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Old 19-07-2009, 02:56 PM
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Default Victoria plum tree

i have problem with my plum tree ,there is what looks like a silicon gel type substance oozing from the plums has anybody got any idea what it is and is it harmfull

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Old 20-07-2009, 11:35 AM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Posts: 509
Default Victoria plum tree

l bailes said:



i have problem with my plum tree ,there is what looks like a silicon gel
type substance oozing from the plums has anybody got any idea what it is
and is it harmfull


Some pest has been laying eggs on you plums. The wounds they made
are 'bleeding.'

Here in North America, I might suspect Plum curculio beetles (there
would be a small cut at the base of each bit of ooze) or another
weevil called the plum gouger. The eggs are laid under the skin of
the fruit, and the larvae burrow in to feed on the stone. (I don't
know if either of these pests has been exported.)

Oriental fruit moth is another possible culprit.

--
Pat in Plymouth MI

"So, it was all a dream."
"No dear, this is the dream, you're still in the cell."

email valid but not regularly monitored


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Old 25-07-2009, 09:26 AM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Posts: 110
Default Victoria plum tree

Pat Kiewicz wrote:
l bailes said:


i have problem with my plum tree ,there is what looks like a silicon gel
type substance oozing from the plums has anybody got any idea what it is
and is it harmfull


Some pest has been laying eggs on you plums. The wounds they made
are 'bleeding.'

Here in North America, I might suspect Plum curculio beetles (there
would be a small cut at the base of each bit of ooze) or another
weevil called the plum gouger. The eggs are laid under the skin of
the fruit, and the larvae burrow in to feed on the stone. (I don't
know if either of these pests has been exported.)

Oriental fruit moth is another possible culprit.

If it is Plum Curculio, the only thing I know that will knock it
out is Imidan.

Sherwin
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Old 25-07-2009, 06:53 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Dec 2008
Posts: 1,179
Default Victoria plum tree

In article ,
sherwin dubren wrote:

Pat Kiewicz wrote:
l bailes said:


i have problem with my plum tree ,there is what looks like a silicon gel
type substance oozing from the plums has anybody got any idea what it is
and is it harmfull


Some pest has been laying eggs on you plums. The wounds they made
are 'bleeding.'

Here in North America, I might suspect Plum curculio beetles (there
would be a small cut at the base of each bit of ooze) or another
weevil called the plum gouger. The eggs are laid under the skin of
the fruit, and the larvae burrow in to feed on the stone. (I don't
know if either of these pests has been exported.)

Oriental fruit moth is another possible culprit.

If it is Plum Curculio, the only thing I know that will knock it
out is Imidan.

Sherwin


If, if, if, if Sherwin wouldn't opine on the solution to a problem,
before he knows what it is (even then, it seems that the only answer he
has is to spay).

Are you sure the problem isn't Bacterial canker (Pseudomonas syringae
pv. morsprunorum and P. syringae pv. syringe) ?
http://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/profile...ial_canker.asp

Failing that, is there no botanist at a secondary school or university,
agricultural advisor, or nuseryman, to whom you could show your problem,
or perhaps ring up on the phone?

Could you post a picture of the problem?

And so that we understand each other, the "silicon like substance" is
exuding from the fruit or the tree?
--

- Billy

Racial injustice, war, urban blight, and environmental rape have a common denominator in our exploitative economic system.* ~Channing E. Phillips

Israeli Settlers Attack Palestinian Land
http://i2.democracynow.org/2009/7/22/headlines#7


http://i2.democracynow.org/2009/7/22/headlines#7


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Old 25-07-2009, 07:16 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Posts: 1,179
Default Victoria plum tree

In article ,
phorbin wrote:

In article ,
says...
Pat Kiewicz wrote:
l bailes said:


i have problem with my plum tree ,there is what looks like a silicon gel
type substance oozing from the plums has anybody got any idea what it is
and is it harmfull

Some pest has been laying eggs on you plums. The wounds they made
are 'bleeding.'

