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Old 20-07-2010, 04:40 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Default USDA Admits Link Between Antibiotic Use by Big Ag and Human Health

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/andrew...ics_b_649673.h
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Andrew Gunther
Program Director, Animal Welfare Approved
Posted: July 20, 2010 07:30 AM

USDA Admits Link Between Antibiotic Use by Big Ag and Human Health




At a hearing of a House Energy and Commerce subcommittee on Wednesday,
July 14, 2010, a representative of the United States Department of
Agriculture (USDA) finally caught up with the rest of the world -- and
his peers at the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and Center for
Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) -- and admitted that the use of
antibiotics in farm animal feed is contributing to the growing problem
of deadly antibiotic resistance in America.
Dr. John Clifford, Deputy Administrator for Veterinary Services for the
USDA's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) read from his
previously submitted testimony that the USDA believes it is likely that
U.S. use of antibiotics in animal agriculture does lead to some cases of
resistance in humans and the animals.
Why is this news? Because the USDA has been continually playing the
Three Wise Monkeys game -- it sees no evil, hears no evil and speaks no
evil -- when it comes to deadly consequences to humans of the
non-therapeutic use of antibiotics in farm animals. In fact, Dr.
Clifford looked as if he'd been given a choice between testifying or
having his eye poked out with a stick and he lost the toss.
Others, though, readily stepped up to the plate. Despite the feeble
nature of the recent FDA Guidance to Industry on farm animal antibiotics
(read more about this in our blog), Dr. Joshua Sharfstein, Principle
Deputy Commissioner of the FDA, was clear in his testimony that the
overall weight of evidence supports the conclusion that using
antibiotics for production purposes in livestock farming (as growth
promoters and to prevent rather than treat illness) is not in the
interest of protecting and promoting public health.
Dr. Sharfstein also turned away a challenge from Representative John
Shimkus (R-IL 19) about the soundness of the science upon which his
findings rest. Mr. Shimkus, obviously unhappy with Dr. Sharfstein's
testimony, badgered him to come up with up a U.S. peer-reviewed study
(which Dr. Sharfstein did -- a 2003 Institute of Medicine study) and
then questioned the veracity of the findings. Dr. Sharfstein assured Mr.
Shimkus that the Institute has a peer-review process in place and
reminded him that "the Institute is considered our nation's leading
scientific expert ... "
Dr. Ali Khan, Assistant Surgeon General and the Deputy Director of the
National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID),
Center for Disease Control and Prevention, testified that there is
unequivocal and compelling evidence that the use of antibiotics in farm
animals leads to drug resistance that has an adverse impact on public
health. He also faced questions from a visibly agitated Mr. Shimkus, who
kept dismissing studies by the World Health Organization and others to
request "real science," which, from his posturing, is evidently only
that which supports Big Ag.
Mr. Shimkus played his role as Big Ag's Mouthpiece admirably. He
questioned every statistic, slide, study, expert, institution, report or
person cited that didn't agree with an antibiotic free-for-all in the
farmyard. "So far there's nothing that links use in animals to a buildup
of resistance in humans," he stated, recklessly ignoring all published
science since 1968 and the testimony of the doctors his government has
charged with protecting health, while making sure he gave Big Ag a
clear, concise statement around which it can issue an indignant press
release.
So let's recap -- the USDA, however grudgingly, is finally admitting the
link between the use of subtherapeutic antibiotics in farm animal feed
and human drug resistance; the FDA is impressed enough with the "weight
of the evidence" to begin calling for changes in how antibiotics are
used in farm animal production; and the CDC feels the evidence is
"unequivocal and compelling," yet there are still those calling for
"real science?"
Well how about the March 22, 2010, report from the Duke Infection
Control Outreach Network that a superbug call C. difficile is multi-drug
resistant and on the rise? Is that real science or should we conduct
more studies and perhaps hold a few more hearings?
We don't need more hearings, we need action. H.R. 1549, Preservation of
Antibiotics for Medical Treatment Act, continues to languish in
committee while a few elected officials spend the taxpayer's time and
money to pretend the science they are calling for doesn't already exist
in mountains.
In the coming days, I expect that Big Ag will marshal their forces and
come out with its own brand of science and experts to refute all
testimony that threatens its profit margin. Of course, what I'm really
waiting for is the day the Subcommittee calls on one of the dozens and
dozens of AWA farmers to relate how changing from confined to
pasture-based farming has eliminated the need for subtherapuetic and
most therapeutic antibiotics because their animals and their farms are
safe and healthy to begin with.

