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Old 08-07-2003, 10:15 PM
Ann
 
Posts: n/a
Default unidentifiable plant

I have spent hours using Keble-Martin and the Internet to no avail,
trying to identify what would seem from the pictures to be a
euphorbia. But I don't think it can be that.
If I were to write some features of the plant to the best of my
ability, do you think you could identify it? Don't know if it's wild
or a garden variety. A weed I suspect.

Two self-sown seedlings in a 10" pot
Height abt. 1 metre.
Single stem, opposite, hairless, obovate, stalkless, serrated 8-10cm
darkish green, thick, tough leaves every 5/6cm. White central
mid-rib abt. 6mm wide at junction with stem. Small leaflet in axil.
Leaves not glaucous - no milk.
Stem pale greyish-white.
Approx 8cm from top of the main stem, are 5-6 umbel-like stems, up to
14cm long. Leaves on these short stems are approx 2cm long.
At top of each short stem of the umbel, small leaf ?bracts have opened
layer upon layer to finally reveal and onion-dome-shaped hard, tight,
greyish-green "capsule" with thin yellow "lines of longitude" meeting
at the tip of the "capsule".
So now there is the uninteresting stem, barely able to sustain its own
weight (the stem is now kinked)topped by an umbrel of 5-6 solid
"flowers". Looks as if each "capsule" will at any moment burst into
flower, but I guess the "capsule" is the flower. No smell or scent.
Please solve the mystery if possible from my description as to what
exactly this is. I'm in Kent, UK - S.E.. corner.
T

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Old 08-07-2003, 10:41 PM
Cereoid-UR12-
 
Posts: n/a
Default unidentifiable plant

You are right. It is unidentifiable because you left out a description of
the flower parts.

How many locules to the capsule? How many seeds in each locule?

If it doesn't have a milky sap, it definitely is not a Euphorbia.

The internet really sucks as a "tool" for identifying plants, doesn't it?


Ann wrote in message
m...
I have spent hours using Keble-Martin and the Internet to no avail,
trying to identify what would seem from the pictures to be a
euphorbia. But I don't think it can be that.
If I were to write some features of the plant to the best of my
ability, do you think you could identify it? Don't know if it's wild
or a garden variety. A weed I suspect.

Two self-sown seedlings in a 10" pot
Height abt. 1 metre.
Single stem, opposite, hairless, obovate, stalkless, serrated 8-10cm
darkish green, thick, tough leaves every 5/6cm. White central
mid-rib abt. 6mm wide at junction with stem. Small leaflet in axil.
Leaves not glaucous - no milk.
Stem pale greyish-white.
Approx 8cm from top of the main stem, are 5-6 umbel-like stems, up to
14cm long. Leaves on these short stems are approx 2cm long.
At top of each short stem of the umbel, small leaf ?bracts have opened
layer upon layer to finally reveal and onion-dome-shaped hard, tight,
greyish-green "capsule" with thin yellow "lines of longitude" meeting
at the tip of the "capsule".
So now there is the uninteresting stem, barely able to sustain its own
weight (the stem is now kinked)topped by an umbrel of 5-6 solid
"flowers". Looks as if each "capsule" will at any moment burst into
flower, but I guess the "capsule" is the flower. No smell or scent.
Please solve the mystery if possible from my description as to what
exactly this is. I'm in Kent, UK - S.E.. corner.
T



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Old 08-07-2003, 11:36 PM
Stewart Robert Hinsley
 
Posts: n/a
Default unidentifiable plant

In article , Ann
writes
I have spent hours using Keble-Martin and the Internet to no avail,
trying to identify what would seem from the pictures to be a
euphorbia. But I don't think it can be that.
If I were to write some features of the plant to the best of my
ability, do you think you could identify it? Don't know if it's wild
or a garden variety. A weed I suspect.

Two self-sown seedlings in a 10" pot
Height abt. 1 metre.
Single stem, opposite, hairless, obovate, stalkless, serrated 8-10cm
darkish green, thick, tough leaves every 5/6cm. White central
mid-rib abt. 6mm wide at junction with stem. Small leaflet in axil.
Leaves not glaucous - no milk.
Stem pale greyish-white.
Approx 8cm from top of the main stem, are 5-6 umbel-like stems, up to
14cm long. Leaves on these short stems are approx 2cm long.
At top of each short stem of the umbel, small leaf ?bracts have opened
layer upon layer to finally reveal and onion-dome-shaped hard, tight,
greyish-green "capsule" with thin yellow "lines of longitude" meeting
at the tip of the "capsule".
So now there is the uninteresting stem, barely able to sustain its own
weight (the stem is now kinked)topped by an umbrel of 5-6 solid
"flowers". Looks as if each "capsule" will at any moment burst into
flower, but I guess the "capsule" is the flower. No smell or scent.
Please solve the mystery if possible from my description as to what
exactly this is. I'm in Kent, UK - S.E.. corner.
T


Assuming a Euphorbia, the key in Stace (New Flora of the British Isles)
gives Caper Spurge, _Euphorbia lathyris_. All the other erect species
described therein have alternate leaves on the main stem.

