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Old 06-02-2003, 04:13 AM
Dave M. Picklyk
 
Posts: n/a
Default co2 DIY slowing down...when to change bottle?

I think I made a mistake, I added the yeast cold to the mixture. This
wouldn't mean a much slower restart. I should've waited for the yeast to
warm to room temperature before adding.

Darn.

"Dave M. Picklyk" wrote in message
news
Jody, I've taken your advice and added another1/4 teas. of yeast to my
mixture (I first dissolved the yeast in a tad of cold water before adding
it
to the bottle). I've sloshed everything up a bit in the bottle after
replacing the cap to mix it up. I hope that won't slow it down any
temporarily before it starts up again. How does it usually work for you on
the second 'charge'? And how long will it go for again? (I have 2 cups of
sugar in my mixture)

thanx,
Dave.


"Jody" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
You can't do it indefinitely, but doing a second 'charge' has worked for

me.

Jody

"Jim Miller" wrote in message
...
iirc the problem is that while producing co2 the other output product

is
ethanol which starts to poison the yeast.

diminishing returns...

jtm

--
Remove NOSPAM for email replies
"Jody" wrote in message
...
Well, you could try adding another 1/4tsp of yeast and see if you can

keep
it going another week or two. I would say 4 weeks is the max you will

ever
be able to get. Depending on the size of your tank, two bottles going

at
once via the T connector might be too much CO2; 26ppm is pretty high
already. You just have to use your best judgement on when to change.

If
you got an initial 0.5 drop in pH for example, and it comes back up

more
than 0.2 or 0.3, you might want to change it or recharge it as

suggested
with more yeast.

Jody

"Dave M. Picklyk" wrote in message
...
My C02 DIY has been running for 9 days now at 26ppm, 7.1ph. Now the

Ph
has
gone up to 7.2, meaning I have about 21ppm of C02. I have an

airstone
attached to the hose so I can't really count the bubbles but I

believe
the
stream has slowed a tad. When should I hook up a new bottle? Or

should
I
get
one going now and attach a new one with a T connector?

How much should the ph go up and c02 go down before changing? I

don't
any
extreme changes to mess things up.

Dave.














  #2   Report Post  
Old 06-02-2003, 04:13 AM
Dave M. Picklyk
 
Posts: n/a
Default co2 DIY slowing down...when to change bottle?

I think I made a mistake, I added the yeast cold to the mixture. This
wouldn't mean a much slower restart. I should've waited for the yeast to
warm to room temperature before adding.

Darn.

"Dave M. Picklyk" wrote in message
news
Jody, I've taken your advice and added another1/4 teas. of yeast to my
mixture (I first dissolved the yeast in a tad of cold water before adding
it
to the bottle). I've sloshed everything up a bit in the bottle after
replacing the cap to mix it up. I hope that won't slow it down any
temporarily before it starts up again. How does it usually work for you on
the second 'charge'? And how long will it go for again? (I have 2 cups of
sugar in my mixture)

thanx,
Dave.


"Jody" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
You can't do it indefinitely, but doing a second 'charge' has worked for

me.

Jody

"Jim Miller" wrote in message
...
iirc the problem is that while producing co2 the other output product

is
ethanol which starts to poison the yeast.

diminishing returns...

jtm

--
Remove NOSPAM for email replies
"Jody" wrote in message
...
Well, you could try adding another 1/4tsp of yeast and see if you can

keep
it going another week or two. I would say 4 weeks is the max you will

ever
be able to get. Depending on the size of your tank, two bottles going

at
once via the T connector might be too much CO2; 26ppm is pretty high
already. You just have to use your best judgement on when to change.

If
you got an initial 0.5 drop in pH for example, and it comes back up

more
than 0.2 or 0.3, you might want to change it or recharge it as

suggested
with more yeast.

