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Old 02-06-2017, 09:00 AM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Default Ground Cover ID?


"Pavel314" wrote in message
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Can anyone identify the plant in this picture?

http://s1346.photobucket.com/user/pa...tml?sort=3&o=0


It's a ground cover plant in our front yard. The leaves are white in the
center and dark green around the edges, about two inches long. They have
bunches of purple flowers on the end of the stalks and are about 4"-6"
high.

Paul


Bearing in mind I have no idea what I am doing, most of the time, the leaves
on that give the impression of a begonia.

Mike



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Old 02-06-2017, 07:32 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Default Ground Cover ID?

On Friday, June 2, 2017 at 4:02:12 AM UTC-4, Bloke Down The Pub wrote:
"Pavel314" wrote in message
...
Can anyone identify the plant in this picture?

http://s1346.photobucket.com/user/pa...tml?sort=3&o=0


It's a ground cover plant in our front yard. The leaves are white in the
center and dark green around the edges, about two inches long. They have
bunches of purple flowers on the end of the stalks and are about 4"-6"
high.

Paul


Bearing in mind I have no idea what I am doing, most of the time, the leaves
on that give the impression of a begonia.

Mike


A lot more googling around answered the question; they're called lamium. We have a bed of them under the big oak tree out front, and I was going to transplant a few to the gully along the road, where I can't mow. Unfortunately, they don't grow well in direct sunlight, so that wouldn't work.

Paul
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Old 03-06-2017, 01:37 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Default Ground Cover ID?

Pavel314 wrote:
....
A lot more googling around answered the question; they're called lamium. We have a bed of them under the big oak tree out front, and I was going to transplant a few to the gully along the road, where I can't mow. Unfortunately, they don't grow well in direct sunlight, so that wouldn't work.


any of the thymes we grow would work for that.
the nicer benefit is that they smell nice when
you weed or trim them (if you mow them start with
a cleaned mower and set the blade up high, do
once a year to get the dead flower stalks and it
neatens them up).

hens and chicks also work for rocky spots where
you can poke some in the gaps if there's just a
bit of dirt, but the deer seem to enjoy eating
these...


songbird


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