Here in North America, I might suspect Plum curculio beetles (there
would be a small cut at the base of each bit of ooze) or another
weevil called the plum gouger. The eggs are laid under the skin of
the fruit, and the larvae burrow in to feed on the stone. (I don't
know if either of these pests has been exported.)

Oriental fruit moth is another possible culprit.

If it is Plum Curculio, the only thing I know that will knock it
out is Imidan.


Which is particularly toxic to bees.

Bees are a consideration at any time and should be everyone's
consideration.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/World-Withou.../dp/0852650922

I posted the UK link because it came up first.


This from the manufacturer of Imdane W-70 site
http://www.gowanco.com/ProductInfo~p...an%2070-W.aspx

ACTIVE INGREDIENT: Phosmet % By Wt.
N-(Mercaptomethyl) phthalimide, S-(O,O-dimethyl
phosphorodithioate................................ .......................
.................................................. ....70.0%
OTHER
INGREDIENTS:...................................... .......................
.................................................. ........................
.................................................. ....30.0%
TOTAL 100.0%
KEEP OUT OF REACH OF CHILDREN
WARNING-AVISO
Si usted no entiende la etiqueta, busque a alguien para que se la
explique a usted en detalle. (If you do not understand the label, find
someone to
explain it to you in detail.)

FIRST AID
ORGANOPHOSPHATE
If inhaled Move person to fresh air.
If person is not breathing, call 911 or an ambulance, then give
artificial respiration, preferably by mouth-to-mouth, if
possible.
Call a poison control center or doctor for further treatment advice.
If on skin or clothing Take off contaminated clothing.
Rinse skin immediately with plenty of water for 15-20 minutes.
Call a poison control center or doctor for treatment advice.
If in eyes Hold eye open and rinse slowly and gently with water for
15-20 minutes.
Remove contact lenses, if present, after the first 5 minutes, then
continue rinsing eye.
Call a poison control center or doctor for treatment advice.
If swallowed Call a poison control center or doctor immediately for
treatment advice.
Have person sip a glass of water if able to swallow.
Do not induce vomiting unless told to do so by the poison control
center or doctor
Do not give anything by mouth to an unconscious person.
HOT LINE NUMBER
Have the product container or label with you when calling a poison
control center or doctor, or going for treatment. You may also contact
1-888-478-
0798 for emergency medical treatment information.
NOTE TO PHYSICIAN
This product is an organophosphate insecticide. If symptoms of
cholinesterase inhibition are present, atropine sulfate by injection is
antidotal. 2-PAM
is also antidotal and may be administered, but only in conjunction with
atropine.

PRECAUTIONARY STATEMENTS
HAZARDS TO HUMANS AND DOMESTIC ANIMALS
WARNING-AVISO
May be fatal if swallowed, inhaled, or absorbed through the skin. Do not
breathe dust or spray mist. Do not get in eyes, on skin, or on clothing.

PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT (PPE)
Some materials that are chemical-resistant to this product are Barrier
Laminate and Viton. If you want more options, follow the instructions
for
category H on an EPA chemical-resistance category selection chart.
Mixers, loaders, all other applicators and other handlers must wear:
Long-sleeved shirt and long pants
Socks and shoes
Chemical-resistant gloves for mixers and loaders, applicators using
hand held equipment
Chemical resistant apron for mixers and loaders
Chemical-Resistant headgear for overhead exposure.

USER SAFETY RECOMMENDATIONS
Users should:
? Wash hands before eating, drinking, chewing gum, using tobacco, or
using the toilet.
? Remove clothing/PPE immediately if pesticide gets inside. Then wash
thoroughly and put on clean clothing.
? Users should remove PPE immediately after handling this product. Wash
the outside of gloves before removing. As soon as possible, wash
thoroughly and change into clean clothing.

