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Old 11-08-2008, 04:47 AM posted to rec.gardens.edible,rec.gardens
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Default Pepper saga.......... Pepper expert anyone?

I've already mentioned the problems with our Bell peppers this year.
Whitefly and spider mite but these may not be the whole problem. I've look
online and can't find these symptoms anywhere. These peppers came from
three different places, some I stared myself last spring. Within a week of
planting them out their leaves looked "strange." Instead of being smooth and
flat, they started to look like seer-sucker, kind of 'puckery' and the
plants failed to make normal growth. As the weeks passed they made buds but
all flowers and buds fell off along with the bottom leaves. Leaves were
still green when they fell. Now over a month later I'm seeing small yellow
spots with dark brown centers and leaves are curling upward slightly. It's
getting paler between the veins. The plants are tall, spindly, leaves are
sparse and only a handful of peppers were produced from 18 plants. In the
past few weeks the spider mites and whitefly infested them completely and
every spray I used failed to make a difference. Ideas anyone? Thoughts?
Suggestions? What disease can this be?

By this time other years we'd have so many peppers we'd be giving them
away - and from no more than 6 to 10 plants.


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Old 11-08-2008, 05:18 AM posted to rec.gardens.edible,rec.gardens
Val Val is offline
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Posts: 296
Default Pepper saga.......... Pepper expert anyone?

Google is your friend....pepper plants+diseases....first hit of 254,000+ is
a site with descriptions and pictures of all the problems you've described.

Val


"Marie Dodge" wrote in message
...
I've already mentioned the problems with our Bell peppers this year.
Whitefly and spider mite but these may not be the whole problem. I've look
online and can't find these symptoms anywhere. These peppers came from
three different places, some I stared myself last spring. Within a week of
planting them out their leaves looked "strange." Instead of being smooth
and flat, they started to look like seer-sucker, kind of 'puckery' and the
plants failed to make normal growth. As the weeks passed they made buds
but all flowers and buds fell off along with the bottom leaves. Leaves
were still green when they fell. Now over a month later I'm seeing small
yellow spots with dark brown centers and leaves are curling upward
slightly. It's getting paler between the veins. The plants are tall,
spindly, leaves are sparse and only a handful of peppers were produced
from 18 plants. In the past few weeks the spider mites and whitefly
infested them completely and every spray I used failed to make a
difference. Ideas anyone? Thoughts? Suggestions? What disease can this
be?

By this time other years we'd have so many peppers we'd be giving them
away - and from no more than 6 to 10 plants.



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Old 11-08-2008, 05:54 AM posted to rec.gardens.edible,rec.gardens
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Posts: 331
Default Pepper saga.......... Pepper expert anyone?


"Val" wrote in message
...
Google is your friend....pepper plants+diseases....first hit of 254,000+
is a site with descriptions and pictures of all the problems you've
described.


Which site had the descriptions I described? What is the URL? I waded
through many sites before asking here because none mentioned the problem I'm
experiencing - and I don't have the time to read 254,000 sites. So which
site did you see the answers on?

TIA


Val


"Marie Dodge" wrote in message
...
I've already mentioned the problems with our Bell peppers this year.
Whitefly and spider mite but these may not be the whole problem. I've
look online and can't find these symptoms anywhere. These peppers came
from three different places, some I stared myself last spring. Within a
week of planting them out their leaves looked "strange." Instead of being
smooth and flat, they started to look like seer-sucker, kind of 'puckery'
and the plants failed to make normal growth. As the weeks passed they
made buds but all flowers and buds fell off along with the bottom leaves.
Leaves were still green when they fell. Now over a month later I'm seeing
small yellow spots with dark brown centers and leaves are curling upward
slightly. It's getting paler between the veins. The plants are tall,
spindly, leaves are sparse and only a handful of peppers were produced
from 18 plants. In the past few weeks the spider mites and whitefly
infested them completely and every spray I used failed to make a
difference. Ideas anyone? Thoughts? Suggestions? What disease can this
be?

By this time other years we'd have so many peppers we'd be giving them
away - and from no more than 6 to 10 plants.




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Old 11-08-2008, 10:33 AM posted to rec.gardens.edible,rec.gardens
Val Val is offline
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First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Aug 2006
Posts: 296
Default Pepper saga.......... Pepper expert anyone?


