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Old 19-10-2003, 04:02 PM
Alan Holmes
 
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Default Tomatoes and cold weather?


Still got lots of outdoor tomatoes on the plants, but the weather is
beginning to get very cold.

I wouldn't like to lose any of those tomatoes which are left, so is it
too early to remove them from the plants, and if I do how do I store
them and encourage those not yet ripe to ripen?

Alan
--
Reply to alan(at)windsor-berks(dot)freeserve(dot)co(dot)uk




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Old 19-10-2003, 04:22 PM
Robert
 
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Default Tomatoes and cold weather?

: Still got lots of outdoor tomatoes on the plants, but the weather is
: beginning to get very cold.
:
: I wouldn't like to lose any of those tomatoes which are left, so is it
: too early to remove them from the plants, and if I do how do I store
: them and encourage those not yet ripe to ripen?
:
: Alan

I should have brought them in by now. A ripe tomato or banana next to them
in a warmish place will encourage the ripening


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Old 19-10-2003, 04:32 PM
martin
 
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Default Tomatoes and cold weather?

On Sun, 19 Oct 2003 15:21:53 +0000 (UTC), "Robert"
wrote:

: Still got lots of outdoor tomatoes on the plants, but the weather is
: beginning to get very cold.
:
: I wouldn't like to lose any of those tomatoes which are left, so is it
: too early to remove them from the plants, and if I do how do I store
: them and encourage those not yet ripe to ripen?
:
: Alan

I should have brought them in by now. A ripe tomato or banana next to them
in a warmish place will encourage the ripening


will just make them change colour?

--
Martin
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Old 19-10-2003, 05:42 PM
Arthur
 
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Default Tomatoes and cold weather?


"Alan Holmes" wrote in message
...

Still got lots of outdoor tomatoes on the plants, but the weather is
beginning to get very cold.

I wouldn't like to lose any of those tomatoes which are left, so is it
too early to remove them from the plants, and if I do how do I store
them and encourage those not yet ripe to ripen?

Alan
--


Alan,
Don't pick the fruit. It will encourage then to rot at the top.

Cut off each truss with the fruit still in place. Lay them on a windowsill
where they will catch the maximum sun during the day, lift them away from
the window at night to keep them away from cold draughts. I did this with
mine a few weeks ago and have ripened well.

Do it right away. If they have already been frosted, it will be too late.

- Arthur


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Old 20-10-2003, 07:02 PM
David W.E. Roberts
 
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Default Tomatoes and cold weather?


"Alan Holmes" wrote in message
...

Still got lots of outdoor tomatoes on the plants, but the weather is
beginning to get very cold.

I wouldn't like to lose any of those tomatoes which are left, so is it
too early to remove them from the plants, and if I do how do I store
them and encourage those not yet ripe to ripen?


The time to bring them in is about two hours before the first frost of the
year.

Up to then they will still ripen on the plant if they get any sun.

Seriously green tomatoes don't always ripen when you bring them in.

After the first frost the plant goes to green mush and the tomatoes go all
brown and yucky.

As to when the first frost will be.........

Cheers
Dave R

P.S. you could always bring in about 50% of them - the largest and nearest
to ripening. Then let the remainder have a chance to grow a little on the
warm days and gamble you can get the rest in before a frost.




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Old 20-10-2003, 07:02 PM
The Hoopeses
 
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Default Tomatoes and cold weather?



David W.E. Roberts wrote:
"Alan Holmes" wrote in message
...

Still got lots of outdoor tomatoes on the plants, but the weather is
beginning to get very cold.

I wouldn't like to lose any of those tomatoes which are left, so is it
too early to remove them from the plants, and if I do how do I store
them and encourage those not yet ripe to ripen?



The time to bring them in is about two hours before the first frost of the
year.

Up to then they will still ripen on the plant if they get any sun.

Seriously green tomatoes don't always ripen when you bring them in.

After the first frost the plant goes to green mush and the tomatoes go all
brown and yucky.

As to when the first frost will be.........

Cheers
Dave R

P.S. you could always bring in about 50% of them - the largest and nearest
to ripening. Then let the remainder have a chance to grow a little on the
warm days and gamble you can get the rest in before a frost.


We had our first frost a few days ago here in southern Germany. The
more tender plants are now decorating the front entryway.

Back in Ohio we would bring in any green tomatoes, with vine still
attached, if possible. The preferred storage method was in a cardboard
box top lined with newspaper. Whenever possible, we'd sit them in the
sun during the daylight hours. Those that never ripened would be made
into the classic fried green tomatoes.

-
Al

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Old 23-10-2003, 10:02 PM
David W.E. Roberts
 
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Default Tomatoes and cold weather?


"The Hoopeses" wrote in message
...
snip
We had our first frost a few days ago here in southern Germany. The
more tender plants are now decorating the front entryway.

Back in Ohio we would bring in any green tomatoes, with vine still
attached, if possible. The preferred storage method was in a cardboard
box top lined with newspaper. Whenever possible, we'd sit them in the
sun during the daylight hours. Those that never ripened would be made
into the classic fried green tomatoes.


Still frost free in coastal Suffolk - although it is turning colder.

The tomato jungle is still ripening, and there are hundreds (thousands?) of
green tomatoes still developing.
The plants are still flowering, although I don't know if they are still
setting fruit.
Still gets up to 16C or more in the shade when the sun shines.
T-shirt weather in the sun on the back patio, so on sunny days the plants
must be getting plenty of warmth and sun.

I wonder when the first frost will be?
Could we make it to mid-November (or even December) with fresh home grown
tomatoes?

Buy your tickets for the sweepstake here :-)

Dave R


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Old 24-10-2003, 12:02 AM
Janet Baraclough
 
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Default Tomatoes and cold weather?

