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Old 27-01-2004, 02:08 PM
J Fortuna
 
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Default moss on cochleanthes roots?

I have a cochleanthes amazonica which I am still trying to understand (so
far not doing all that well). It came in a clear pot, and it has a bunch of
moss that is growing on top of the medium and also on some of the roots. It
came with this moss when I bought it from a vendor. Is this moss harmful to
it, or is it ok to leave it there? If it is harmful, what should I do about
it?

Thanks,
Joanna



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Old 27-01-2004, 02:34 PM
Ray
 
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Default moss on cochleanthes roots?

On those rare occasions where I've seen moss, it seems to have no negative
impact whatsoever. Even in my greenhouse, the stuff eventually dies,
despite frequent watering and high humidity.

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Plants, Supplies, Books, Artwork, and Lots of Free Info!

.. . . . . . . . . . .
"J Fortuna" wrote in message
...
I have a cochleanthes amazonica which I am still trying to understand (so
far not doing all that well). It came in a clear pot, and it has a bunch

of
moss that is growing on top of the medium and also on some of the roots.

It
came with this moss when I bought it from a vendor. Is this moss harmful

to
it, or is it ok to leave it there? If it is harmful, what should I do

about
it?

Thanks,
Joanna




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Old 27-01-2004, 03:07 PM
Wendy
 
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Default moss on cochleanthes roots?

Just guessing Joanna, but moss is a natural element so I would say no?????
Also, my mentor grows paphiopedilums & his pots are full of moss.
Will ask him.
--
Cheers Wendy
Remove PETERPAN for email reply


"J Fortuna" wrote in message
...
: I have a cochleanthes amazonica which I am still trying to understand (so
: far not doing all that well). It came in a clear pot, and it has a bunch
of
: moss that is growing on top of the medium and also on some of the roots.
It
: came with this moss when I bought it from a vendor. Is this moss harmful
to
: it, or is it ok to leave it there? If it is harmful, what should I do
about
: it?
:
: Thanks,
: Joanna
:
:


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Old 27-01-2004, 06:47 PM
Rob Halgren
 
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Default moss on cochleanthes roots?

Wendy wrote:

Just guessing Joanna, but moss is a natural element so I would say no?????
Also, my mentor grows paphiopedilums & his pots are full of moss.
Will ask him.


Moss (the short fuzzy kind with the little spore stalks) is more of a
tag along than an actual medium. It is ubiquitous on the forest floors,
and anywhere where it is damp and humid, with a bit of light. That is
pretty much idea conditions for many orchid species. Spores float
around in the air, and germinate wherever conditions are good. You may
also have a little live sphagnum moss growing, but that is a bit less
likely.

So, you see that short moss (I'm sure there are dozens if not hundreds
of species) a lot in greenhouses, where conditions are optimal for moss
growth. You will also see green algae (on the walls, and sometimes on
the potting mix or outside of pots). I personally think that if you are
getting algae on your pots, you are probably watering too much, unless
it is a really water requiring species you are trying to grow. A little
green moss is ok.

Sphagnum moss is a different critter. It is harvested from peat bogs
(sphagnum breaks down into peat!) and then usually dried and compressed
into bales. That is the most common form you see used for potting
orchids. It works pretty well, but I'm told you can't really fertilize
a lot when using it as a medium, and that it breaks down after about a
year. You can also pot in fresh sphagnum, if you have a bog nearby.
Sphagnum is great for bringing plants back from 'the dead' (or almost).
It actually has antiseptic qualities and was used as a wound dressing up
until maybe WWI. Kind of neat.

Rob

--
Rob's Rules: http://www.msu.edu/~halgren
1) There is always room for one more orchid
2) There is always room for two more orchids
2a. See rule 1
3) When one has insufficient credit to purchase
more orchids, obtain more credit
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Old 27-01-2004, 06:50 PM
Rob Halgren
 
Posts: n/a
Default moss on cochleanthes roots?

Wendy wrote:

Just guessing Joanna, but moss is a natural element so I would say no?????
Also, my mentor grows paphiopedilums & his pots are full of moss.
Will ask him.


Moss (the short fuzzy kind with the little spore stalks) is more of a
tag along than an actual medium. It is ubiquitous on the forest floors,
and anywhere where it is damp and humid, with a bit of light. That is
pretty much idea conditions for many orchid species. Spores float
around in the air, and germinate wherever conditions are good. You may
also have a little live sphagnum moss growing, but that is a bit less
likely.

So, you see that short moss (I'm sure there are dozens if not hundreds
of species) a lot in greenhouses, where conditions are optimal for moss
growth. You will also see green algae (on the walls, and sometimes on
the potting mix or outside of pots). I personally think that if you are
getting algae on your pots, you are probably watering too much, unless
it is a really water requiring species you are trying to grow. A little
green moss is ok.

