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Old 04-05-2009, 10:58 PM posted to rec.gardens
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Default No apple blossoms on apple trees this year?

My apple trees have very few blossoms on them this year. Last year they
were loaded, this year next to nothing. I'm in the mid Wilammette Valley,
Oregon. Anyone else in the Northwest observing this?



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Old 05-05-2009, 11:22 AM posted to rec.gardens
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Default No apple blossoms on apple trees this year?

Zootal said:


My apple trees have very few blossoms on them this year. Last year they
were loaded, this year next to nothing. I'm in the mid Wilammette Valley,
Oregon. Anyone else in the Northwest observing this?


Some apple varieties have a strong tendency to develop a pattern of
alternate year bearing. Your big crop last year set you up for a small
crop this year. Extra fruit thinning may be advisable next year, in an
attempt to break the pattern.

--
Pat in Plymouth MI

"So, it was all a dream."
"No dear, this is the dream, you're still in the cell."

email valid but not regularly monitored


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Old 05-05-2009, 08:56 PM posted to rec.gardens
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Default No apple blossoms on apple trees this year?

On May 5, 11:22*am, Pat Kiewicz wrote:
Zootal said:



My apple trees have very few blossoms on them this year. Last *year they
were loaded, this year next to nothing. I'm in the mid Wilammette Valley,
Oregon. Anyone else in the Northwest observing this?


Some apple varieties have a strong tendency to develop a pattern of
alternate year bearing. *Your big crop last year set you up for a small
crop this year. *Extra fruit thinning may be advisable next year, in an
attempt to break the pattern.

--
Pat in Plymouth MI

"So, it was all a dream."
"No dear, this is the dream, you're still in the cell." *

email valid but not regularly monitored


I that it has got a lot to do with the crop that you had last year
like pat said many apple varieties will have a good year and the a
bad, do you remember what happened the year before? if you can that
will give you a good picture as to consistency of your trees. So if
nothing else you can look forward to bumper crop again next year

http://www.my-garden-hammock.com
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Old 06-05-2009, 04:30 AM posted to rec.gardens
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Default No apple blossoms on apple trees this year?


wrote in message
...
On May 5, 11:22 am, Pat Kiewicz wrote:
Zootal said:



My apple trees have very few blossoms on them this year. Last year they
were loaded, this year next to nothing. I'm in the mid Wilammette Valley,
Oregon. Anyone else in the Northwest observing this?


Some apple varieties have a strong tendency to develop a pattern of
alternate year bearing. Your big crop last year set you up for a small
crop this year. Extra fruit thinning may be advisable next year, in an
attempt to break the pattern.

--
Pat in Plymouth MI

"So, it was all a dream."
"No dear, this is the dream, you're still in the cell."

email valid but not regularly monitored


I that it has got a lot to do with the crop that you had last year
like pat said many apple varieties will have a good year and the a
bad, do you remember what happened the year before? if you can that
will give you a good picture as to consistency of your trees. So if
nothing else you can look forward to bumper crop again next year

http://www.my-garden-hammock.com


The year before was pretty sparse. I attributed that to some pruning I had
done during the winter. I guess if I get a bumper crop next year I'll have a
much better idea if that is the case. It's a very old tree, but it has very
large green/red striped apples that are quite good. Last year we got
hundreds of apples from it. Literally hundreds of apples, omg it was loaded!


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Old 06-05-2009, 01:36 PM posted to rec.gardens
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Posts: 1,342
Default No apple blossoms on apple trees this year?


"Zootal" wrote in message
...

wrote in message
...
On May 5, 11:22 am, Pat Kiewicz wrote:
Zootal said:



My apple trees have very few blossoms on them this year. Last year they
were loaded, this year next to nothing. I'm in the mid Wilammette
Valley,
Oregon. Anyone else in the Northwest observing this?


Some apple varieties have a strong tendency to develop a pattern of
alternate year bearing. Your big crop last year set you up for a small
crop this year. Extra fruit thinning may be advisable next year, in an
attempt to break the pattern.

--
Pat in Plymouth MI

"So, it was all a dream."
"No dear, this is the dream, you're still in the cell."

email valid but not regularly monitored


I that it has got a lot to do with the crop that you had last year
like pat said many apple varieties will have a good year and the a
bad, do you remember what happened the year before? if you can that
will give you a good picture as to consistency of your trees. So if
nothing else you can look forward to bumper crop again next year

http://www.my-garden-hammock.com


The year before was pretty sparse. I attributed that to some pruning I had
done during the winter. I guess if I get a bumper crop next year I'll have
a much better idea if that is the case. It's a very old tree, but it has
very large green/red striped apples that are quite good. Last year we got
hundreds of apples from it. Literally hundreds of apples, omg it was
loaded!