"Marie Dodge" wrote in message
...

"Val" wrote in message
...
Google is your friend....pepper plants+diseases....first hit of 254,000+
is a site with descriptions and pictures of all the problems you've
described.


Which site had the descriptions I described? What is the URL? I waded
through many sites before asking here because none mentioned the problem
I'm experiencing - and I don't have the time to read 254,000 sites. So
which site did you see the answers on?


You didn't even look did you? You haven't "waded" thru anything. No wonder
you toss crap all over your garden, fix nothing, destroy much and then whine
away about lousy results. OK Marie Dodge, you're either too damned stupid to
follow simple instructions or just too ****ing lazy to be even half smart.
I'm going to give you the benefit of the doubt and consider you just beyond
real damned stupid and give you a direct link to the FIRST HIT you would
have got on Google IF you'd put "pepper plants+diseases" in the little
search box, which you obviously didn't. Not that you will actually read it,
just like you didn't read anything about all that shit you have dumped all
over God knows what or even actually read **FIRST HIT** in my post. Do you
move your lips when you read, Marie? Perhaps if you run your finger under
each word and carefully say it out loud it will help with your
comprehension...or not.
http://plantpathology.tamu.edu/Texla...ers/pepper.asp

After reading the problems you say you have with your peppers and actually
having read the above site I have come to this conclusion: You have, in the
most haphazard fashion, poisoned or obliterated anything positive in/on your
ground. You garden is rampant with viral, bacterial and fungal disease that
has pretty much cancelled out any good trying to bring harmonious balance.
You've saved seeds from diseased and weakened plants to perpetuate the
horrors of your toxic gardening and any newcomers you plant in that quagmire
of festering ilk don't stand a chance. What you are doing 20 years ago would
be called ignorance, now it's just blatant stupidity. The fix will require
intelligence, commitment, research, patience, and hard work over a period of
time, none of these qualities do you seem to possess. You are of the kind
Monsanto, Dow and Dupont woo and court because you long for a magic bullet
that doesn't exist. You need to sell your place as soon as possible, move to
a sub basement apartment with absolutely NO PLACE to even ATTEMPT to grow
any living thing, have your groceries delivered and live off of Nuke & Puke
dinners, use lots of chemical sprays and cleaning agents in your enclosed
environment so you don't go cold turkey on toxins. Then stick a plastic
plant in a hunk of Styrofoam on your window sill next to the little ceramic
napping cat and call it good.

GeeeeeeeeZUZ****inkeeeeeeryestonacrutch, where is Joe SpareBedroom when I
need him!?!?

Val



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Old 11-08-2008, 06:21 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible,rec.gardens
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Posts: 124
Default Pepper saga.......... Pepper expert anyone?

On Mon, 11 Aug 2008 02:33:16 -0700, "Val"
wrote:

Val



You know, a little more fruit in your diet, and you won't be so
constipated.



Penelope
--
"Maybe you'd like to ask the Wizard for a heart."
"ElissaAnn"


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Old 11-08-2008, 06:37 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible,rec.gardens
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First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Jul 2008
Posts: 503
Default Pepper saga.......... Pepper expert anyone?

In article ,
"Val" wrote:

"Marie Dodge" wrote in message
...

"Val" wrote in message
...
Google is your friend....pepper plants+diseases....first hit of 254,000+
is a site with descriptions and pictures of all the problems you've
described.


Which site had the descriptions I described? What is the URL? I waded
through many sites before asking here because none mentioned the problem
I'm experiencing - and I don't have the time to read 254,000 sites. So
which site did you see the answers on?


You didn't even look did you? You haven't "waded" thru anything. No wonder
you toss crap all over your garden, fix nothing, destroy much and then whine
away about lousy results. OK Marie Dodge, you're either too damned stupid to
follow simple instructions or just too ****ing lazy to be even half smart.
I'm going to give you the benefit of the doubt and consider you just beyond
real damned stupid and give you a direct link to the FIRST HIT you would
have got on Google IF you'd put "pepper plants+diseases" in the little
search box, which you obviously didn't. Not that you will actually read it,
just like you didn't read anything about all that shit you have dumped all
over God knows what or even actually read **FIRST HIT** in my post. Do you
move your lips when you read, Marie? Perhaps if you run your finger under
each word and carefully say it out loud it will help with your
comprehension...or not.
http://plantpathology.tamu.edu/Texla...ers/pepper.asp