Jody

"Dave M. Picklyk" wrote in message
...
My C02 DIY has been running for 9 days now at 26ppm, 7.1ph. Now the

Ph
has
gone up to 7.2, meaning I have about 21ppm of C02. I have an

airstone
attached to the hose so I can't really count the bubbles but I

believe
the
stream has slowed a tad. When should I hook up a new bottle? Or

should
I
get
one going now and attach a new one with a T connector?

How much should the ph go up and c02 go down before changing? I

don't
any
extreme changes to mess things up.

Dave.













  #3   Report Post  
Old 06-02-2003, 04:14 AM
Barry
 
Posts: n/a
Default co2 DIY slowing down...when to change bottle?

I recommend removing all the liquid, not adding more yeast. The yeast
is not the problem, it's either they run out of sugar or the alcohol
concentration gets too high. I usually pour out the entire mixture,
leaving the nasty film of yeast on the bottom of the bottle. Then
replace with fresh sugar water, mix, and let them recover. I get quite
a few "charges" out of this method.
--Barry


In article ,
"Dave M. Picklyk" wrote:

Jody, I've taken your advice and added another1/4 teas. of yeast to my
mixture (I first dissolved the yeast in a tad of cold water before adding it
to the bottle). I've sloshed everything up a bit in the bottle after
replacing the cap to mix it up. I hope that won't slow it down any
temporarily before it starts up again. How does it usually work for you on
the second 'charge'? And how long will it go for again? (I have 2 cups of
sugar in my mixture)

thanx,
Dave.


"Jody" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
You can't do it indefinitely, but doing a second 'charge' has worked for

me.

Jody

"Jim Miller" wrote in message
...
iirc the problem is that while producing co2 the other output product is
ethanol which starts to poison the yeast.

diminishing returns...

jtm

--
Remove NOSPAM for email replies
"Jody" wrote in message
...
Well, you could try adding another 1/4tsp of yeast and see if you can

keep
it going another week or two. I would say 4 weeks is the max you will

ever
be able to get. Depending on the size of your tank, two bottles going

at
once via the T connector might be too much CO2; 26ppm is pretty high
already. You just have to use your best judgement on when to change.

If
you got an initial 0.5 drop in pH for example, and it comes back up more
than 0.2 or 0.3, you might want to change it or recharge it as suggested
with more yeast.

Jody

"Dave M. Picklyk" wrote in message
...
My C02 DIY has been running for 9 days now at 26ppm, 7.1ph. Now the Ph

has
gone up to 7.2, meaning I have about 21ppm of C02. I have an airstone
attached to the hose so I can't really count the bubbles but I believe

the
stream has slowed a tad. When should I hook up a new bottle? Or should

I
get
one going now and attach a new one with a T connector?

How much should the ph go up and c02 go down before changing? I don't

any
extreme changes to mess things up.

Dave.











  #4   Report Post  
Old 06-02-2003, 04:14 AM
Barry
 
Posts: n/a
Default co2 DIY slowing down...when to change bottle?

I recommend removing all the liquid, not adding more yeast. The yeast
is not the problem, it's either they run out of sugar or the alcohol
concentration gets too high. I usually pour out the entire mixture,
leaving the nasty film of yeast on the bottom of the bottle. Then
replace with fresh sugar water, mix, and let them recover. I get quite
a few "charges" out of this method.
--Barry


In article ,
"Dave M. Picklyk" wrote:

Jody, I've taken your advice and added another1/4 teas. of yeast to my
mixture (I first dissolved the yeast in a tad of cold water before adding it
to the bottle). I've sloshed everything up a bit in the bottle after
replacing the cap to mix it up. I hope that won't slow it down any
temporarily before it starts up again. How does it usually work for you on
the second 'charge'? And how long will it go for again? (I have 2 cups of
sugar in my mixture)

thanx,
Dave.


"Jody" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
You can't do it indefinitely, but doing a second 'charge' has worked for

me.

Jody

"Jim Miller" wrote in message
...
iirc the problem is that while producing co2 the other output product is
ethanol which starts to poison the yeast.

diminishing returns...

jtm

--
Remove NOSPAM for email replies
"Jody" wrote in message
...
Well, you could try adding another 1/4tsp of yeast and see if you can

keep
it going another week or two. I would say 4 weeks is the max you will

ever
be able to get. Depending on the size of your tank, two bottles going

at
once via the T connector might be too much CO2; 26ppm is pretty high
already. You just have to use your best judgement on when to change.