ENGINEERING CONTROLS
Water-soluble packets when used correctly qualify as a closed
mixing/loading system under the Worker Protection Standard for
Agricultural Pesticides
[40CFR 170.240(d)(4)].
Mixers and loaders using water-soluble packets must wear:
? Personal Protective Equipment identified above is required for
mixers/loaders
? Be provided and must have immediately available for use in an
emergency, such as a broken package, spill, or equipment breakdown:
1. Coveralls
2. Chemical-resistant footwear
3. A respirator with an organic-vapor removing cartridge with a
prefilter approved for pesticides (MSHA/NIOSH approval number
prefix TC-23C), or a canister approved for pesticides (MSMH/NIOSH
approval number prefix TC-14G), or a NIOSH-approved
respirator with an organic vapor (OV) cartridge or canister with any N,
R or P or He prefilter.
Pilots must use an enclosed cockpit in a manner than meets the
requirements listed in the Worker Protection Standard (WPS) for
agricultural pesticides
[40CFR 170.240(d)(6)].
Airblast, flaggers, and motorized groundboom applicators must in be in
fully enclosed cabs or, if not in fully enclosed cabs, applicators must
wear double-layer clothing, chemical-resistant headgear, respirator, and
chemical-resistant footwear and socks.
Applicators using airblast equipment and flaggers supporting aerial
applications must wear:
? Personal Protective Equipment identified above is required for
airblast applicators and flaggers.
? Be provided and must have immediately available for use in an
emergency when they must exit the cab in the treated area:
1. Coveralls
2. Chemical-resistant gloves
3. Chemical-resistant footwear
4. Chemical-resistant headgear if overhead exposure
Take off any PPE that was worn in the treated area before reentering the
cab; and store all such PPE in a chemical-resistant container, such as a
plastic bag, to prevent contamination of the inside of the cab.

ENVIRONMENTAL HAZARDS
This chemical can contaminate surface water through aerial and ground
spray applications. Under some conditions, it may also have a high
potential
for runoff into surface water after application. These include poorly
draining or wet soils with readily visible slopes toward adjacent
surface waters,
frequently flooded areas, areas overlaying extremely shallow ground
water, areas with in-field canals or ditches that drain to surface
water, areas not
separated from adjacent surface waters with vegetated filter strips, and
areas overlaying tile drainage systems that drain to surface water.
Limit spray
drift.
This pesticide is toxic to fish and aquatic invertebrates. Do not apply
directly to water or to areas where surface water is present or to
intertidal areas
below the mean high-water mark. Drift and runoff may be hazardous to
aquatic organisms in neighboring areas. Do not contaminate water when
disposing of equipment washwater or rinsate.
This product is highly toxic to bees exposed directly to treatment of
residues on crops. Do not apply this product or allow it to drift to
blooming crops or
weeds if bees are visiting the treatment area. Protective information
may be obtained from your cooperative Agricultural Extension Service.

USE PRECAUTIONS
Read all precautions and directions before using. Apply this product
only as specified on this label.
Imidan 70-W is compatible with most commonly used insecticides and
fungicides, but is incompatible with alkaline materials such as spray
lime, lime
sulfur, and Bordeaux mixtures. These materials will reduce the
insecticidal activity of Imidan 70-W.
Insecticidal activity may also be reduced when the spray solution has a
pH of 6 or higher. The pH of the spray solution must be corrected by
the addition of a suitable buffering or acidifying agent for optimum
insecticidal activity.