After reading the problems you say you have with your peppers and actually
having read the above site I have come to this conclusion: You have, in the
most haphazard fashion, poisoned or obliterated anything positive in/on your
ground. You garden is rampant with viral, bacterial and fungal disease that
has pretty much cancelled out any good trying to bring harmonious balance.
You've saved seeds from diseased and weakened plants to perpetuate the
horrors of your toxic gardening and any newcomers you plant in that quagmire
of festering ilk don't stand a chance. What you are doing 20 years ago would
be called ignorance, now it's just blatant stupidity. The fix will require
intelligence, commitment, research, patience, and hard work over a period of
time, none of these qualities do you seem to possess. You are of the kind
Monsanto, Dow and Dupont woo and court because you long for a magic bullet
that doesn't exist. You need to sell your place as soon as possible, move to
a sub basement apartment with absolutely NO PLACE to even ATTEMPT to grow
any living thing, have your groceries delivered and live off of Nuke & Puke
dinners, use lots of chemical sprays and cleaning agents in your enclosed
environment so you don't go cold turkey on toxins. Then stick a plastic
plant in a hunk of Styrofoam on your window sill next to the little ceramic
napping cat and call it good.

GeeeeeeeeZUZ****inkeeeeeeryestonacrutch, where is Joe SpareBedroom when I
need him!?!?

Val


Don't be hard on yourself Val. I don't think Joe could have been any
more eloquent than you have. It's hard not to think that "merry dodge"
isn't someone's sock puppet, whose sole purpose is to pull our chain.
I haven't been following this latest "dodge" adventure and it sounds
like you are all over it but I wanted to make sure every sane
gardener out there understood this one thing.

When mining companies go out of business, they leave behind large
piles of tailings (everything except the ore they were after).
These tailings end up leaching heavy metals (lead, arsenic,
cadmium) into the local watershed. It is usually about this time
the the EPA comes around and proclaims the site toxic and puts it
on the "Superfund" list.

It cost money to clean up "Superfund" sites, so from a purely
capitalistic view point you have to take your hats off to the
entrepreneurs who took their potentially costly piles of heavy metals,
bagged them up, called it fertilizer, and sold it for $12/10 lb.
under the name of "Ironite".

"They" say that it would take a very long time for the heavy metal
load of your garden soil to build up to toxic levels but we all
have a "body burden", http://www.bodyburden.org/ , and no sane
person would want to add to it. The long and the short of it is
that no amount of heavy metals is "good" for a person.

Arsenic, cadmium and lead were selected as the potential COCs (Chemicals
of concern ) in Ironite® . The concentrations of the COCs that
may be present in surface soils following long term application of
Ironite® were modeled using a conservative methodology that assumes that
Ironite® is applied at the maximum recommended rates suggested on the
label. Modeling was conducted using USEPA equations and assumptions.
Area specific values were used where necessary. The potentially complete
exposure route to the potential COCs in surface soil include ingestion,
dermal contact, and inhalation of fugitive dust.

http://www.dirtdoctor.com/view_question.php?id=120#

http://www.pccnaturalmarkets.com/sc/...3-ironite.html

http://www.envirolaw.org/poison.html

njaes.rutgers.edu/pubs/soilprofile/sp-v16.pdf

Ironite?

You can live without it.
--

Billy
Bush and Pelosi Behind Bars
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9KVTf...ef=patrick.net
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l0aEo...eature=related
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Old 11-08-2008, 06:39 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible,rec.gardens
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First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Jul 2006
Posts: 124
Default Pepper saga.......... Pepper expert anyone?

On Sun, 10 Aug 2008 22:47:55 -0500, "Marie Dodge"
wrote:

I've already mentioned the problems with our Bell peppers this year.
Whitefly and spider mite but these may not be the whole problem. I've look
online and can't find these symptoms anywhere. These peppers came from
three different places, some I stared myself last spring. Within a week of
planting them out their leaves looked "strange." Instead of being smooth and
flat, they started to look like seer-sucker, kind of 'puckery' and the
plants failed to make normal growth.



This is probably aphid damage.