--
Bill S. Jersey USA zone 5 shade garden
What use one more wake up call?

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Old 20-07-2010, 06:02 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Default USDA Admits Link Between Antibiotic Use by Big Ag and Human Health

In article ,
Bill who putters wrote:

In the coming days, I expect that Big Ag will marshal their forces and
come out with its own brand of science and experts to refute all
testimony that threatens its profit margin. Of course, what I'm really
waiting for is the day the Subcommittee calls on one of the dozens and
dozens of AWA farmers to relate how changing from confined to
pasture-based farming has eliminated the need for subtherapuetic and
most therapeutic antibiotics because their animals and their farms are
safe and healthy to begin with.


Not to mention that beef evolved to eat grass, not US tax-payer
subsidized corn, that gives them ulcers.

The Omnivore's Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals by Michael Pollan
http://www.amazon.com/Omnivores-Dile...ls/dp/01430385
83/ref=pd_bbs_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1206815576&sr=1-1
p. 126

""Grass," so understood, is the foundation of the intricate food chain
Salatin has assembled at Polyface, where a half dozen different animal
species are raised together in an intensive rotational dance on the
theme of symbiosis. (Joel) Salatin is the choreographer and the grasses
are his verdurous stage; the dance has made Polyface one of the most
productive and influential alternative farms in America.

Though it was only the third week of June, the pasture beneath me had
already seen several rotational turns. Before being cut earlier in the
week for the hay that would feed the farm's animals through the winter,
it had been grazed twice by beef cattle, which after each day-long stay
had been succeeded by several hundred laying hens. They'd arrived by
Eggmobile, a ramshackle portable henhouse designed and built by Salatin.
Why chickens? "Because that's how it works in nature," Salatin
explained. "Birds follow and clean up after herbivores." And so during
their turn in the pasture, the hens had performed several ecological
services for the cattle as well as the grass: They'd picked the tasty
grubs and fly larvae out of the cowpats, in the process spreading the
manure and eliminating parasites. (This is what Joel has in mind when he
says the animals do the work around here; the hens are his "sanitation
crew," the reason his cattle have no need of chemical parasiticides.)
And while they were at it, nibbling on the short cattle-clipped grasses
they like best, the chickens applied a few thousand pounds of nitrogen
to the pasture‹and produced several thousand uncommonly rich and tasty
eggs. After a few week's rest, the pasture will be grazed again, each
steer turning these lush grasses into beef at the rate of two or three
pounds a day.

By the end of the season Salatin's grasses will have been transformed by
his animals into some 40,000 pounds of beef, 30,000 pounds of pork,
10,000 broilers, 1,200 turkeys, 1,000 rabbits, and 35,000 dozen eggs.
This is an astounding cornucopia of food to draw from a hundred acres of
pasture, yet what is perhaps still more astonishing is the fact that
this pasture will be in no way diminished by the process‹in fact, it
will be the better for it, lusher, more fertile, even springier
underfoot (this thanks to the increased earthworm traffic). Salatin's
audacious bet is that feeding ourselves from nature need not be a
zero-sum proposition, one in which if there is more for us at the end of
the season then there must be less for nature‹less topsoil, less
fertility, less life. He's betting, in other words, on a very different
proposition, one that looks an awful lot like the proverbially
unattainable free lunch.