If
you got an initial 0.5 drop in pH for example, and it comes back up more
than 0.2 or 0.3, you might want to change it or recharge it as suggested
with more yeast.

Jody

"Dave M. Picklyk" wrote in message
...
My C02 DIY has been running for 9 days now at 26ppm, 7.1ph. Now the Ph

has
gone up to 7.2, meaning I have about 21ppm of C02. I have an airstone
attached to the hose so I can't really count the bubbles but I believe

the
stream has slowed a tad. When should I hook up a new bottle? Or should

I
get
one going now and attach a new one with a T connector?

How much should the ph go up and c02 go down before changing? I don't

any
extreme changes to mess things up.

Dave.











  #5   Report Post  
Old 07-02-2003, 05:25 AM
Ron Kundla
 
Posts: n/a
Default co2 DIY slowing down...when to change bottle?

The alcohol by-product is what inhibits the CO2 production by yeast in
a fixed volume of a DIY bottle.

If you drain out most of the liquid and add new sugar water, the
remaining live yeast will then have a new food supply and the alcohol
will be diluted to a safe level. This allows the yeast to begin the
process over again and generate CO2.

As long as you have a surviving culture, you can reuse the same yeast
for quite some time before it kinda gives up and you have to start
fresh.

On Thu, 06 Feb 2003 05:57:26 GMT, "Dave M. Picklyk"
wrote:

Hmm...slight problem. I've sloshed around all that excess scum on the bottom
with everything else. It's been a couple hours and even though bubbles are
slowly forming in the bottle I've still got not bubbles coming out. I think
it's time for an emergency- quickly get another totally new batch going. I
don't know how long it's going to take the old stuff to start but... who
knows?

So, even if the old stuff gets going good again I should still hook up a
fresh batch?---I heard something here about poisoning the yeast.

Getting confused,
Dave.




  #6   Report Post  
Old 07-02-2003, 05:25 AM
Ron Kundla
 
Posts: n/a
Default co2 DIY slowing down...when to change bottle?

The alcohol by-product is what inhibits the CO2 production by yeast in
a fixed volume of a DIY bottle.

If you drain out most of the liquid and add new sugar water, the
remaining live yeast will then have a new food supply and the alcohol
will be diluted to a safe level. This allows the yeast to begin the
process over again and generate CO2.

As long as you have a surviving culture, you can reuse the same yeast
for quite some time before it kinda gives up and you have to start
fresh.

On Thu, 06 Feb 2003 05:57:26 GMT, "Dave M. Picklyk"
wrote:

Hmm...slight problem. I've sloshed around all that excess scum on the bottom
with everything else. It's been a couple hours and even though bubbles are
slowly forming in the bottle I've still got not bubbles coming out. I think
it's time for an emergency- quickly get another totally new batch going. I
don't know how long it's going to take the old stuff to start but... who
knows?

So, even if the old stuff gets going good again I should still hook up a
fresh batch?---I heard something here about poisoning the yeast.

Getting confused,
Dave.


  #7   Report Post  
Old 07-02-2003, 06:17 AM
Jody
 
Posts: n/a
Default co2 DIY slowing down...when to change bottle?

I dissolve the yeast in warm water before adding. I should qualify that I
use 2 cups of sugar initially in a 2 liter bottle, and I'm sure the amount
of sugar present determines how successful the additional yeast will be. If
the bubble rate doesn't increase within a few hours, then it is probably not
going to work for you. It could also depend on the type of yeast used.
What works in one recipe may not work in another, but it's worth a try.