As the weeks passed they made buds but
all flowers and buds fell off along with the bottom leaves. Leaves were
still green when they fell.



You don't say what part of the country you're in, or what your
cultivation techniques are, but too much or too little water, cool
nights (50F) or hot nights (~75F), or too much nitrogen can cause
flower drop. Aphids and spider mites can spread diseases, too which
can weaken the plants cause the flowers to drop as well.



Now over a month later I'm seeing small yellow
spots with dark brown centers and leaves are curling upward slightly.


Are the leaves curling long ways, or tip to stem?

Unfortunately the symptoms you're describing could be for several
diseases from bacterial spot to Cercospora. Could you post pictures on
a site like Photobucket so we can see exactly what you mean?

It's
getting paler between the veins. The plants are tall, spindly, leaves are
sparse and only a handful of peppers were produced from 18 plants. In the
past few weeks the spider mites and whitefly infested them completely and
every spray I used failed to make a difference. Ideas anyone? Thoughts?
Suggestions? What disease can this be?



The problem with spraying is that it kills the insect predators as
well as the pests, and the pests bounce back faster. The best way to
control aphids is to release lady bugs and stand back. They won't
clear out the aphids over night or kill all the aphids, but they'll
keep them under control.

I'm also wondering what you're using for fertilizer. I ask because
aphids are attracted to plants given high nitrogen fertilizers.



By this time other years we'd have so many peppers we'd be giving them
away - and from no more than 6 to 10 plants.


It's been a slow year for my plants; pepper, tomato, and egg plant. I
was hand watering at the beginning of the season because of drought
and watering restrictions, and I think they just needed more water
than hand watering could supply. Once we started having rain, they
took off, and are producing enough to make up for lost time. The
tomatoes and eggplants are coming in thick and fast, and the peppers
aren't far behind.



Penelope

--
"Maybe you'd like to ask the Wizard for a heart."
"ElissaAnn"
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Old 11-08-2008, 07:22 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible,rec.gardens
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Posts: 503
Default Pepper saga.......... Pepper expert anyone?

In article ,
Penelope Periwinkle wrote:

On Mon, 11 Aug 2008 02:33:16 -0700, "Val"
wrote:

Val



You know, a little more fruit in your diet, and you won't be so
constipated.



Penelope


When all about you are losing their heads but you stay calm, cool, and
collected, maybe you don't understand the problem ;O)
The little smiley face is to show one isn't being judgmental
;O) It can take some of the sting out of criticism or teasing.
Anyway, what is all this interest that you have in Val's
hemorrhoids? ;-) Fruit is too expensive for lubricating one's
excrement. Additionally, there is too much sugar for those of us
on low-carb, high-fiber diets. If you really want to crank up the
muzzle velocity of a BM, you want roots and green leafy vegetables.
I know. At my age, a really good BM is almost as good as sex,
almost ;O)

Save the fruits and nuts for dessert (as one Californian to another).

How are the beaches in Santa Monica this year? Have they had to
put up pollution signs because of untreated waste?
Oh, yeah ;O) Never have that problem up here. If you go in the
water, you get hypothermia or great white sharks. If you get
sharks, you don't sweat the hypothermia;o)
you
--

Billy
Bush and Pelosi Behind Bars
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9KVTf...ef=patrick.net
http://angryarab.blogspot.com/
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Old 12-08-2008, 02:13 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible,rec.gardens
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Posts: 124
Default Pepper saga.......... Pepper expert anyone?

On Mon, 11 Aug 2008 11:22:29 -0700, Billy
wrote:

When all about you are losing their heads but you stay calm, cool, and
collected, maybe you don't understand the problem ;O)
The little smiley face is to show one isn't being judgmental
;O) It can take some of the sting out of criticism or teasing.


The smiley face is:

1. A crutch for the semi-literate duffer who is unable to correctly
convey the intent and meaning of his post.

2. A tool for classic bullies, who, being cowards at heart, need a way
to weasel out of owning their words.

3. A submissive gesture used to obsequiously deflect potential
repercussions.


Since you apparently lack the capacity to differentiate defecation
from orgasm, I'm leaning towards the first; however, since it is
possible that your kink runs that way, I'm keeping an open mind on the
subject.


Save the fruits and nuts for dessert (as one Californian to another).