"9. E. lathyris L. - Caper Spurge. Glabrous biennial; stems to 1m in 1st
year, producing inflorescence from top and to 2m in 2nd year; leaves
linear to narrowly oblong-lanceolate, sessile, entire, +/- glaucous; ...
Possibly native in shady places in S En, frequent casual in waste places
and gardens over much of Br and CI."

Otherwise your description suggests Broad-leaved Spurge, _E.
platyphyllos_, or Upright Spurge, _E. serrulata_ (both to 80 cm, leaves
obovate to elliptic, serrulate), or to a lesser degree _E. x
pseudovirgata_ (_E. uralensis_ in Keble-Martin) (leaves sometimes +/-
oblanceolate, entire). The 80 cm isn't a complete killer for the
identification - according to Stace _Malva sylvestris_ growns to 100 cm,
and according to Flora Europaea to 150 cm (perhaps the British form is
smaller), but I know where there's a wild (feral?) specimen reaching 225
cm.

And there's also the remote possibility of a less common garden escape
or a hybrid.
--
Stewart Robert Hinsley
  #4   Report Post  
Old 08-07-2003, 11:39 PM
Stewart Robert Hinsley
 
Posts: n/a
Default unidentifiable plant

In article , Ann
writes
I have spent hours using Keble-Martin and the Internet to no avail,
trying to identify what would seem from the pictures to be a
euphorbia. But I don't think it can be that.
If I were to write some features of the plant to the best of my
ability, do you think you could identify it? Don't know if it's wild
or a garden variety. A weed I suspect.

Two self-sown seedlings in a 10" pot
Height abt. 1 metre.
Single stem, opposite, hairless, obovate, stalkless, serrated 8-10cm
darkish green, thick, tough leaves every 5/6cm. White central
mid-rib abt. 6mm wide at junction with stem. Small leaflet in axil.
Leaves not glaucous - no milk.
Stem pale greyish-white.
Approx 8cm from top of the main stem, are 5-6 umbel-like stems, up to
14cm long. Leaves on these short stems are approx 2cm long.
At top of each short stem of the umbel, small leaf ?bracts have opened
layer upon layer to finally reveal and onion-dome-shaped hard, tight,
greyish-green "capsule" with thin yellow "lines of longitude" meeting
at the tip of the "capsule".
So now there is the uninteresting stem, barely able to sustain its own
weight (the stem is now kinked)topped by an umbrel of 5-6 solid
"flowers". Looks as if each "capsule" will at any moment burst into
flower, but I guess the "capsule" is the flower. No smell or scent.
Please solve the mystery if possible from my description as to what
exactly this is. I'm in Kent, UK - S.E.. corner.
T


Assuming a Euphorbia, the key in Stace (New Flora of the British Isles)
gives Caper Spurge, _Euphorbia lathyris_. All the other erect species
described therein have alternate leaves on the main stem.

"9. E. lathyris L. - Caper Spurge. Glabrous biennial; stems to 1m in 1st
year, producing inflorescence from top and to 2m in 2nd year; leaves
linear to narrowly oblong-lanceolate, sessile, entire, +/- glaucous; ...
Possibly native in shady places in S En, frequent casual in waste places
and gardens over much of Br and CI."

Otherwise your description suggests Broad-leaved Spurge, _E.
platyphyllos_, or Upright Spurge, _E. serrulata_ (both to 80 cm, leaves
obovate to elliptic, serrulate), or to a lesser degree _E. x
pseudovirgata_ (_E. uralensis_ in Keble-Martin) (leaves sometimes +/-
oblanceolate, entire). The 80 cm isn't a complete killer for the
identification - according to Stace _Malva sylvestris_ growns to 100 cm,
and according to Flora Europaea to 150 cm (perhaps the British form is
smaller), but I know where there's a wild (feral?) specimen reaching 225
cm.

And there's also the remote possibility of a less common garden escape
or a hybrid.
--
Stewart Robert Hinsley
  #5   Report Post  
Old 09-07-2003, 12:32 AM
Cereoid-UR12-
 
Posts: n/a
Default unidentifiable plant

Most likely its not a Euphorbia at all because all of those you mention have
a milky sap and her's doesn't.


Stewart Robert Hinsley wrote in message
...
In article , Ann
writes
I have spent hours using Keble-Martin and the Internet to no avail,
trying to identify what would seem from the pictures to be a
euphorbia. But I don't think it can be that.
If I were to write some features of the plant to the best of my
ability, do you think you could identify it? Don't know if it's wild
or a garden variety. A weed I suspect.

