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Covering rhododendrons with fleece jacket (or not) ?



 
 
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  #1  
Old 19-10-2005, 05:08 PM
Mike
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Default Covering rhododendrons with fleece jacket (or not) ?

Hello,

I have several rhododendrons in my garden up against a fence which gets
the full force of northerly winds.

The plants look look fine at present and normally I leave them alone
to face the Winter and look none the worse in the following Spring.

This year I understand that the weather may be colder and I am thinking
of placing a "polypropylene fleece" over them.

Would this be a good idea ?
Thanks.

Mike.

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  #2  
Old 19-10-2005, 06:02 PM
Mike Lyle
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Default Covering rhododendrons with fleece jacket (or not) ?

Mike wrote:
Hello,

I have several rhododendrons in my garden up against a fence which
gets the full force of northerly winds.

The plants look look fine at present and normally I leave them
alone to face the Winter and look none the worse in the following
Spring.

This year I understand that the weather may be colder and I am
thinking of placing a "polypropylene fleece" over them.

Would this be a good idea ?
Thanks.

Mike.


Better rhodo growers than I may suggest otherwise, but I wouldn't do
anything. I used to have a huge old Ponticum and its offspring very
much exposed to the north in open country, and I never noticed it
taking any harm. It had grown to form a very big natural play-house
inside, and flowered very well. This was in relatively warm West
Wales, though, and I must stress that it was a plain Ponticum, not a
choice variety.

--
Mike.


  #3  
Old 19-10-2005, 07:06 PM
Jaques d'Alltrades
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Default Covering rhododendrons with fleece jacket (or not) ?

The message
from "Mike Lyle" contains these words:

Better rhodo growers than I may suggest otherwise, but I wouldn't do
anything. I used to have a huge old Ponticum and its offspring very
much exposed to the north in open country, and I never noticed it
taking any harm. It had grown to form a very big natural play-house
inside, and flowered very well. This was in relatively warm West
Wales, though, and I must stress that it was a plain Ponticum, not a
choice variety.


The grounds of Stornoway Castle used to be (maybe still is) a jungle of
rhododendron - and I mean jungle - the canopy was fifteen feet or more,
and while the Outer Hebrides has a generally mild climate, really cold
snaps are not unknown when the wind comes off the polar regions.

I'd go along with Mike, in every detail.

--
Rusty
horrid dot squeak snailything zetnet point co full-stop uk
http://www.users.zetnet.co.uk/hi-fi/
  #4  
Old 19-10-2005, 07:25 PM
Tumbleweed
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Default Covering rhododendrons with fleece jacket (or not) ?


"Mike" wrote in message
...
Hello,

I have several rhododendrons in my garden up against a fence which gets
the full force of northerly winds.

The plants look look fine at present and normally I leave them alone
to face the Winter and look none the worse in the following Spring.

This year I understand that the weather may be colder and I am thinking of
placing a "polypropylene fleece" over them.

Would this be a good idea ?
Thanks.

Mike.


IIRC they are native to the Himalaya's so I would suggest its not necessary
:-)

--
Tumbleweed

email replies not necessary but to contact use;
tumbleweednews at hotmail dot com


  #5  
Old 19-10-2005, 07:33 PM
Klara
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Default Covering rhododendrons with fleece jacket (or not) ?

In message , Jaques
d'Alltrades writes
Better rhodo growers than I may suggest otherwise, but I wouldn't do
anything. I used to have a huge old Ponticum and its offspring very
much exposed to the north in open country, and I never noticed it
taking any harm. It had grown to form a very big natural play-house
inside, and flowered very well. This was in relatively warm West
Wales, though, and I must stress that it was a plain Ponticum, not a
choice variety.


The grounds of Stornoway Castle used to be (maybe still is) a jungle of
rhododendron - and I mean jungle - the canopy was fifteen feet or more,
and while the Outer Hebrides has a generally mild climate, really cold
snaps are not unknown when the wind comes off the polar regions.

I'd go along with Mike, in every detail.


No one covers them in New York, and winters there are a lot colder than
here. They go a bit pointed - the leaves hang at a different, steeper
angle - but otherwise they're fine.

--
Klara, Gatwick basin
  #6  
Old 20-10-2005, 06:29 PM
Chris Hogg
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Default Covering rhododendrons with fleece jacket (or not) ?

On Wed, 19 Oct 2005 19:06:55 +0100, Jaques d'Alltrades
wrote:

The message
from "Mike Lyle" contains these words:

Better rhodo growers than I may suggest otherwise, but I wouldn't do
anything. I used to have a huge old Ponticum and its offspring very
much exposed to the north in open country, and I never noticed it
taking any harm. It had grown to form a very big natural play-house
inside, and flowered very well. This was in relatively warm West
Wales, though, and I must stress that it was a plain Ponticum, not a
choice variety.


The grounds of Stornoway Castle used to be (maybe still is) a jungle of
rhododendron - and I mean jungle - the canopy was fifteen feet or more,
and while the Outer Hebrides has a generally mild climate, really cold
snaps are not unknown when the wind comes off the polar regions.

I'd go along with Mike, in every detail.



I didn't see the OP's message, but very few rhodies need protection in
the UK. The few that are tender are generally the highly scented
types, usually flowering in early to mid summer.


--
Chris

E-mail: christopher[dot]hogg[at]virgin[dot]net
  #7  
Old 20-10-2005, 10:24 PM
compo
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Default Covering rhododendrons with fleece jacket (or not) ?

The message
from Mike contains these words:

The plants look look fine at present and normally I leave them alone
to face the Winter and look none the worse in the following Spring.



There are some fine Rhody specimens growing on the foothills of Scottish
mountains. These take the full force of our winter and still look good
in Springtime. Not absolutely sure but I think they are more prone to
wind damage than cold temperatures.

One could experiment by covering some plants and leaving others exposed.

--
Cheers,

Compo.
  #8  
Old 21-10-2005, 12:57 PM
michael adams
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Default Covering rhododendrons with fleece jacket (or not) ?


"Mike" wrote in message
...
Hello,

I have several rhododendrons in my garden up against a fence which gets
the full force of northerly winds.

The plants look look fine at present and normally I leave them alone
to face the Winter and look none the worse in the following Spring.

This year I understand that the weather may be colder and I am thinking
of placing a "polypropylene fleece" over them.

Would this be a good idea ?
Thanks.

Mike.


As with camellias, the buds of some early flowering varieties of
rhododendron can be damaged by frost, especially if this is followed
by the warmth of direct sunlight the following morning.

However for frost to develop requires fairly still air. Its doubtful
if frost could develop where there are consistent high winds.

Although saying that, on any still nights, any site against a fence
can be favourable for frost pockets to develop, owing to a lack
of air circulation.

So, much depends on the variety - whether its early flowering or not,
and location, as to whether its prone to frost or not on any
still nights that may occur.

The worst that can happen probably is to lose some of that
years flowers.


michael adams

....



 




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