Sphagnum moss is a different critter. It is harvested from peat bogs
(sphagnum breaks down into peat!) and then usually dried and compressed
into bales. That is the most common form you see used for potting
orchids. It works pretty well, but I'm told you can't really fertilize
a lot when using it as a medium, and that it breaks down after about a
year. You can also pot in fresh sphagnum, if you have a bog nearby.
Sphagnum is great for bringing plants back from 'the dead' (or almost).
It actually has antiseptic qualities and was used as a wound dressing up
until maybe WWI. Kind of neat.

Rob

--
Rob's Rules: http://www.msu.edu/~halgren
1) There is always room for one more orchid
2) There is always room for two more orchids
2a. See rule 1
3) When one has insufficient credit to purchase
more orchids, obtain more credit


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Old 27-01-2004, 07:16 PM
Rob Halgren
 
Posts: n/a
Default moss on cochleanthes roots?

Wendy wrote:

Just guessing Joanna, but moss is a natural element so I would say no?????
Also, my mentor grows paphiopedilums & his pots are full of moss.
Will ask him.


Moss (the short fuzzy kind with the little spore stalks) is more of a
tag along than an actual medium. It is ubiquitous on the forest floors,
and anywhere where it is damp and humid, with a bit of light. That is
pretty much idea conditions for many orchid species. Spores float
around in the air, and germinate wherever conditions are good. You may
also have a little live sphagnum moss growing, but that is a bit less
likely.

So, you see that short moss (I'm sure there are dozens if not hundreds
of species) a lot in greenhouses, where conditions are optimal for moss
growth. You will also see green algae (on the walls, and sometimes on
the potting mix or outside of pots). I personally think that if you are
getting algae on your pots, you are probably watering too much, unless
it is a really water requiring species you are trying to grow. A little
green moss is ok.

Sphagnum moss is a different critter. It is harvested from peat bogs
(sphagnum breaks down into peat!) and then usually dried and compressed
into bales. That is the most common form you see used for potting
orchids. It works pretty well, but I'm told you can't really fertilize
a lot when using it as a medium, and that it breaks down after about a
year. You can also pot in fresh sphagnum, if you have a bog nearby.
Sphagnum is great for bringing plants back from 'the dead' (or almost).
It actually has antiseptic qualities and was used as a wound dressing up
until maybe WWI. Kind of neat.

Rob

--
Rob's Rules: http://www.msu.edu/~halgren
1) There is always room for one more orchid
2) There is always room for two more orchids
2a. See rule 1
3) When one has insufficient credit to purchase
more orchids, obtain more credit
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Old 27-01-2004, 07:16 PM
Rob Halgren
 
Posts: n/a
Default moss on cochleanthes roots?

Wendy wrote:

Just guessing Joanna, but moss is a natural element so I would say no?????
Also, my mentor grows paphiopedilums & his pots are full of moss.
Will ask him.


Moss (the short fuzzy kind with the little spore stalks) is more of a
tag along than an actual medium. It is ubiquitous on the forest floors,
and anywhere where it is damp and humid, with a bit of light. That is
pretty much idea conditions for many orchid species. Spores float
around in the air, and germinate wherever conditions are good. You may
also have a little live sphagnum moss growing, but that is a bit less
likely.

So, you see that short moss (I'm sure there are dozens if not hundreds
of species) a lot in greenhouses, where conditions are optimal for moss
growth. You will also see green algae (on the walls, and sometimes on
the potting mix or outside of pots). I personally think that if you are
getting algae on your pots, you are probably watering too much, unless
it is a really water requiring species you are trying to grow. A little
green moss is ok.

Sphagnum moss is a different critter. It is harvested from peat bogs
(sphagnum breaks down into peat!) and then usually dried and compressed
into bales. That is the most common form you see used for potting
orchids. It works pretty well, but I'm told you can't really fertilize
a lot when using it as a medium, and that it breaks down after about a
year. You can also pot in fresh sphagnum, if you have a bog nearby.
Sphagnum is great for bringing plants back from 'the dead' (or almost).
It actually has antiseptic qualities and was used as a wound dressing up
until maybe WWI. Kind of neat.

Rob

--
Rob's Rules: http://www.msu.edu/~halgren
1) There is always room for one more orchid
2) There is always room for two more orchids
2a. See rule 1
3) When one has insufficient credit to purchase
more orchids, obtain more credit
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Old 27-01-2004, 11:11 PM
J Fortuna
 
Posts: n/a
Default moss on cochleanthes roots?

Thanks for reassuring me. I thought that the moss was probably ok, but I
figured it was better to ask about it ("better safe than sorry"). By the way
I also posted a photo of this moss to abpo, and Al confirmed that based on
the photo, it looks ok.
Joanna




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