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Old 28-06-2003, 08:44 AM
Joanne
 
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Default Tomato problems: potato leaf vs, regular leaf (cut leaf?)

Another thread about tomatoes got me thinking. Is there a difference
to the types of problems faced by tomatoes with "potato" leaves vs.
those with the more common "cut" leaves?

I'm possitive that they have different enemies and I'm sure that the
back part of my brain knows what they are but I can't recall at this
moment, so I thought that a refresher was inorder.

Thanks for your help!

jcm
Toronto, Ontario
Canadian zone 5b, don't know my U.S. zone equivilant.
Thanks to global warming it's bloody hot here!

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Old 30-06-2003, 02:32 PM
Mike Stevenson
 
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Default Tomato problems: potato leaf vs, regular leaf (cut leaf?)

Ha!, good point.

"Pam Rudd" wrote in message
...
When last we left our heros, on Sat, 28 Jun 2003 02:15:54 -0800,
(Jan Flora) scribbled:

I really wonder sometimes, exactly where do people think
the resistance that is bred into hybrids came from?


Pam





--
Tuba players are like the bikers of the band.
-Dr. Mark Chachich





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Old 01-07-2003, 08:08 AM
Joanne
 
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Default Tomato problems: potato leaf vs, regular leaf (cut leaf?)

On Sun, 29 Jun 2003 11:34:08 -0400, Pam Rudd
wrote:

When last we left our heros, on Sat, 28 Jun 2003 02:15:54 -0800,
(Jan Flora) scribbled:

The older potato leaf varieties probably don't have the disease resistance
that the new hybrids do.


Hogwash!

snip

I really wonder sometimes, exactly where do people think
the resistance that is bred into hybrids came from?

Pam


Colour me foolish... laboritories? I dunno; tinkering too much? Human
curiousity run amuck?



jcm

Toronto, Canada
Canadian zone 5b, U.S. zone is apparently 4b

I'm just trying to find my way amongst the forest of diverse information.

Thanks to global warming it's bloody hot here!
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Old 16-07-2003, 06:11 AM
news.verizon.net
 
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Default Tomato problems: potato leaf vs, regular leaf (cut leaf?)

Potato leaf plants have a thicker epidermis than regular leaf so theory is
they're more disease resistant/durable. Also, heirlooms have withstood the
test of time, their disappearance in the past was not like the dinosaurs but
because of modern breeding for durable fruits to ship to market.

As for TMV, less than 1% of the current tobacco has the disease.

Mark


"Jan Flora" wrote in message
...
In article ,
(Joanne) wrote:

Another thread about tomatoes got me thinking. Is there a difference
to the types of problems faced by tomatoes with "potato" leaves vs.
those with the more common "cut" leaves?

I'm possitive that they have different enemies and I'm sure that the
back part of my brain knows what they are but I can't recall at this
moment, so I thought that a refresher was inorder.

Thanks for your help!

jcm
Toronto, Ontario
Canadian zone 5b, don't know my U.S. zone equivilant.
Thanks to global warming it's bloody hot here!


The older potato leaf varieties probably don't have the disease resistance
that the new hybrids do.

We're smokers. We have a Tumbler in our kitchen window and it's cranking
out 'maters like crazy. It *must* be resistant to tobacco mosaic virus, as
almost all commercial tobacco is infected. (I don't touch the plant

without
washing my hands first, but my DH does and the plant is just thriving.)

Jan
Homer, Alaska (59 N.)
USDA Zone 3 We're enjoying global warming over here, too : )



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Old 17-03-2005, 08:53 PM
Texas Tomatoes
 
Posts: n/a
Default

True...kinda. Alot of the older heirlooms have some resistance to certain
diseases and little or none to others. Disease resistant hybrids were
created taking the desired traits of those heirlooms and combining them.
"Joanne" wrote in message
...
On Sun, 29 Jun 2003 11:34:08 -0400, Pam Rudd
wrote:

When last we left our heros, on Sat, 28 Jun 2003 02:15:54 -0800,
(Jan Flora) scribbled:

The older potato leaf varieties probably don't have the disease
resistance
that the new hybrids do.


Hogwash!

snip

I really wonder sometimes, exactly where do people think
the resistance that is bred into hybrids came from?

Pam


Colour me foolish... laboritories? I dunno; tinkering too much? Human
curiousity run amuck?



jcm

Toronto, Canada
Canadian zone 5b, U.S. zone is apparently 4b

I'm just trying to find my way amongst the forest of diverse information.

Thanks to global warming it's bloody hot here!





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