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Old 13-05-2018, 02:15 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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On Saturday, May 12, 2018 at 8:23:40 AM UTC-4, Terry Coombs wrote:
On 5/12/2018 6:26 AM, songbird wrote:
Terry Coombs wrote:
...re straw mulch...
┬* I've already tilled a couple of layers into the soil , it's made a
world of difference in moisture retention . Coupled with rows that cut
across the slope of the land it lets most of the rain soak in rather
than running off .

yes that's all going to help.

in some gardens, over many years, people will take
the soil that washes down and move it back to the
top as a regular part of their garden routine.

i terrace the areas i can, luckily i don't have that
much of a slope anywhere, but one location where the
front septic drainfield is at is raised up and that
then slopes towards the back (downwards through what i
call the North Garden). i don't have it formally
terraced because i keep playing around in there with
varous plantings.

always plenty to do for sure.


songbird


┬* I've also been working on terracing the garden . The lower third is
pretty much level , as is the top section . The middle is still sloped
some , I can only do so much without getting into the subsoil , but that
area is also deeply furrowed .

--
Snag
Ain't no dollar sign on
peace of mind - Zac Brown


My wife's vegetable garden is on a sloped part of the yard. She constructed what she calls "barrows", raised ridges of dirt and compost, perpendicular to the fall line. These catch and slow the water as it flows downhill during a rain.

There's a central path going right down the fall line but she constructed "hydraulics" on that, raised sections between the rows to divert any flowing water off the main path into the paths between the barrows, where it will be slowed down and absorbed into the ground.

All of the paths are covered with landscape fabric to keep down the weeds.

Paul

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Old 13-05-2018, 03:23 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Pavel314 wrote:
....
My wife's vegetable garden is on a sloped part of the yard. She constructed what she calls "barrows", raised ridges of dirt and compost, perpendicular to the fall line. These catch and slow the water as it flows downhill during a rain.

There's a central path going right down the fall line but she constructed "hydraulics" on that, raised sections between the rows to divert any flowing water off the main path into the paths between the barrows, where it will be slowed down and absorbed into the ground.


in the permaculture verbiage they call them swales.

with our soils and some storms being heavy i have been
designing our place to capture as much as possible but also
to deal with the flash floods.

all of this needed in our heavy clay soil, once it gets
soaked down well it doesn't hold more. that's at about 4-6
inches of rain depending upon how fast it comes down.

the following contains way more information than most
people want to read:

http://www.anthive.com/project/water/


All of the paths are covered with landscape fabric to keep down the weeds.


it helps. we've used old chunks of carpeting in some
places and then put rinsed crushed limestone over it and
not much gets through that. luckily most of those types
of pathways are inside the fenced area or in front where
there aren't too many issues from neighboring areas trying
to send roots under the paths.

out back i have some more serious weeds that aren't
stopped by a shallow edge and some will run a dozen
feet horizontal under a pathway if given the chance.


songbird
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Old 13-05-2018, 03:25 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Terry Coombs wrote:
....
┬* I've also been working on terracing the garden . The lower third is
pretty much level , as is the top section . The middle is still sloped
some , I can only do so much without getting into the subsoil , but that
area is also deeply furrowed .


it's nice when you finally get a garden into
shape.


songbird
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Old 13-05-2018, 08:54 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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songbird wrote:

haven't planted yet, but getting close to doing
cucumbers. we're still having frosts/frost warnings so
i won't be planting any of the warm weather crops for
several weeks yet at the soonest. peas and onion seeds
i may start scratching some in here or there when i get
a chance.

Aside from a couple of notable exceptions, this past winter was
warm but not unusually so. We're in sure-enough springtime now, though,
with lows near 60 and highs in mid-high 80s. Slight possibilities of
rain tease but at best won't be enough to displace irrigation, so....
The seasonal fall stuff is pretty much all gone as is the second
planting of English peas ("Thomas Laxton", planted in midľFebruary).
The spinach planted in December, AWA that planted in February, has
yielded to the heat and sunshine. Onions are beginning to form bulbs
and should be ready for harvest soon. December carrots are at "must
take" before the weather gets any warmer and the February carrots are
likely to be tomorrow's compost today because carrots just don't like
hot weather. Have a bed of gigantic turnips that've been growing since
October, along with a group of more sensibly sized turnips (those white
globes with magenta tops) planted in March. Still harvesting Provider
beans planted in February and March. "White acre" cowpeas, planted in
early April, are coming along well and yellow squash is showing its
first blossoms. "Zipper cream" cowpeas and Delinel green beans are in
the works, having been planted on Saturday, 12 May. A few eggplants and
tomatoes are ready to move into the garden, although I'm not sure
whether to fool with tomatoes, though. Tomatoes fall into the
"what-the-hell" category most years, it there's space available.
Strawberries are bearing again, to the delight of late-night snacking
raccoons. Okra seedlings close to ready to transplant. I ususally
direct seed okra but this year it's moving into a bed with established
plants that would shade seedlings. Waiting for jalape˝o and sweet
peppers to sprout. Dedicating a significant portion of the garden to
peppers this year, attempting to grow more than ever before.
--
Derald
Peninsular FL, USA
USDA 9b


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