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Best vines to cover a chain link fence



 
 
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  #1  
Old 20-05-2003, 12:32 AM
Logic 3:16
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Default Best vines to cover a chain link fence


Hi folks.

I live in New York and I have a rusty (but sturdy) old 4 foot high chain
link fence right next to my house, and I want to cover it with some kind of
vines to get a little privacy and block the view of my neighbor's messy
yard. These are the qualities I am looking for:

1) A perennial that remains full and green year-round

2) Dense so that it covers the fence thoroughly.

3) Fast growing, but not invasive and should require minimum trimming (I
don't want to be rude by having it take over my neighbors yard).

4) Has strong sturdy stems so that the vines can grow a foot or more higher
than the fence itself.

5) Is hardy (disease/drought resistant and has good tolerance for winter).

6) Area has very little shade, so it must be able to handle long periods of
direct sunlight.

7) Produces nice flowers.

It is also desireable (but not essential) that the flowers on the vines have
a long blooming period and produce a nice scent.

Thanks in advance for your tips!

- logic316


"Outside of a dog, a book is a man's best friend. Inside a dog it's too
dark to read."
- Groucho Marx





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  #2  
Old 20-05-2003, 12:56 AM
David J. Bockman
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Posts: n/a
Default Best vines to cover a chain link fence

Check to see if these are hardy in your Zone:

Lonicera sempervirens*, Trumpet Honeysuckle or Coral Honeysuckle
Range: Conn. To Florida, west to Texas Fam. Caprifoliaceae
Leaves: opposite, elliptic to ovate, 1-3" long, dark bluish-green above,
glaucous beneath, I - 2 pairs below inflorescence fused into an oblong disk,
rounded at the ends. New growth is reddish purple, leafs out early and has
semi-evergreen tendencies, losing leaves quite late in fall.
Flowers: tubular, non-fragrant, orange red to red on outside and usually
yellow to yellow-orange inside tubular corolla. 1 - 21/2" long borne in 3 -
4 whorled spike, each whorl with 4 - 6 flowers. Four upper lobes of corolla
are of equal proportions with one lower lobe nearly so - giving 5-lobed
look. Fruit - is a " round shiny red berry in fall.
Habit: twining vine, reaching 10- 20' in height, not nearly as rampant as L.
japonica, etc., Fast growing.
Cultu Prefers moist, well-drained, acid to neutral soils, full sun but
will flower in and tolerate partial shade. Provide support or else vine
will become tangled mess. Prune after flowering to control size or to
shape.
D&I: none serious, sometimes leaf spot, and aphids can be a problem
occasionally but can be sprayed with a hard jet of water to remove.
Landscape Uses: Great twining vine with good foliage and flowers. Great on
trellises, picket fences, etc. Great hummingbird attractor. Great vine - I
couldn't be without it - especially the repeat blooming cultivars!!!
'John Clayton' - yellow flowered cultivar, compact vine, repeat flowering
'Alabama Scarlet' - red flowers perpetual flowering

2. Lonicera x brownii, Brown's Honeysuckle
From hybrids crosses of L. sempervirens and L. hirsute, resembles former in
most characters.
Extremely hardy to Z. 4 - 7.
'Dropmore Scarlet' - commonly available cultivar with orangy-red tubular
flowers with yellow inside of corolla. Flowers heavily in May and continues
in flushes through fall. Hummingbirds love it.
Lonicera x heckrottii, Goldflame Honeysuckle
(Of unknown origin- probably L. sempervirens x L. americana)
Leaves: opposite, oblong to oval, 11/2 - 21/2" long and 2/3's as wide,
glabrous, dark bluish-green, glaucous beneath, scarcely petioled, upper
leaves fused at base and form a disk that subtends flower
Habit: twining vine to 10-20' high.
Flowers: Flower buds are carmine-rose, opening to creamy-yellow inside the
corolla and pink-rose on the outside giving lovely 2-toned effect. Slightly
fragrant. Borne in elongated peduncle spikes in whorls. Blooms in late
May-June and then sporadically heavy bloom thru summer and into fall. New
flowers develop on new growth. Tubular corolla has 4 finger - like lobes on
upper edge and 1 on lower.
Cultu as above, is susceptible to aphids, insecticidal soap or a hard
spray of water as needed.

3. Gelsemiuim serpervirens*, Carolina Yellow Jessamine
Zones : 6 - 9 Native to SE: VA to FL
Another native twining vine found throughout the SE that blooms in early
spring/winter in the South and in late March/ April in mid-Atlantic. Grows
10 - 20' and never gets overwhelming or heavy, even though it is found
draped through trees throughout the SE.
Leaves: evergreen, glossy dark green, 1 - 31/2" long are handsome all year
all though they may bronze and discolor in severe winters.
Flowers: covered in bright yellow funnel - shaped flowers that are fragrant
for at least a month in early spring.
Cultu full sun to part shade, easy in any well-drained soil. Great as a
showy evergreen vine on trellises, mailboxes, or even as groundcovers.
Similar Species:
Gelsemium rankii*, Swamp Jessamine - a closely related and similar vine that
thrives in swampy, poorly drained soils along streams from N.C. to FL and
hardy to Z. 7 - 9. Differs from above in flowering in spring and fall and
in flowers with NO fragrance.

"Logic 3:16" wrote in message
t...

Hi folks.

I live in New York and I have a rusty (but sturdy) old 4 foot high chain
link fence right next to my house, and I want to cover it with some kind

of
vines to get a little privacy and block the view of my neighbor's messy
yard. These are the qualities I am looking for:

1) A perennial that remains full and green year-round

2) Dense so that it covers the fence thoroughly.

3) Fast growing, but not invasive and should require minimum trimming (I
don't want to be rude by having it take over my neighbors yard).

4) Has strong sturdy stems so that the vines can grow a foot or more

higher
than the fence itself.

5) Is hardy (disease/drought resistant and has good tolerance for winter).

6) Area has very little shade, so it must be able to handle long periods

of
direct sunlight.

7) Produces nice flowers.

It is also desireable (but not essential) that the flowers on the vines

have
a long blooming period and produce a nice scent.

Thanks in advance for your tips!

- logic316


"Outside of a dog, a book is a man's best friend. Inside a dog it's too
dark to read."
- Groucho Marx







  #3  
Old 20-05-2003, 01:32 PM
xcitor
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Best vines to cover a chain link fence

On Mon, 19 May 2003 22:27:38 GMT, Logic 3:16 wrote:
|
| Hi folks.
|
| I live in New York and I have a rusty (but sturdy) old 4 foot high chain
| link fence right next to my house, and I want to cover it with some kind of
| vines to get a little privacy and block the view of my neighbor's messy
| yard. These are the qualities I am looking for:

it doesn't meet all of your requirements, but a climbing hydrangea might be
just the ticket for you. a quick search for `climbing hydrangea' at
images.google.com returned many excellent examples.

in the experience i've had with mine, it may not grow as quickly as you're
looking for, but it is well worth the wait, IMHO.

--john
 




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