Of interest to neighbors.
**SPRAY DRIFT MANAGEMENT**
Avoiding spray drift is the responsibility of the applicator. The
interaction of many equipment and weather-related factors determine the
potential for
spray drift. The applicator is responsible for considering all these
factors when making decisions.
For ground boom applications:
Apply with nozzle height no more than 2 feet above the ground or crop
canopy, and when the wind speed is 10 mph or less at the application
site as
measured by an anemometer. Use a coarse or coarser spray (ASAE
definition 572) for standard nozzles, or a volume median diameter (VMD)
of 385
microns or greater for spinning atomizer nozzles.
For overhead chemigation:
Apply only when wind speed is 10 mph or less.
For airblast applications:
Do not direct spray above trees and vines, and turn off outward pointing
nozzles at row ends and when spraying the outer 2 rows. Apply only when
the
wind speed is10 mph or less at the application site.
--

- Billy

Racial injustice, war, urban blight, and environmental rape have a common denominator in our exploitative economic system.* ~Channing E. Phillips

Israeli Settlers Attack Palestinian Land
http://i2.democracynow.org/2009/7/22/headlines#7


http://i2.democracynow.org/2009/7/22/headlines#7
  #7   Report Post  
Old 25-07-2009, 07:20 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Dec 2008
Posts: 1,179
Default Victoria plum tree

In article ,
Billy wrote:

In article ,
phorbin wrote:

In article ,
says...
Pat Kiewicz wrote:
l bailes said:


i have problem with my plum tree ,there is what looks like a silicon
gel
type substance oozing from the plums has anybody got any idea what it
is
and is it harmfull

Some pest has been laying eggs on you plums. The wounds they made
are 'bleeding.'

Here in North America, I might suspect Plum curculio beetles (there
would be a small cut at the base of each bit of ooze) or another
weevil called the plum gouger. The eggs are laid under the skin of
the fruit, and the larvae burrow in to feed on the stone. (I don't
know if either of these pests has been exported.)

Oriental fruit moth is another possible culprit.

If it is Plum Curculio, the only thing I know that will knock it
out is Imidan.


Which is particularly toxic to bees.

Bees are a consideration at any time and should be everyone's
consideration.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/World-Withou.../dp/0852650922

I posted the UK link because it came up first.


This from the manufacturer of Imidan W-70 site
http://www.gowanco.com/ProductInfo~p...an%2070-W.aspx

ACTIVE INGREDIENT: Phosmet % By Wt.
N-(Mercaptomethyl) phthalimide, S-(O,O-dimethyl
phosphorodithioate................................ .......................
.................................................. ....70.0%
OTHER
INGREDIENTS:...................................... .......................
.................................................. ........................
.................................................. ....30.0%
TOTAL 100.0%
KEEP OUT OF REACH OF CHILDREN
WARNING-AVISO
Si usted no entiende la etiqueta, busque a alguien para que se la
explique a usted en detalle. (If you do not understand the label, find
someone to
explain it to you in detail.)

FIRST AID
ORGANOPHOSPHATE
If inhaled Move person to fresh air.
If person is not breathing, call 911 or an ambulance, then give
artificial respiration, preferably by mouth-to-mouth, if
possible.
Call a poison control center or doctor for further treatment advice.
If on skin or clothing Take off contaminated clothing.
Rinse skin immediately with plenty of water for 15-20 minutes.
Call a poison control center or doctor for treatment advice.
If in eyes Hold eye open and rinse slowly and gently with water for
15-20 minutes.
Remove contact lenses, if present, after the first 5 minutes, then
continue rinsing eye.
Call a poison control center or doctor for treatment advice.
If swallowed Call a poison control center or doctor immediately for
treatment advice.
Have person sip a glass of water if able to swallow.
Do not induce vomiting unless told to do so by the poison control
center or doctor
Do not give anything by mouth to an unconscious person.
HOT LINE NUMBER
Have the product container or label with you when calling a poison
control center or doctor, or going for treatment. You may also contact
1-888-478-
0798 for emergency medical treatment information.
NOTE TO PHYSICIAN
This product is an organophosphate insecticide. If symptoms of
cholinesterase inhibition are present, atropine sulfate by injection is
antidotal. 2-PAM
is also antidotal and may be administered, but only in conjunction with
atropine.

