#1   Report Post  
Old 14-11-2002, 01:58 AM
David Hare-Scott
 
Posts: n/a
Default Explanation of "edge effects"

I read in various places that the geometry and planting layout of a
permaculture garden should exploit "edge effects". The explanation
tends to be along the lines that where one planting meets another you
get an edge and at edges good things happen so therefore you should do
this.

What I haven't got yet is the detail of:
- what these good things at edges are
- very importantly why they happen and
- how significant the effects are.

I am not trolling for an argument - I really want to understand. Can
anybody point me to a resource that explains?

David



  #2   Report Post  
Old 16-11-2002, 07:06 AM
Wesley Trotman
 
Posts: n/a
Default Explanation of "edge effects"

Dear David,

Good question, most people dont pay much attention to this place.

Graham Bell says: 'All patterns of occupation or behaviour have edges and
they offer a particularly rich envronment. This is because the edge of
anything is especially rich in species, supporting plants, animals and
activities from both its neighbouring areas, and also the species and
activities which only take place in that special zone.'

One good example is the intertidal zone on the sea shore. This is very rich
in species and energy.

Think about it and make a list. One not often thought about is that between
land and air. How about night and day.?

The edge between forrest and cleared areas can be quite a bit warmer due to
the edge of the forrest catching the wind which moves the leaves and
branches and the friction heats the trees up. So here is and energising
factor at an edge.

Can we make a list here?

All the best
wes
David Hare-Scott wrote in message
u...
I read in various places that the geometry and planting layout of a
permaculture garden should exploit "edge effects". The explanation
tends to be along the lines that where one planting meets another you
get an edge and at edges good things happen so therefore you should do
this.

What I haven't got yet is the detail of:
- what these good things at edges are
- very importantly why they happen and
- how significant the effects are.

I am not trolling for an argument - I really want to understand. Can
anybody point me to a resource that explains?

David




  #3   Report Post  
Old 16-11-2002, 07:06 AM
Wesley Trotman
 
Posts: n/a
Default Explanation of "edge effects"

Dear David,

Good question, most people dont pay much attention to this place.

Graham Bell says: 'All patterns of occupation or behaviour have edges and
they offer a particularly rich envronment. This is because the edge of
anything is especially rich in species, supporting plants, animals and
activities from both its neighbouring areas, and also the species and
activities which only take place in that special zone.'

One good example is the intertidal zone on the sea shore. This is very rich
in species and energy.

Think about it and make a list. One not often thought about is that between
land and air. How about night and day.?

The edge between forrest and cleared areas can be quite a bit warmer due to
the edge of the forrest catching the wind which moves the leaves and
branches and the friction heats the trees up. So here is and energising
factor at an edge.

Can we make a list here?

All the best
wes
David Hare-Scott wrote in message
u...
I read in various places that the geometry and planting layout of a
permaculture garden should exploit "edge effects". The explanation
tends to be along the lines that where one planting meets another you
get an edge and at edges good things happen so therefore you should do
this.

What I haven't got yet is the detail of:
- what these good things at edges are
- very importantly why they happen and
- how significant the effects are.

I am not trolling for an argument - I really want to understand. Can
anybody point me to a resource that explains?

David




  #4   Report Post  
Old 17-11-2002, 10:00 PM
Graham Burnett
 
Posts: n/a
Default Explanation of "edge effects"


"Wesley Trotman" wrote in message
.. .
Dear David,

Good question, most people dont pay much attention to this place.

Graham Bell says: 'All patterns of occupation or behaviour have edges and
they offer a particularly rich envronment. This is because the edge of
anything is especially rich in species, supporting plants, animals and
activities from both its neighbouring areas, and also the species and
activities which only take place in that special zone.'

One good example is the intertidal zone on the sea shore. This is very

rich
in species and energy.

Think about it and make a list. One not often thought about is that

between
land and air. How about night and day.?

The edge between forrest and cleared areas can be quite a bit warmer due

to
the edge of the forrest catching the wind which moves the leaves and
branches and the friction heats the trees up. So here is and energising
factor at an edge.

Can we make a list here?


Probably two of the most valuable edges of all in Permculture are those
which occur when people come together and when ideas come together...

Cheers Graham



  #5   Report Post  
Old 17-11-2002, 10:00 PM
Graham Burnett
 
Posts: n/a
Default Explanation of "edge effects"


"Wesley Trotman" wrote in message
.. .
Dear David,

Good question, most people dont pay much attention to this place.

Graham Bell says: 'All patterns of occupation or behaviour have edges and
they offer a particularly rich envronment. This is because the edge of
anything is especially rich in species, supporting plants, animals and
activities from both its neighbouring areas, and also the species and
activities which only take place in that special zone.'

One good example is the intertidal zone on the sea shore. This is very

rich
in species and energy.

Think about it and make a list. One not often thought about is that

between
land and air. How about night and day.?

The edge between forrest and cleared areas can be quite a bit warmer due

to
the edge of the forrest catching the wind which moves the leaves and
branches and the friction heats the trees up. So here is and energising
factor at an edge.

Can we make a list here?


Probably two of the most valuable edges of all in Permculture are those
which occur when people come together and when ideas come together...