The message
from "David W.E. Roberts" contains these words:


Still frost free in coastal Suffolk - although it is turning colder.

(snip)
I wonder when the first frost will be?
Could we make it to mid-November (or even December) with fresh home grown
tomatoes?


Buy your tickets for the sweepstake here :-)


We've not yet had a frost at garden and sea level, though there was
snow on the mountains yesterday morning and the coldest wind so far.Last
weekend I went to collect seaweed on a pebble beach and found a tomato
plant growing there. It had one truss of small green fruit so I cut it
off and have it on the windowsill to see if they ripen.

Janet. (Isle of Arran)


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Old 24-10-2003, 10:13 AM
David W.E. Roberts
 
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Default Tomatoes and cold weather?


"Janet Baraclough" wrote in message
...
The message
from "David W.E. Roberts" contains these words:


Still frost free in coastal Suffolk - although it is turning colder.

(snip)
I wonder when the first frost will be?
Could we make it to mid-November (or even December) with fresh home

grown
tomatoes?


Buy your tickets for the sweepstake here :-)


We've not yet had a frost at garden and sea level, though there was
snow on the mountains yesterday morning and the coldest wind so far.Last
weekend I went to collect seaweed on a pebble beach and found a tomato
plant growing there. It had one truss of small green fruit so I cut it
off and have it on the windowsill to see if they ripen.


Forecast is down to 1C tonight so there is a risk of frost.
To pick or not to pick, that is the question....

On the topic of unusual places to find tomato plants, there was one growing
between the tracks at Sherringham station with a good crop of green tomatoes
about a month ago. The station is at the end of the line so no trains
passing through at speed.
As to where the seed came from....:-)

Cheers
Dave R


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Old 01-11-2003, 01:02 PM
David W.E. Roberts
 
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Default Tomatoes and cold weather?

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"David W.E. Roberts" wrote in message
...

"Janet Baraclough" wrote in message
...
The message
from "David W.E. Roberts" contains these words:


Still frost free in coastal Suffolk - although it is turning colder.

(snip)
I wonder when the first frost will be?
Could we make it to mid-November (or even December) with fresh home

grown
tomatoes?


Buy your tickets for the sweepstake here :-)


We've not yet had a frost at garden and sea level, though there was
snow on the mountains yesterday morning and the coldest wind so far.Last
weekend I went to collect seaweed on a pebble beach and found a tomato
plant growing there. It had one truss of small green fruit so I cut it
off and have it on the windowsill to see if they ripen.


Forecast is down to 1C tonight so there is a risk of frost.
To pick or not to pick, that is the question....


Took some of my own advice (not always a good move) and picked a good number
of green tomatoes, mainly still on the truss.
There was no frost, and the outdoor plants are still flowering and setting
fruit!
Now watching the 'ripening race' between picked and unpicked tomatoes and
the unpicked seem to be winning.
So I will persevere with the outdoor plants until they get hit by a frost.




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Old 01-11-2003, 05:13 PM
Philip
 
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Default Tomatoes and cold weather?

There was no frost, and the outdoor plants are still flowering and setting
fruit!
Now watching the 'ripening race' between picked and unpicked tomatoes and
the unpicked seem to be winning.
So I will persevere with the outdoor plants until they get hit by a frost.


Where do you live? Here in suburban Surrey we have had enough frost to kill
the Pumpkin, all the Toms are badly frosted.

I wonder if we are in for a cold winter. The frosts seem to have started
earlier.


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Old 01-11-2003, 05:13 PM
David W.E. Roberts
 
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Default Tomatoes and cold weather?


"Philip" wrote in message
.. .
There was no frost, and the outdoor plants are still flowering and

setting
fruit!
Now watching the 'ripening race' between picked and unpicked tomatoes

and
the unpicked seem to be winning.
So I will persevere with the outdoor plants until they get hit by a

frost.


Where do you live? Here in suburban Surrey we have had enough frost to

kill
the Pumpkin, all the Toms are badly frosted.

I wonder if we are in for a cold winter. The frosts seem to have started
earlier.


Sunny seaside Suffolk - the sea seems to buffer us from the colder weather,
it can be 4C colder or more 10 miles inland.

We do get frosts - just not as early or as often as other places.


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Old 02-11-2003, 02:42 PM
Rhiannon S
 
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Default Tomatoes and cold weather?

Subject: Tomatoes and cold weather?
From: "Philip"
Date: 01/11/2003 17:04 GMT Standard Time
Message-id:

There was no frost, and the outdoor plants are still flowering and setting
fruit!
Now watching the 'ripening race' between picked and unpicked tomatoes and
the unpicked seem to be winning.
So I will persevere with the outdoor plants until they get hit by a frost.


Where do you live? Here in suburban Surrey we have had enough frost to kill
the Pumpkin, all the Toms are badly frosted.

I wonder if we are in for a cold winter. The frosts seem to have started
earlier.


I know that a couple of weeks ago it was snowing on the M8 outside glasgow. I
think that was some kind of record for these parts.
--
Rhiannon
http://www.livejournal.com/users/rhiannon_s/
Q: how many witches does it take to change a lightbulb?
A: depends on what you want it changed into!
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Old 02-11-2003, 03:02 PM
Rhiannon S
 
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Default Tomatoes and cold weather?

and Tim Henman is winning in the final in Paris...
--
Martin


The end times are truly upon us, all we need is the prince of evil to
rise...wait didn't Michael Howard get crowned tory leader?
--
Rhiannon
http://www.livejournal.com/users/rhiannon_s/
Q: how many witches does it take to change a lightbulb?
A: depends on what you want it changed into!


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