PRECAUTIONARY STATEMENTS
HAZARDS TO HUMANS AND DOMESTIC ANIMALS
WARNING-AVISO
May be fatal if swallowed, inhaled, or absorbed through the skin. Do not
breathe dust or spray mist. Do not get in eyes, on skin, or on clothing.

PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT (PPE)
Some materials that are chemical-resistant to this product are Barrier
Laminate and Viton. If you want more options, follow the instructions
for
category H on an EPA chemical-resistance category selection chart.
Mixers, loaders, all other applicators and other handlers must wear:
Long-sleeved shirt and long pants
Socks and shoes
Chemical-resistant gloves for mixers and loaders, applicators using
hand held equipment
Chemical resistant apron for mixers and loaders
Chemical-Resistant headgear for overhead exposure.

USER SAFETY RECOMMENDATIONS
Users should:
Wash hands before eating, drinking, chewing gum, using tobacco, or
using the toilet.
Remove clothing/PPE immediately if pesticide gets inside. Then wash
thoroughly and put on clean clothing.
Users should remove PPE immediately after handling this product. Wash
the outside of gloves before removing. As soon as possible, wash
thoroughly and change into clean clothing.

ENGINEERING CONTROLS
Water-soluble packets when used correctly qualify as a closed
mixing/loading system under the Worker Protection Standard for
Agricultural Pesticides
[40CFR 170.240(d)(4)].
Mixers and loaders using water-soluble packets must wear:
Personal Protective Equipment identified above is required for
mixers/loaders
Be provided and must have immediately available for use in an
emergency, such as a broken package, spill, or equipment breakdown:
1. Coveralls
2. Chemical-resistant footwear
3. A respirator with an organic-vapor removing cartridge with a
prefilter approved for pesticides (MSHA/NIOSH approval number
prefix TC-23C), or a canister approved for pesticides (MSMH/NIOSH
approval number prefix TC-14G), or a NIOSH-approved
respirator with an organic vapor (OV) cartridge or canister with any N,
R or P or He prefilter.
Pilots must use an enclosed cockpit in a manner than meets the
requirements listed in the Worker Protection Standard (WPS) for
agricultural pesticides
[40CFR 170.240(d)(6)].
Airblast, flaggers, and motorized groundboom applicators must in be in
fully enclosed cabs or, if not in fully enclosed cabs, applicators must
wear double-layer clothing, chemical-resistant headgear, respirator, and
chemical-resistant footwear and socks.
Applicators using airblast equipment and flaggers supporting aerial
applications must wear:
Personal Protective Equipment identified above is required for airblast
applicators and flaggers.
Be provided and must have immediately available for use in an emergency
when they must exit the cab in the treated area:
1. Coveralls
2. Chemical-resistant gloves
3. Chemical-resistant footwear
4. Chemical-resistant headgear if overhead exposure
Take off any PPE that was worn in the treated area before reentering the
cab; and store all such PPE in a chemical-resistant container, such as a
plastic bag, to prevent contamination of the inside of the cab.

ENVIRONMENTAL HAZARDS
This chemical can contaminate surface water through aerial and ground
spray applications. Under some conditions, it may also have a high
potential
for runoff into surface water after application. These include poorly
draining or wet soils with readily visible slopes toward adjacent
surface waters,
frequently flooded areas, areas overlaying extremely shallow ground
water, areas with in-field canals or ditches that drain to surface
water, areas not
separated from adjacent surface waters with vegetated filter strips, and
areas overlaying tile drainage systems that drain to surface water.
Limit spray
drift.
This pesticide is toxic to fish and aquatic invertebrates. Do not apply
directly to water or to areas where surface water is present or to
intertidal areas
below the mean high-water mark. Drift and runoff may be hazardous to
aquatic organisms in neighboring areas. Do not contaminate water when
disposing of equipment washwater or rinsate.
This product is highly toxic to bees exposed directly to treatment of
residues on crops. Do not apply this product or allow it to drift to
blooming crops or
weeds if bees are visiting the treatment area. Protective information
may be obtained from your cooperative Agricultural Extension Service.