Cheers Graham





  #6   Report Post  
Old 19-11-2002, 12:21 PM
Janet Baraclough
 
Posts: n/a
Default Explanation of "edge effects"

The message
from "Graham Burnett" contains these words:

Probably two of the most valuable edges of all in Permculture are those
which occur when people come together and when ideas come together...


Then the London Underground at rush hour must be the world's greatest
untapped resource of energy and intelligence, so it's just a matter of
time before America claims it's full of terrorists, arranges some
pretext to close it, and demands our leader's total obedience and
subservience.

....oh dear....

Janet

  #7   Report Post  
Old 19-11-2002, 12:21 PM
Janet Baraclough
 
Posts: n/a
Default Explanation of "edge effects"

The message
from "Graham Burnett" contains these words:

Probably two of the most valuable edges of all in Permculture are those
which occur when people come together and when ideas come together...


Then the London Underground at rush hour must be the world's greatest
untapped resource of energy and intelligence, so it's just a matter of
time before America claims it's full of terrorists, arranges some
pretext to close it, and demands our leader's total obedience and
subservience.

....oh dear....

Janet

  #8   Report Post  
Old 24-11-2002, 01:11 PM
Ute Bohnsack
 
Posts: n/a
Default Explanation of "edge effects"

Hi David,
if you type "edge effect" ecology (without the ) in www.google.com
you'll get a lot of references and examples.
If you have Powerpoint you can download this presentation on Landscape
Ecology
http://www.ouc.bc.ca/biol/Biol203/Ho...Landscapes.ppt

HTH
Ute


David Hare-Scott wrote:

I read in various places that the geometry and planting layout of a
permaculture garden should exploit "edge effects". The explanation
tends to be along the lines that where one planting meets another you
get an edge and at edges good things happen so therefore you should do
this.

What I haven't got yet is the detail of:
- what these good things at edges are
- very importantly why they happen and
- how significant the effects are.

I am not trolling for an argument - I really want to understand. Can
anybody point me to a resource that explains?

David

  #9   Report Post  
Old 24-11-2002, 01:11 PM
Ute Bohnsack
 
Posts: n/a
Default Explanation of "edge effects"

Hi David,
if you type "edge effect" ecology (without the ) in www.google.com
you'll get a lot of references and examples.
If you have Powerpoint you can download this presentation on Landscape
Ecology
http://www.ouc.bc.ca/biol/Biol203/Ho...Landscapes.ppt

HTH
Ute


David Hare-Scott wrote:

I read in various places that the geometry and planting layout of a
permaculture garden should exploit "edge effects". The explanation
tends to be along the lines that where one planting meets another you
get an edge and at edges good things happen so therefore you should do
this.

What I haven't got yet is the detail of:
- what these good things at edges are
- very importantly why they happen and
- how significant the effects are.

I am not trolling for an argument - I really want to understand. Can
anybody point me to a resource that explains?

David

  #10   Report Post  
Old 24-11-2002, 01:18 PM
MDHJWH
 
Posts: n/a
Default Explanation of "edge effects"

"Graham Burnett" wrote in message ...
"Wesley Trotman" wrote in message
.. .
Dear David,

Good question, most people dont pay much attention to this place.

Graham Bell says: 'All patterns of occupation or behaviour have edges and
they offer a particularly rich envronment. This is because the edge of
anything is especially rich in species, supporting plants, animals and
activities from both its neighbouring areas, and also the species and
activities which only take place in that special zone.'

One good example is the intertidal zone on the sea shore. This is very

rich
in species and energy.

Think about it and make a list. One not often thought about is that

between
land and air. How about night and day.?


But coming together so seldom on this news group we observe a series
of isolated oasis abandoned in a desert with no edge.

Ayn Marx

The edge between forrest and cleared areas can be quite a bit warmer due

to
the edge of the forrest catching the wind which moves the leaves and
branches and the friction heats the trees up. So here is and energising
factor at an edge.

Can we make a list here?


Probably two of the most valuable edges of all in Permculture are those
which occur when people come together and when ideas come together...

Cheers Graham



  #11   Report Post  
Old 24-11-2002, 01:18 PM
MDHJWH
 
Posts: n/a
Default Explanation of "edge effects"

"Graham Burnett" wrote in message ...
"Wesley Trotman" wrote in message
.. .
Dear David,

Good question, most people dont pay much attention to this place.

Graham Bell says: 'All patterns of occupation or behaviour have edges and
they offer a particularly rich envronment. This is because the edge of
anything is especially rich in species, supporting plants, animals and
activities from both its neighbouring areas, and also the species and
activities which only take place in that special zone.'

One good example is the intertidal zone on the sea shore. This is very

rich
in species and energy.

Think about it and make a list. One not often thought about is that

between
land and air. How about night and day.?


But coming together so seldom on this news group we observe a series
of isolated oasis abandoned in a desert with no edge.

Ayn Marx

The edge between forrest and cleared areas can be quite a bit warmer due

to
the edge of the forrest catching the wind which moves the leaves and
branches and the friction heats the trees up. So here is and energising
factor at an edge.

Can we make a list here?


Probably two of the most valuable edges of all in Permculture are those
which occur when people come together and when ideas come together...

Cheers Graham



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