Two self-sown seedlings in a 10" pot
Height abt. 1 metre.
Single stem, opposite, hairless, obovate, stalkless, serrated 8-10cm
darkish green, thick, tough leaves every 5/6cm. White central
mid-rib abt. 6mm wide at junction with stem. Small leaflet in axil.
Leaves not glaucous - no milk.
Stem pale greyish-white.
Approx 8cm from top of the main stem, are 5-6 umbel-like stems, up to
14cm long. Leaves on these short stems are approx 2cm long.
At top of each short stem of the umbel, small leaf ?bracts have opened
layer upon layer to finally reveal and onion-dome-shaped hard, tight,
greyish-green "capsule" with thin yellow "lines of longitude" meeting
at the tip of the "capsule".
So now there is the uninteresting stem, barely able to sustain its own
weight (the stem is now kinked)topped by an umbrel of 5-6 solid
"flowers". Looks as if each "capsule" will at any moment burst into
flower, but I guess the "capsule" is the flower. No smell or scent.
Please solve the mystery if possible from my description as to what
exactly this is. I'm in Kent, UK - S.E.. corner.
T


Assuming a Euphorbia, the key in Stace (New Flora of the British Isles)
gives Caper Spurge, _Euphorbia lathyris_. All the other erect species
described therein have alternate leaves on the main stem.

"9. E. lathyris L. - Caper Spurge. Glabrous biennial; stems to 1m in 1st
year, producing inflorescence from top and to 2m in 2nd year; leaves
linear to narrowly oblong-lanceolate, sessile, entire, +/- glaucous; ...
Possibly native in shady places in S En, frequent casual in waste places
and gardens over much of Br and CI."

Otherwise your description suggests Broad-leaved Spurge, _E.
platyphyllos_, or Upright Spurge, _E. serrulata_ (both to 80 cm, leaves
obovate to elliptic, serrulate), or to a lesser degree _E. x
pseudovirgata_ (_E. uralensis_ in Keble-Martin) (leaves sometimes +/-
oblanceolate, entire). The 80 cm isn't a complete killer for the
identification - according to Stace _Malva sylvestris_ growns to 100 cm,
and according to Flora Europaea to 150 cm (perhaps the British form is
smaller), but I know where there's a wild (feral?) specimen reaching 225
cm.

And there's also the remote possibility of a less common garden escape
or a hybrid.
--
Stewart Robert Hinsley





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Old 09-07-2003, 10:20 AM
Martin Rand
 
Posts: n/a
Default unidentifiable plant

On Tue, 8 Jul 2003 23:19:03 +0100, Stewart Robert Hinsley
wrote:

In article , Ann
writes
I have spent hours using Keble-Martin and the Internet to no avail,
trying to identify what would seem from the pictures to be a
euphorbia. But I don't think it can be that.
If I were to write some features of the plant to the best of my
ability, do you think you could identify it? Don't know if it's wild
or a garden variety. A weed I suspect.

Two self-sown seedlings in a 10" pot
Height abt. 1 metre.
Single stem, opposite, hairless, obovate, stalkless, serrated 8-10cm
darkish green, thick, tough leaves every 5/6cm. White central
mid-rib abt. 6mm wide at junction with stem. Small leaflet in axil.
Leaves not glaucous - no milk.
Stem pale greyish-white.
Approx 8cm from top of the main stem, are 5-6 umbel-like stems, up to
14cm long. Leaves on these short stems are approx 2cm long.
At top of each short stem of the umbel, small leaf ?bracts have opened
layer upon layer to finally reveal and onion-dome-shaped hard, tight,
greyish-green "capsule" with thin yellow "lines of longitude" meeting
at the tip of the "capsule".
So now there is the uninteresting stem, barely able to sustain its own
weight (the stem is now kinked)topped by an umbrel of 5-6 solid
"flowers". Looks as if each "capsule" will at any moment burst into
flower, but I guess the "capsule" is the flower. No smell or scent.
Please solve the mystery if possible from my description as to what
exactly this is. I'm in Kent, UK - S.E.. corner.
T


Assuming a Euphorbia, the key in Stace (New Flora of the British Isles)
gives Caper Spurge, _Euphorbia lathyris_. All the other erect species
described therein have alternate leaves on the main stem.

"9. E. lathyris L. - Caper Spurge. Glabrous biennial; stems to 1m in 1st
year, producing inflorescence from top and to 2m in 2nd year; leaves
linear to narrowly oblong-lanceolate, sessile, entire, +/- glaucous; ...
Possibly native in shady places in S En, frequent casual in waste places
and gardens over much of Br and CI."

Definitely not E. lathyris. No latex = not Euphorbia. In any case
toothed obovate leaves = not E. lathyris. Small leaflets in axils
won't do, either.

Otherwise your description suggests Broad-leaved Spurge, _E.
platyphyllos_, or Upright Spurge, _E. serrulata_ (both to 80 cm, leaves
obovate to elliptic, serrulate), or to a lesser degree _E. x
pseudovirgata_ (_E. uralensis_ in Keble-Martin) (leaves sometimes +/-
oblanceolate, entire).

Apart from the lack of latex, none of these has opposite leaves.

The 80 cm isn't a complete killer for the
identification - according to Stace _Malva sylvestris_ growns to 100 cm,
and according to Flora Europaea to 150 cm (perhaps the British form is
smaller), but I know where there's a wild (feral?) specimen reaching 225
cm.




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