USE PRECAUTIONS
Read all precautions and directions before using. Apply this product
only as specified on this label.
Imidan 70-W is compatible with most commonly used insecticides and
fungicides, but is incompatible with alkaline materials such as spray
lime, lime
sulfur, and Bordeaux mixtures. These materials will reduce the
insecticidal activity of Imidan 70-W.
Insecticidal activity may also be reduced when the spray solution has a
pH of 6 or higher. The pH of the spray solution must be corrected by
the addition of a suitable buffering or acidifying agent for optimum
insecticidal activity.

Of interest to neighbors.
**SPRAY DRIFT MANAGEMENT**
Avoiding spray drift is the responsibility of the applicator. The
interaction of many equipment and weather-related factors determine the
potential for
spray drift. The applicator is responsible for considering all these
factors when making decisions.
For ground boom applications:
Apply with nozzle height no more than 2 feet above the ground or crop
canopy, and when the wind speed is 10 mph or less at the application
site as
measured by an anemometer. Use a coarse or coarser spray (ASAE
definition 572) for standard nozzles, or a volume median diameter (VMD)
of 385
microns or greater for spinning atomizer nozzles.
For overhead chemigation:
Apply only when wind speed is 10 mph or less.
For airblast applications:
Do not direct spray above trees and vines, and turn off outward pointing
nozzles at row ends and when spraying the outer 2 rows. Apply only when
the
wind speed is10 mph or less at the application site.
--

- Billy

Racial injustice, war, urban blight, and environmental rape have a common denominator in our exploitative economic system.* ~Channing E. Phillips

Israeli Settlers Attack Palestinian Land
http://i2.democracynow.org/2009/7/22/headlines#7


http://i2.democracynow.org/2009/7/22/headlines#7
  #8   Report Post  
Old 20-01-2017, 03:19 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Jan 2017
Posts: 1
Default Victoria plum tree

On Sunday, July 19, 2009 at 6:56:22 PM UTC+5, l bailes wrote:
i have problem with my plum tree ,there is what looks like a silicon gel
type substance oozing from the plums has anybody got any idea what it is
and is it harmfull




--
l bailes


Sorry, Bailes, i might not be so helpful but I got a question of my own if anyone could help me out. I have around 200 victoria plum trees they must be around 7 years old but from last 3 years, not a single fruit can be seen even though am doing regular seasonal pruning watering and fertiliser. Please help beside if any one could share some literature about victoria plum growing that will be gr8

Sajjad
  #9   Report Post  
Old 20-01-2017, 07:20 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: May 2014
Posts: 804
Default Victoria plum tree

On 1/20/2017 9:19 AM, wrote:
On Sunday, July 19, 2009 at 6:56:22 PM UTC+5, l bailes wrote:
i have problem with my plum tree ,there is what looks like a silicon gel
type substance oozing from the plums has anybody got any idea what it is
and is it harmfull




--
l bailes


Sorry, Bailes, i might not be so helpful but I got a question of my own if anyone could help me out. I have around 200 victoria plum trees they must be around 7 years old but from last 3 years, not a single fruit can be seen even though am doing regular seasonal pruning watering and fertiliser. Please help beside if any one could share some literature about victoria plum growing that will be gr8

Sajjad

I'm not familiar with the Victoria plum but all fruit trees need
pollinators. We have hundreds of bee hives nearby and our fruit trees
are well pollinated.

If there are no pollinators you might invite a bee keeper to put a few
hives in your fruit trees area. Might even be nice enough to give you
some of the honey.

Bailes, looks like you have insects or birds pecking or chewing on your
plums. Growing fruit does attract such pests, you might have to net the
tree or put flashy dingle dangles on the limbs to frighten the birds. If
it's insects you will have to spray.


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