Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1   Report Post  
Old 19-11-2019, 05:36 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: May 2010
Posts: 190
Default Mystery plants revisited

Some may recall my request for ID of two plants that sprang up in our
garden in September/October -- I recorded them at
https://photos.app.goo.gl/5Ebgj4oWNHEwXkdi9

Plant "A" is the first two photos on that page, Plant "B" is the second
two photos.

(I think that) the consensus was that they are merely niger/nyger plants
that had sprung from discarded seed, thanks to the bizarre weather
conditions (so what's, now, new?) of this past year.

We've now had severe frosts, and it's bye-bye to the two mystery guests.
I took more photos before digging them up. These are at

https://photos.app.goo.gl/yhLaxss2tJX2QNGA6

(Don't forget to avail yourself of Googlephotos' magnifying glass if you
want a closer look.)

The first three are Plant "A", and the other 4 are plant "B".
You can see that A was still showing no signs of flowering, and also
that it has a conventional root system. (The hairy stalk, by the way,
was _not_ sticky, that I could detect.)

B was showing signs of flowering all over by this time, but of course
there was no chance of the flowers emerging. There was no tuber: just
conventional roots, again; an interesting stalk, I thought, hence the
cross-section photo.

Hope this is of interest to some!

Cheers
John

  #2   Report Post  
Old 19-11-2019, 06:09 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: May 2012
Posts: 2,894
Default Mystery plants revisited

On 19/11/2019 16:36, Another John wrote:
Some may recall my request for ID of two plants that sprang up in our
garden in September/October -- I recorded them at
https://photos.app.goo.gl/5Ebgj4oWNHEwXkdi9

Plant "A" is the first two photos on that page, Plant "B" is the second
two photos.

(I think that) the consensus was that they are merely niger/nyger plants
that had sprung from discarded seed, thanks to the bizarre weather
conditions (so what's, now, new?) of this past year.

We've now had severe frosts, and it's bye-bye to the two mystery guests.
I took more photos before digging them up. These are at

https://photos.app.goo.gl/yhLaxss2tJX2QNGA6

(Don't forget to avail yourself of Googlephotos' magnifying glass if you
want a closer look.)

The first three are Plant "A", and the other 4 are plant "B".
You can see that A was still showing no signs of flowering, and also
that it has a conventional root system. (The hairy stalk, by the way,
was _not_ sticky, that I could detect.)

B was showing signs of flowering all over by this time, but of course
there was no chance of the flowers emerging. There was no tuber: just
conventional roots, again; an interesting stalk, I thought, hence the
cross-section photo.

Hope this is of interest to some!

Cheers
John

Interesting!
I would javwe potted them both up after pruning back and would keep them
frost free over the winter, then if they grow on in the spring every
chance of them flowering in due course.
If they dont make it through to the spring you will just have 2 dead post.
Nothing to loose realy.
  #3   Report Post  
Old 19-11-2019, 09:16 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Jul 2006
Posts: 1,775
Default Mystery plants revisited

On 19/11/2019 16:36, Another John wrote:
Some may recall my request for ID of two plants that sprang up in our
garden in September/October -- I recorded them at
https://photos.app.goo.gl/5Ebgj4oWNHEwXkdi9

Plant "A" is the first two photos on that page, Plant "B" is the second
two photos.

(I think that) the consensus was that they are merely niger/nyger plants
that had sprung from discarded seed, thanks to the bizarre weather
conditions (so what's, now, new?) of this past year.

We've now had severe frosts, and it's bye-bye to the two mystery guests.
I took more photos before digging them up. These are at

https://photos.app.goo.gl/yhLaxss2tJX2QNGA6

(Don't forget to avail yourself of Googlephotos' magnifying glass if you
want a closer look.)

The first three are Plant "A", and the other 4 are plant "B".
You can see that A was still showing no signs of flowering, and also
that it has a conventional root system. (The hairy stalk, by the way,
was _not_ sticky, that I could detect.)

B was showing signs of flowering all over by this time, but of course
there was no chance of the flowers emerging. There was no tuber: just
conventional roots, again; an interesting stalk, I thought, hence the
cross-section photo.

Hope this is of interest to some!

Cheers
John


The forming flowers of plant B look like a composite, but then we were
all pretty sure it was a composite anyway. The bracts/reduced leaves
below the bud might be informative if we knew where to look. It looks
somewhat woody, which suggests that it is perennial. (OTOH, so are
raspberry canes, and individual canes are annual or biennial.)
  #4   Report Post  
Old 20-11-2019, 09:40 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: May 2010
Posts: 190
Default Mystery plants revisited

In article ,
David Hill wrote:

Interesting!
I would have potted them both up after pruning back and would keep them
frost free over the winter,


DOH!! Blast!

John


Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Mystery Weed Identified, new mystery weed, Central Ohio Ron Hardin Plant Science 5 22-04-2006 12:23 AM
Oleander/toxicity revisited Lou Minatti Gardening 3 06-05-2003 03:20 AM
cap'n blood here - was: worms revisited Fran Higham Permaculture 18 05-05-2003 02:08 PM
Holly problem revisited: Gerneral request Paul Kelly United Kingdom 0 26-03-2003 02:08 PM
Worms revisited Janet Baraclough Permaculture 8 22-10-2002 03:31 AM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 02:37 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2019 GardenBanter.co.uk.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about Gardening"

 

Copyright © 2017