And none of it happens without the grass. In fact, the first time I met
Salatin he'd insisted that even before I-met any of his animals, I get
down on my belly in this very pasture to make the acquaintance of the
less charismatic species his farm was nurturing that, in turn, were
nurturing his farm. Taking the ant's-eye view, he ticked off the census
of a single square foot of pastu orchard grass, foxtail, a couple of
different fescues, bluegrass, and timothy. Then he cataloged the
legumes‹red clover and white, plus lupines‹and finally the forbs,
broad-leaved species like plantain, dandelion, and Queen Anne's Lace.
And those were just the plants, the species occupying the surface along
with a handful of itinerant insects; below decks and out of sight
tunneled earthworms (knowable by their castled mounds of rich castings),
pocket gophers, woodchucks, and burrowing insects, all making their dim
way through an unseen wilderness of bacteria, phages, eelish nematodes,
shrimpy rotifers, and miles upon miles of mycelium, the underground
filaments of fungi. We think of the grasses as the basis of this food
chain, yet behind, or beneath, the grassland stands the soil, that
inconceivably complex community of the living and the dead. Because a
healthy soil digests the dead to nourish the living, Salatin calls it
the earth's stomach.

But it is upon the grass, mediator of soil and sun, that the human gaze
has always tended to settle, and not just our gaze, either. A great many
animals, too, are drawn to grass, which partly accounts for our own deep
attraction to it: We come here to eat the animals that ate the grass
that we (lacking rumens) can't eat ourselves. "All flesh is grass." The
Old Testament's earthy equation reflects a pastoral culture's
appreciation of the food chain that sustained it, though the
hunter-gatherers living on the African savanna thousands of years
earlier would have understood the flesh-grass connection just as well.
It's only in our own time, after we began raising our food animals on
grain in Confined Animal Feeding Operations (following the dubious new
equation, All flesh is corn), that our ancient engagement with grass
could be overlooked. "
-----

No antibiotics creating resistant bacteria. No stinking lagoons of
excrement fouling the air, and contaminating ground water. No animal's
meat awash in endocrine hormones in response to being terrified and
brutalized. No need for fossil fuels for fertilizer or pesticides. No
need to create monocultures of feed for feed-lot animals, and their
concomitant destruction of the habitat, and the diversity of species
that live in them. We can stop the rape of nature, and we can create new
topsoil in the process.

Fossil fuel have done enough damage, and they need to be reduced, and
then terminated. They are no more sustainable than the fossil water that
we pump from ancient aquifers. If we had leaders, they would tell us so
and do the work that must be done for us to survive. Require reduction
of fossil fuel CO2 emissions. Require population controls. Require
lessening our dependence on grains, and encourage consumption of
vegetables.
--
- Billy
"Fascism should more properly be called corporatism because it is the
merger of state and corporate power." - Benito Mussolini.
http://www.democracynow.org/2010/7/2/maude
http://www.democracynow.org/2010/6/2...al_crime_scene
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Old 20-07-2010, 06:51 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Default USDA Admits Link Between Antibiotic Use by Big Ag and Human Health

In article
,
Billy wrote:


Fossil fuel have done enough damage, and they need to be reduced, and
then terminated. They are no more sustainable than the fossil water that
we pump from ancient aquifers. If we had leaders, they would tell us so
and do the work that must be done for us to survive. Require reduction
of fossil fuel CO2 emissions. Require population controls. Require
lessening our dependence on grains, and encourage consumption of
vegetables.


http://www.pregnantpause.org/numbers/fertility.htm#us

I have had 5 kids age 25 to 35 and no grand kids so far . My
generation 6 adults my brother and sister and Ingrids brother and
sister have had 12 kids. One died and one has had 2 children. We are
going extinct .

Movie

http://www.amazon.com/Idiocracy-Luke...ref=sr_1_1?s=d
vd&ie=UTF8&qid=1279644554&sr=1-1

--
Bill S. Jersey USA zone 5 shade garden
What use one more wake up call?

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Old 21-07-2010, 01:12 AM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Mar 2010
Posts: 2,438
Default USDA Admits Link Between Antibiotic Use by Big Ag and Human Health

In article ,
Bill who putters wrote:

In article
,
Billy wrote:


Fossil fuel have done enough damage, and they need to be reduced, and
then terminated. They are no more sustainable than the fossil water that
we pump from ancient aquifers. If we had leaders, they would tell us so
and do the work that must be done for us to survive. Require reduction
of fossil fuel CO2 emissions. Require population controls. Require
lessening our dependence on grains, and encourage consumption of
vegetables.


http://www.pregnantpause.org/numbers/fertility.htm#us

I have had 5 kids age 25 to 35 and no grand kids so far . My
generation 6 adults my brother and sister and Ingrids brother and
sister have had 12 kids. One died and one has had 2 children. We are
going extinct .