Jody

"Dave M. Picklyk" wrote in message
news
Jody, I've taken your advice and added another1/4 teas. of yeast to my
mixture (I first dissolved the yeast in a tad of cold water before adding
it
to the bottle). I've sloshed everything up a bit in the bottle after
replacing the cap to mix it up. I hope that won't slow it down any
temporarily before it starts up again. How does it usually work for you on
the second 'charge'? And how long will it go for again? (I have 2 cups of
sugar in my mixture)

thanx,
Dave.


"Jody" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
You can't do it indefinitely, but doing a second 'charge' has worked for

me.

Jody

"Jim Miller" wrote in message
...
iirc the problem is that while producing co2 the other output product

is
ethanol which starts to poison the yeast.

diminishing returns...

jtm

--
Remove NOSPAM for email replies
"Jody" wrote in message
...
Well, you could try adding another 1/4tsp of yeast and see if you can

keep
it going another week or two. I would say 4 weeks is the max you will

ever
be able to get. Depending on the size of your tank, two bottles going

at
once via the T connector might be too much CO2; 26ppm is pretty high
already. You just have to use your best judgement on when to change.

If
you got an initial 0.5 drop in pH for example, and it comes back up

more
than 0.2 or 0.3, you might want to change it or recharge it as

suggested
with more yeast.

Jody

"Dave M. Picklyk" wrote in message
...
My C02 DIY has been running for 9 days now at 26ppm, 7.1ph. Now the

Ph
has
gone up to 7.2, meaning I have about 21ppm of C02. I have an

airstone
attached to the hose so I can't really count the bubbles but I

believe
the
stream has slowed a tad. When should I hook up a new bottle? Or

should
I
get
one going now and attach a new one with a T connector?

How much should the ph go up and c02 go down before changing? I

don't
any
extreme changes to mess things up.

Dave.














  #8   Report Post  
Old 07-02-2003, 06:17 AM
Jody
 
Posts: n/a
Default co2 DIY slowing down...when to change bottle?

I dissolve the yeast in warm water before adding. I should qualify that I
use 2 cups of sugar initially in a 2 liter bottle, and I'm sure the amount
of sugar present determines how successful the additional yeast will be. If
the bubble rate doesn't increase within a few hours, then it is probably not
going to work for you. It could also depend on the type of yeast used.
What works in one recipe may not work in another, but it's worth a try.

Jody

"Dave M. Picklyk" wrote in message
news
Jody, I've taken your advice and added another1/4 teas. of yeast to my
mixture (I first dissolved the yeast in a tad of cold water before adding
it
to the bottle). I've sloshed everything up a bit in the bottle after
replacing the cap to mix it up. I hope that won't slow it down any
temporarily before it starts up again. How does it usually work for you on
the second 'charge'? And how long will it go for again? (I have 2 cups of
sugar in my mixture)

thanx,
Dave.


"Jody" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
You can't do it indefinitely, but doing a second 'charge' has worked for

me.

Jody

"Jim Miller" wrote in message
...
iirc the problem is that while producing co2 the other output product

is
ethanol which starts to poison the yeast.

diminishing returns...

jtm

--
Remove NOSPAM for email replies
"Jody" wrote in message
...
Well, you could try adding another 1/4tsp of yeast and see if you can

keep
it going another week or two. I would say 4 weeks is the max you will

ever
be able to get. Depending on the size of your tank, two bottles going

at
once via the T connector might be too much CO2; 26ppm is pretty high
already. You just have to use your best judgement on when to change.

If
you got an initial 0.5 drop in pH for example, and it comes back up

more
than 0.2 or 0.3, you might want to change it or recharge it as

suggested
with more yeast.

Jody

"Dave M. Picklyk" wrote in message
...
My C02 DIY has been running for 9 days now at 26ppm, 7.1ph. Now the

Ph
has
gone up to 7.2, meaning I have about 21ppm of C02. I have an

airstone
attached to the hose so I can't really count the bubbles but I

believe
the
stream has slowed a tad. When should I hook up a new bottle? Or

should
I
get
one going now and attach a new one with a T connector?

How much should the ph go up and c02 go down before changing? I

don't
any
extreme changes to mess things up.

Dave.