To whom are you speaking?


How are the beaches in Santa Monica this year? Have they had to
put up pollution signs because of untreated waste?


How would I know?




Penelope
--
"Maybe you'd like to ask the Wizard for a heart."
"ElissaAnn"
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Old 12-08-2008, 05:28 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible,rec.gardens
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Posts: 503
Default Pepper saga.......... Pepper expert anyone?

In article ,
Penelope Periwinkle wrote:

On Mon, 11 Aug 2008 11:22:29 -0700, Billy
wrote:

When all about you are losing their heads but you stay calm, cool, and
collected, maybe you don't understand the problem ;O)
The little smiley face is to show one isn't being judgmental
;O) It can take some of the sting out of criticism or teasing.


The smiley face is:

1. A crutch for the semi-literate duffer who is unable to correctly
convey the intent and meaning of his post.

2. A tool for classic bullies, who, being cowards at heart, need a way
to weasel out of owning their words.

3. A submissive gesture used to obsequiously deflect potential
repercussions.


Since you apparently lack the capacity to differentiate defecation
from orgasm, I'm leaning towards the first; however, since it is
possible that your kink runs that way, I'm keeping an open mind on the
subject.


Save the fruits and nuts for dessert (as one Californian to another).



To whom are you speaking?


How are the beaches in Santa Monica this year? Have they had to
put up pollution signs because of untreated waste?


How would I know?




Penelope


You're right, I mis-con-screwed who you are but that is no reason
for defecation of character. Chew on some fresh rhubarb. It will
"lighten" your attitude;o) (He said with a pejorative intent).
--

Billy
Bush and Pelosi Behind Bars
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9KVTf...ef=patrick.net
http://www.haaretz.com/hasen/spages/1009916.html


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Old 12-08-2008, 08:01 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible,rec.gardens
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Posts: 331
Default Pepper saga.......... Pepper expert anyone?


"Penelope Periwinkle" wrote in message
...
On Mon, 11 Aug 2008 02:33:16 -0700, "Val"
wrote:

Val



You know, a little more fruit in your diet, and you won't be so
constipated.


And after reading that site and many more last night... I'm still not sure
if it's the insects that did the damage or if the peppers are diseased.
Tomorrow we have to bring a soil sample and parts of the peppers and toms to
the Ag. Ext. office in the city.




Penelope
--
"Maybe you'd like to ask the Wizard for a heart."
"ElissaAnn"


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Old 12-08-2008, 08:07 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible,rec.gardens
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Posts: 331
Default Pepper saga.......... Pepper expert anyone?


"Billy" wrote in message
...
Arsenic, cadmium and lead were selected as the potential COCs (Chemicals
of concern ) in Ironite® . The concentrations of the COCs that
may be present in surface soils following long term application of
Ironite® were modeled using a conservative methodology that assumes that
Ironite® is applied at the maximum recommended rates suggested on the
label. Modeling was conducted using USEPA equations and assumptions.
Area specific values were used where necessary. The potentially complete
exposure route to the potential COCs in surface soil include ingestion,
dermal contact, and inhalation of fugitive dust.

http://www.dirtdoctor.com/view_question.php?id=120#

http://www.pccnaturalmarkets.com/sc/...3-ironite.html

http://www.envirolaw.org/poison.html

njaes.rutgers.edu/pubs/soilprofile/sp-v16.pdf

Ironite?

You can live without it.


Yes, but the plants cannot. Our soil was very low in Iron when tested.

--

Billy
Bush and Pelosi Behind Bars
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9KVTf...ef=patrick.net
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l0aEo...eature=related


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Old 12-08-2008, 08:17 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible,rec.gardens
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Posts: 331
Default Pepper saga.......... Pepper expert anyone?


"Penelope Periwinkle" wrote in message
...
On Sun, 10 Aug 2008 22:47:55 -0500, "Marie Dodge"
wrote:

I've already mentioned the problems with our Bell peppers this year.
Whitefly and spider mite but these may not be the whole problem. I've look
online and can't find these symptoms anywhere. These peppers came from
three different places, some I stared myself last spring. Within a week of
planting them out their leaves looked "strange." Instead of being smooth
and
flat, they started to look like seer-sucker, kind of 'puckery' and the
plants failed to make normal growth.



