
or "size at 5/10 years" to be taken with a very large pinch of salt!

--

Jeff
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Old 18-05-2019, 11:50 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Hi, newbie here.

On 18/05/2019 09:28, Jeff Layman wrote:
On 18/05/19 09:04, Primrose wrote:
On 17/05/2019 16:36, Chris Hogg wrote:


Funnily enough all the shrubs I planted at the time have grown a lot
larger than I expected seeing as they were supposed to be "dwarf"
shrubs.;-)


I've long considered the descriptions on plant labels of "ultimate size"
or "size at 5/10 years" to be taken with a very large pinch of salt!

I remember reading a catalogue description for a Silver Birch "An
elegant tree to 10 ft"
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Old 18-05-2019, 12:46 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Hi, newbie here.

On Sat, 18 May 2019 11:50:02 +0100, David Hill
wrote:

I remember reading a catalogue description for a Silver Birch "An
elegant tree to 10 ft"


And in very very fine print: "Considerably less elegant therafter."


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Old 18-05-2019, 02:42 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Hi, newbie here.

On 18/05/2019 12:46, R. Daneel Olivaw wrote:
On Sat, 18 May 2019 11:50:02 +0100, David Hill
wrote:

I remember reading a catalogue description for a Silver Birch "An
elegant tree to 10 ft"


And in very very fine print: "Considerably less elegant therafter."


And there was I thinking that Betula pendula didn't become elegant until
it reached 20 or 30 feet.

--
SRH
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Old 18-05-2019, 04:10 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Hi, newbie here.

In article ,
Stewart Robert Hinsley wrote:
On 18/05/2019 12:46, R. Daneel Olivaw wrote:
On Sat, 18 May 2019 11:50:02 +0100, David Hill
wrote:

I remember reading a catalogue description for a Silver Birch "An
elegant tree to 10 ft"


And in very very fine print: "Considerably less elegant therafter."


And there was I thinking that Betula pendula didn't become elegant until
it reached 20 or 30 feet.


Quite! It remains elegant until its full height (50' or so), and
probably until its maximum of over 100' - unless it is topped, as
so many people who plant it in suburban gardens do :-(

We have several near here of 50' - they are a right pain, because
they create massive amounts of debris twice a year that blows into
everything (including out roofspace). But they are elegant.

That being said, I have some Corylus maxima of 35', which even CTW
and Bean don't think is normal.


Regards,
Nick Maclaren.
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Old 18-05-2019, 08:38 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Hi, newbie here.

On 18/05/2019 14:42, Stewart Robert Hinsley wrote:
On 18/05/2019 12:46, R. Daneel Olivaw wrote:
On Sat, 18 May 2019 11:50:02 +0100, David Hill
wrote:

I remember reading a catalogue description for a Silver Birch "An
elegant tree to 10 ft"


And in very very fine print: "Considerably less elegant therafter."


And there was I thinking that Betula pendula didn't become elegant until
it reached 20 or 30 feet.

Bristol Zoo used to have a realy magnificant weeping silver birch at
least 40ft tall and probably 50+ years old, but not there last time I went.


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