  #9   Report Post  
Old 12-02-2003, 10:35 PM
Ron Kundla
 
Posts: n/a
Default co2 DIY slowing down...when to change bottle?

Good advice.

I stopped messing with yeast and went to pressurized CO2. No fuss, no
muss and with a DIY in-line external reactor, I am good to go! :-D

Ron

  #10   Report Post  
Old 12-02-2003, 10:35 PM
Ron Kundla
 
Posts: n/a
Default co2 DIY slowing down...when to change bottle?

Good advice.

I stopped messing with yeast and went to pressurized CO2. No fuss, no
muss and with a DIY in-line external reactor, I am good to go! :-D

Ron



  #11   Report Post  
Old 20-04-2003, 07:22 AM
Jody
 
Posts: n/a
Default co2 DIY slowing down...when to change bottle?

Well, you could try adding another 1/4tsp of yeast and see if you can keep
it going another week or two. I would say 4 weeks is the max you will ever
be able to get. Depending on the size of your tank, two bottles going at
once via the T connector might be too much CO2; 26ppm is pretty high
already. You just have to use your best judgement on when to change. If
you got an initial 0.5 drop in pH for example, and it comes back up more
than 0.2 or 0.3, you might want to change it or recharge it as suggested
with more yeast.

Jody

"Dave M. Picklyk" wrote in message
...
My C02 DIY has been running for 9 days now at 26ppm, 7.1ph. Now the Ph has
gone up to 7.2, meaning I have about 21ppm of C02. I have an airstone
attached to the hose so I can't really count the bubbles but I believe the
stream has slowed a tad. When should I hook up a new bottle? Or should I

get
one going now and attach a new one with a T connector?

How much should the ph go up and c02 go down before changing? I don't any
extreme changes to mess things up.

Dave.





  #12   Report Post  
Old 20-04-2003, 07:22 AM
Jim Miller
 
Posts: n/a
Default co2 DIY slowing down...when to change bottle?

iirc the problem is that while producing co2 the other output product is
ethanol which starts to poison the yeast.

diminishing returns...

jtm

--
Remove NOSPAM for email replies
"Jody" wrote in message
...
Well, you could try adding another 1/4tsp of yeast and see if you can keep
it going another week or two. I would say 4 weeks is the max you will ever
be able to get. Depending on the size of your tank, two bottles going at
once via the T connector might be too much CO2; 26ppm is pretty high
already. You just have to use your best judgement on when to change. If
you got an initial 0.5 drop in pH for example, and it comes back up more
than 0.2 or 0.3, you might want to change it or recharge it as suggested
with more yeast.

Jody

"Dave M. Picklyk" wrote in message
...
My C02 DIY has been running for 9 days now at 26ppm, 7.1ph. Now the Ph has
gone up to 7.2, meaning I have about 21ppm of C02. I have an airstone
attached to the hose so I can't really count the bubbles but I believe the
stream has slowed a tad. When should I hook up a new bottle? Or should I

get
one going now and attach a new one with a T connector?

How much should the ph go up and c02 go down before changing? I don't any
extreme changes to mess things up.

Dave.






  #13   Report Post  
Old 20-04-2003, 07:22 AM
Jody
 
Posts: n/a
Default co2 DIY slowing down...when to change bottle?

You can't do it indefinitely, but doing a second 'charge' has worked for me.

Jody

"Jim Miller" wrote in message
...
iirc the problem is that while producing co2 the other output product is
ethanol which starts to poison the yeast.

diminishing returns...

jtm

--
Remove NOSPAM for email replies
"Jody" wrote in message
...
Well, you could try adding another 1/4tsp of yeast and see if you can keep
it going another week or two. I would say 4 weeks is the max you will

ever
be able to get. Depending on the size of your tank, two bottles going at
once via the T connector might be too much CO2; 26ppm is pretty high
already. You just have to use your best judgement on when to change. If
you got an initial 0.5 drop in pH for example, and it comes back up more
than 0.2 or 0.3, you might want to change it or recharge it as suggested
with more yeast.