This is probably aphid damage.


I dug out my old microscope and found some kind of beige colored mites under
the leaves. Also, the whitefly nymphs at still there. Nothing the Ag agent
recommended worked on either of them. Numbers are down, but they're still
infesting the plants.

As the weeks passed they made buds but
all flowers and buds fell off along with the bottom leaves. Leaves were
still green when they fell.


You don't say what part of the country you're in, or what your
cultivation techniques are, but too much or too little water, cool
nights (50F) or hot nights (~75F), or too much nitrogen can cause
flower drop. Aphids and spider mites can spread diseases, too which
can weaken the plants cause the flowers to drop as well.


I'm in the mid south, zone 6 where summers are long. hot, humid and often
lacking rain. The garden is in sun most of the day and contains a lot of
organic matter in the form of last years leaves and rotted down weeds,
kitchen waste etc. There are few weeds and I pull them as soon as I see
them. Plants are watered as needed. I've been gardening for many years and
never experienced anything like this before.

Now over a month later I'm seeing small yellow
spots with dark brown centers and leaves are curling upward slightly.


Are the leaves curling long ways, or tip to stem?


The long way but they also look puckered, like seer-sucker material. Today I
see they're yellowing.


Unfortunately the symptoms you're describing could be for several
diseases from bacterial spot to Cercospora. Could you post pictures on
a site like Photobucket so we can see exactly what you mean?


Yes,.... I'll take some pics of the plants and get back here with them.



It's
getting paler between the veins. The plants are tall, spindly, leaves are
sparse and only a handful of peppers were produced from 18 plants. In the
past few weeks the spider mites and whitefly infested them completely and
every spray I used failed to make a difference. Ideas anyone? Thoughts?
Suggestions? What disease can this be?



The problem with spraying is that it kills the insect predators as
well as the pests, and the pests bounce back faster. The best way to
control aphids is to release lady bugs and stand back. They won't
clear out the aphids over night or kill all the aphids, but they'll
keep them under control.


There are no aphids. Just white fly and spider mites. The underside of the
leaves were completely covered on some of the plants. I tried lady bugs some
years ago when we did have aphids, and they were gone the next day...
leaving the aphids behind.



I'm also wondering what you're using for fertilizer. I ask because
aphids are attracted to plants given high nitrogen fertilizers.


What aphids? There are no aphids. I can't afford fish fertilizers. We're
retired and on a limited income.


By this time other years we'd have so many peppers we'd be giving them
away - and from no more than 6 to 10 plants.


It's been a slow year for my plants; pepper, tomato, and egg plant. I
was hand watering at the beginning of the season because of drought
and watering restrictions, and I think they just needed more water
than hand watering could supply. Once we started having rain, they
took off, and are producing enough to make up for lost time. The
tomatoes and eggplants are coming in thick and fast, and the peppers
aren't far behind.


Rain would certainly help since I've been watering them twice a week with
the hose. But as long as the whitefly and spider mites are infesting them
I doubt they'll produce much. Nothing recommended got rid of the
infestation.





Penelope

--
"Maybe you'd like to ask the Wizard for a heart."
"ElissaAnn"


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Old 12-08-2008, 08:42 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible,rec.gardens
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First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Dec 2007
Posts: 1,096
Default Pepper saga.......... Pepper expert anyone?

In article ,
"Marie Dodge" wrote:

"Penelope Periwinkle" wrote in message
...
On Sun, 10 Aug 2008 22:47:55 -0500, "Marie Dodge"
wrote:

I've already mentioned the problems with our Bell peppers this year.
Whitefly and spider mite but these may not be the whole problem. I've look
online and can't find these symptoms anywhere. These peppers came from
three different places, some I stared myself last spring. Within a week of
planting them out their leaves looked "strange." Instead of being smooth
and
flat, they started to look like seer-sucker, kind of 'puckery' and the
plants failed to make normal growth.



This is probably aphid damage.


I dug out my old microscope and found some kind of beige colored mites under
the leaves. Also, the whitefly nymphs at still there. Nothing the Ag agent
recommended worked on either of them. Numbers are down, but they're still
infesting the plants.

As the weeks passed they made buds but
all flowers and buds fell off along with the bottom leaves. Leaves were
still green when they fell.