Movie

http://www.amazon.com/Idiocracy-Luke...ref=sr_1_1?s=d
vd&ie=UTF8&qid=1279644554&sr=1-1


Also available at better libraries near you.
--
- Billy
"Fascism should more properly be called corporatism because it is the
merger of state and corporate power." - Benito Mussolini.
http://www.democracynow.org/2010/7/2/maude
http://www.democracynow.org/2010/6/2...al_crime_scene
  #5   Report Post  
Old 21-07-2010, 06:25 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Posts: 30
Default USDA Admits Link Between Antibiotic Use by Big Ag and Human Health

On 07/20/10 7:12 PM, sometime in the recent past Billy posted this:
In ,
Bill who wrote:

In article
,
wrote:


Fossil fuel have done enough damage, and they need to be reduced, and
then terminated. They are no more sustainable than the fossil water that
we pump from ancient aquifers. If we had leaders, they would tell us so
and do the work that must be done for us to survive. Require reduction
of fossil fuel CO2 emissions. Require population controls. Require
lessening our dependence on grains, and encourage consumption of
vegetables.


http://www.pregnantpause.org/numbers/fertility.htm#us

I have had 5 kids age 25 to 35 and no grand kids so far . My
generation 6 adults my brother and sister and Ingrids brother and
sister have had 12 kids. One died and one has had 2 children. We are
going extinct .

Movie

http://www.amazon.com/Idiocracy-Luke...ref=sr_1_1?s=d
vd&ie=UTF8&qid=1279644554&sr=1-1


Also available at better libraries near you.

Billy, may I suggest http://bit.ly/ for shortening those long wrapping urls.
The last one you list requires extra cut & paste for me & I'm sure others.

--
Wilson 44.69, -67.3


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Old 21-07-2010, 10:39 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Mar 2010
Posts: 2,438
Default USDA Admits Link Between Antibiotic Use by Big Ag and Human Health

In article ,
Wilson wrote:

On 07/20/10 7:12 PM, sometime in the recent past Billy posted this:
In ,
Bill who wrote:

In article
,
wrote:


Fossil fuel have done enough damage, and they need to be reduced, and
then terminated. They are no more sustainable than the fossil water that
we pump from ancient aquifers. If we had leaders, they would tell us so
and do the work that must be done for us to survive. Require reduction
of fossil fuel CO2 emissions. Require population controls. Require
lessening our dependence on grains, and encourage consumption of
vegetables.

http://www.pregnantpause.org/numbers/fertility.htm#us

I have had 5 kids age 25 to 35 and no grand kids so far . My
generation 6 adults my brother and sister and Ingrids brother and
sister have had 12 kids. One died and one has had 2 children. We are
going extinct .

Movie

http://www.amazon.com/Idiocracy-Luke...ref=sr_1_1?s=d
vd&ie=UTF8&qid=1279644554&sr=1-1


Also available at better libraries near you.

Billy, may I suggest http://bit.ly/ for shortening those long wrapping urls.
The last one you list requires extra cut & paste for me & I'm sure others.


Sorry, Wilson, I've always have had a phobia about short URLs because
you don't know if they are taking you to Romania, or Pakistan. In this
particular case it was the fault of Bill who Putters. I do bricolage.
What kind of reader are you using that can't paste an URL? I sometimes
do it with URLs that are 3 lines long. I'm using NewsWatcher, which can
be downloaded for free.
--
- Billy
"Fascism should more properly be called corporatism because it is the
merger of state and corporate power." - Benito Mussolini.
http://www.democracynow.org/2010/7/2/maude
http://www.democracynow.org/2010/6/2...al_crime_scene
  #7   Report Post  
Old 21-07-2010, 10:53 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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First recorded activity by GardenBanter: May 2009
Posts: 1,085
Default USDA Admits Link Between Antibiotic Use by Big Ag and Human Health

In article
,
Billy wrote:

In article ,
Wilson wrote:

On 07/20/10 7:12 PM, sometime in the recent past Billy posted this:
In ,
Bill who wrote:

In article
,
wrote:


Fossil fuel have done enough damage, and they need to be reduced, and
then terminated. They are no more sustainable than the fossil water
that
we pump from ancient aquifers. If we had leaders, they would tell us so
and do the work that must be done for us to survive. Require reduction
of fossil fuel CO2 emissions. Require population controls. Require
lessening our dependence on grains, and encourage consumption of
vegetables.

http://www.pregnantpause.org/numbers/fertility.htm#us

I have had 5 kids age 25 to 35 and no grand kids so far . My
generation 6 adults my brother and sister and Ingrids brother and
sister have had 12 kids. One died and one has had 2 children. We are
going extinct .

Movie

http://www.amazon.com/Idiocracy-Luke...ref=sr_1_1?s=d
vd&ie=UTF8&qid=1279644554&sr=1-1

Also available at better libraries near you.

Billy, may I suggest http://bit.ly/ for shortening those long wrapping
urls.
The last one you list requires extra cut & paste for me & I'm sure others.


Sorry, Wilson, I've always have had a phobia about short URLs because
you don't know if they are taking you to Romania, or Pakistan. In this
particular case it was the fault of Bill who Putters. I do bricolage.
What kind of reader are you using that can't paste an URL? I sometimes
do it with URLs that are 3 lines long. I'm using NewsWatcher, which can
be downloaded for free.


I can click on the Delimited url twice and willa bing willa boom.

--
Bill S. Jersey USA zone 5 shade garden
What use one more wake up call?

  #8   Report Post  
Old 22-07-2010, 01:25 AM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Jun 2008
Posts: 30
Default USDA Admits Link Between Antibiotic Use by Big Ag and Human Health

On 07/21/10 4:39 PM, sometime in the recent past Billy posted this:
In ,
wrote:

On 07/20/10 7:12 PM, sometime in the recent past Billy posted this:
In ,
Bill who wrote:

In article
,
wrote:


Fossil fuel have done enough damage, and they need to be reduced, and
then terminated. They are no more sustainable than the fossil water that
we pump from ancient aquifers. If we had leaders, they would tell us so
and do the work that must be done for us to survive. Require reduction
of fossil fuel CO2 emissions. Require population controls. Require
lessening our dependence on grains, and encourage consumption of
vegetables.

http://www.pregnantpause.org/numbers/fertility.htm#us

I have had 5 kids age 25 to 35 and no grand kids so far . My
generation 6 adults my brother and sister and Ingrids brother and
sister have had 12 kids. One died and one has had 2 children. We are
going extinct .

Movie

http://www.amazon.com/Idiocracy-Luke...ref=sr_1_1?s=d
vd&ie=UTF8&qid=1279644554&sr=1-1

Also available at better libraries near you.

Billy, may I suggest http://bit.ly/ for shortening those long wrapping urls.
The last one you list requires extra cut& paste for me& I'm sure others.


Sorry, Wilson, I've always have had a phobia about short URLs because
you don't know if they are taking you to Romania, or Pakistan. In this
particular case it was the fault of Bill who Putters. I do bricolage.
What kind of reader are you using that can't paste an URL? I sometimes
do it with URLs that are 3 lines long. I'm using NewsWatcher, which can
be downloaded for free.

I have my own phobias, no problem. Actually, I looked at the url and saw
that it had word-wrapped and part wasn't highlighted and 'assumed' that it
wouldn't work until 'Bill who putters' said it worked for him. I then found
that it worked for me too, just as well as it did after cutting & pasting.

I use Thunderbird to read the group and it seems that it works fine. Most of
the time, I don't worry about who shortens the url as long as it works for
the next reader. And Firefox has an add-on called Snip-n-tag that grabs the
url, shortens & copies it to the clipboard for pasting. Just saying.

--
Wilson 44.69, -67.3
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Old 22-07-2010, 01:43 AM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Posts: 3,036
Default USDA Admits Link Between Antibiotic Use by Big Ag and Human Health

Billy wrote:

I do bricolage.


Oh new word for the day!

David
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