Jody

"Dave M. Picklyk" wrote in message
...
My C02 DIY has been running for 9 days now at 26ppm, 7.1ph. Now the Ph

has
gone up to 7.2, meaning I have about 21ppm of C02. I have an airstone
attached to the hose so I can't really count the bubbles but I believe

the
stream has slowed a tad. When should I hook up a new bottle? Or should I

get
one going now and attach a new one with a T connector?

How much should the ph go up and c02 go down before changing? I don't

any
extreme changes to mess things up.

Dave.









  #14   Report Post  
Old 20-04-2003, 07:22 AM
Barry
 
Posts: n/a
Default co2 DIY slowing down...when to change bottle?

I recommend removing all the liquid, not adding more yeast. The yeast
is not the problem, it's either they run out of sugar or the alcohol
concentration gets too high. I usually pour out the entire mixture,
leaving the nasty film of yeast on the bottom of the bottle. Then
replace with fresh sugar water, mix, and let them recover. I get quite
a few "charges" out of this method.
--Barry


In article ,
"Dave M. Picklyk" wrote:

Jody, I've taken your advice and added another1/4 teas. of yeast to my
mixture (I first dissolved the yeast in a tad of cold water before adding it
to the bottle). I've sloshed everything up a bit in the bottle after
replacing the cap to mix it up. I hope that won't slow it down any
temporarily before it starts up again. How does it usually work for you on
the second 'charge'? And how long will it go for again? (I have 2 cups of
sugar in my mixture)

thanx,
Dave.


"Jody" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
You can't do it indefinitely, but doing a second 'charge' has worked for

me.

Jody

"Jim Miller" wrote in message
...
iirc the problem is that while producing co2 the other output product is
ethanol which starts to poison the yeast.

diminishing returns...

jtm

--
Remove NOSPAM for email replies
"Jody" wrote in message
...
Well, you could try adding another 1/4tsp of yeast and see if you can

keep
it going another week or two. I would say 4 weeks is the max you will

ever
be able to get. Depending on the size of your tank, two bottles going

at
once via the T connector might be too much CO2; 26ppm is pretty high
already. You just have to use your best judgement on when to change.

If
you got an initial 0.5 drop in pH for example, and it comes back up more
than 0.2 or 0.3, you might want to change it or recharge it as suggested
with more yeast.

Jody

"Dave M. Picklyk" wrote in message
...
My C02 DIY has been running for 9 days now at 26ppm, 7.1ph. Now the Ph

has
gone up to 7.2, meaning I have about 21ppm of C02. I have an airstone
attached to the hose so I can't really count the bubbles but I believe

the
stream has slowed a tad. When should I hook up a new bottle? Or should

I
get
one going now and attach a new one with a T connector?

How much should the ph go up and c02 go down before changing? I don't

any
extreme changes to mess things up.

Dave.











  #15   Report Post  
Old 20-04-2003, 07:22 AM
Ron Kundla
 
Posts: n/a
Default co2 DIY slowing down...when to change bottle?

The alcohol by-product is what inhibits the CO2 production by yeast in
a fixed volume of a DIY bottle.

If you drain out most of the liquid and add new sugar water, the
remaining live yeast will then have a new food supply and the alcohol
will be diluted to a safe level. This allows the yeast to begin the
process over again and generate CO2.

As long as you have a surviving culture, you can reuse the same yeast
for quite some time before it kinda gives up and you have to start
fresh.

On Thu, 06 Feb 2003 05:57:26 GMT, "Dave M. Picklyk"
wrote:

Hmm...slight problem. I've sloshed around all that excess scum on the bottom
with everything else. It's been a couple hours and even though bubbles are
slowly forming in the bottle I've still got not bubbles coming out. I think
it's time for an emergency- quickly get another totally new batch going. I
don't know how long it's going to take the old stuff to start but... who
knows?

So, even if the old stuff gets going good again I should still hook up a
fresh batch?---I heard something here about poisoning the yeast.

Getting confused,
Dave.




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