You don't say what part of the country you're in, or what your
cultivation techniques are, but too much or too little water, cool
nights (50F) or hot nights (~75F), or too much nitrogen can cause
flower drop. Aphids and spider mites can spread diseases, too which
can weaken the plants cause the flowers to drop as well.


I'm in the mid south, zone 6 where summers are long. hot, humid and often
lacking rain. The garden is in sun most of the day and contains a lot of
organic matter in the form of last years leaves and rotted down weeds,
kitchen waste etc. There are few weeds and I pull them as soon as I see
them. Plants are watered as needed. I've been gardening for many years and
never experienced anything like this before.

Now over a month later I'm seeing small yellow
spots with dark brown centers and leaves are curling upward slightly.


Are the leaves curling long ways, or tip to stem?


The long way but they also look puckered, like seer-sucker material. Today I
see they're yellowing.


Unfortunately the symptoms you're describing could be for several
diseases from bacterial spot to Cercospora. Could you post pictures on
a site like Photobucket so we can see exactly what you mean?


Yes,.... I'll take some pics of the plants and get back here with them.



It's
getting paler between the veins. The plants are tall, spindly, leaves are
sparse and only a handful of peppers were produced from 18 plants. In the
past few weeks the spider mites and whitefly infested them completely and
every spray I used failed to make a difference. Ideas anyone? Thoughts?
Suggestions? What disease can this be?



The problem with spraying is that it kills the insect predators as
well as the pests, and the pests bounce back faster. The best way to
control aphids is to release lady bugs and stand back. They won't
clear out the aphids over night or kill all the aphids, but they'll
keep them under control.


There are no aphids. Just white fly and spider mites. The underside of the
leaves were completely covered on some of the plants. I tried lady bugs some
years ago when we did have aphids, and they were gone the next day...
leaving the aphids behind.



I'm also wondering what you're using for fertilizer. I ask because
aphids are attracted to plants given high nitrogen fertilizers.


What aphids? There are no aphids. I can't afford fish fertilizers. We're
retired and on a limited income.


By this time other years we'd have so many peppers we'd be giving them
away - and from no more than 6 to 10 plants.


It's been a slow year for my plants; pepper, tomato, and egg plant. I
was hand watering at the beginning of the season because of drought
and watering restrictions, and I think they just needed more water
than hand watering could supply. Once we started having rain, they
took off, and are producing enough to make up for lost time. The
tomatoes and eggplants are coming in thick and fast, and the peppers
aren't far behind.


Rain would certainly help since I've been watering them twice a week with
the hose. But as long as the whitefly and spider mites are infesting them
I doubt they'll produce much. Nothing recommended got rid of the
infestation.





Penelope

--
"Maybe you'd like to ask the Wizard for a heart."
"ElissaAnn"


Perhaps worth a try.

Bill
..............

http://www.seedsofchange.com/enewsletter/issue_28/issue_28.aspProtect

Your Crops Sanely and Humanely
Hot Pepper Wax
Capsaicin, the ingredient in hot peppers that gives them heat, is a
powerful feeding deterrent and will even kill many insect pests. Hot
pepper wax is a formulation containing capsaicin, which can be sprayed
regularly on plants to prevent damage from aphids, whiteflies, spider
mites, thrips, leafhoppers, scales and many other soft-bodied insects.
It can also be used as a feeding deterrent for rabbits and deer. Waxes
in the mixture help the spray stick to leaves making it last up to two
weeks. Be sure to respray newly emerged leaves during that time period.
And don't worry, the pepper spray washes off easily enough that it won't
linger after harvest.

--
Garden in shade zone 5 S Jersey USA
  #15   Report Post  
Old 12-08-2008, 10:02 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible,rec.gardens
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Jul 2008
Posts: 503
Default Pepper saga.......... Pepper expert anyone?

In article ,
"Marie Dodge" wrote:

Ironite?

You can live without it.


Yes, but the plants cannot. Our soil was very low in Iron when tested.


Liquid Chelated Iron 32 oz. Price: $10.95

Sulfur Powder 2 lb Price: $4.95

and no heavy metals
--

Billy
Bush and Pelosi Behind Bars
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9KVTf...ef=patrick.net
http://www.haaretz.com/hasen/spages/1009916.html


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