Since you now admit to pruning in winter then you've answered your question.




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Old 06-05-2009, 04:31 PM posted to rec.gardens
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Posts: 40
Default No apple blossoms on apple trees this year?


"brooklyn1" wrote in message
...

"Zootal" wrote in message
...

wrote in message
...
On May 5, 11:22 am, Pat Kiewicz wrote:
Zootal said:



My apple trees have very few blossoms on them this year. Last year they
were loaded, this year next to nothing. I'm in the mid Wilammette
Valley,
Oregon. Anyone else in the Northwest observing this?

Some apple varieties have a strong tendency to develop a pattern of
alternate year bearing. Your big crop last year set you up for a small
crop this year. Extra fruit thinning may be advisable next year, in an
attempt to break the pattern.

--
Pat in Plymouth MI

"So, it was all a dream."
"No dear, this is the dream, you're still in the cell."

email valid but not regularly monitored


I that it has got a lot to do with the crop that you had last year
like pat said many apple varieties will have a good year and the a
bad, do you remember what happened the year before? if you can that
will give you a good picture as to consistency of your trees. So if
nothing else you can look forward to bumper crop again next year

http://www.my-garden-hammock.com


The year before was pretty sparse. I attributed that to some pruning I
had done during the winter. I guess if I get a bumper crop next year I'll
have a much better idea if that is the case. It's a very old tree, but it
has very large green/red striped apples that are quite good. Last year we
got hundreds of apples from it. Literally hundreds of apples, omg it was
loaded!

Since you now admit to pruning in winter then you've answered your
question.


I did not prune at all last winter, so pruning does not explain the lack of
blossoms this year.


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Old 06-05-2009, 05:42 PM posted to rec.gardens
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Posts: 1,179
Default No apple blossoms on apple trees this year?

In article ,
"Zootal" wrote:

"brooklyn1" wrote in message
...

"Zootal" wrote in message
...

wrote in message
...
On May 5, 11:22 am, Pat Kiewicz wrote:
Zootal said:



My apple trees have very few blossoms on them this year. Last year they
were loaded, this year next to nothing. I'm in the mid Wilammette
Valley,
Oregon. Anyone else in the Northwest observing this?

Some apple varieties have a strong tendency to develop a pattern of
alternate year bearing. Your big crop last year set you up for a small
crop this year. Extra fruit thinning may be advisable next year, in an
attempt to break the pattern.

--
Pat in Plymouth MI

"So, it was all a dream."
"No dear, this is the dream, you're still in the cell."

email valid but not regularly monitored

I that it has got a lot to do with the crop that you had last year
like pat said many apple varieties will have a good year and the a
bad, do you remember what happened the year before? if you can that
will give you a good picture as to consistency of your trees. So if
nothing else you can look forward to bumper crop again next year

http://www.my-garden-hammock.com

The year before was pretty sparse. I attributed that to some pruning I
had done during the winter. I guess if I get a bumper crop next year I'll
have a much better idea if that is the case. It's a very old tree, but it
has very large green/red striped apples that are quite good. Last year we
got hundreds of apples from it. Literally hundreds of apples, omg it was
loaded!

Since you now admit to pruning in winter then you've answered your
question.


I did not prune at all last winter, so pruning does not explain the lack of
blossoms this year.


Dealing with Shelly is kinda like the "Magic Christian", where you dive
into crap in hopes of coming up with something of value. Rarely happens.

Biennial Bearing:
Occasionally certain fruit trees, such as apples, bear heavily one year
and sparsely the next. This is called biennial bearing. The buds of most
hardy fruit trees are set during the previous summer, and an especially
heavy crop one year may prevent adequate bud formation for the following
year. Biennial bearing is difficult to alter or correct. However, it is
possible to induce a return to normal yearly fruit production by early
and heavy thinning during the year in which the trees are producing
their large yield. Thirty to 40 healthy leaves are needed to produce
good quality fruit; within 30 days after bloom, thin to leave only four
to seven fruit per yard along the branches.
http://www.uri.edu/ce/factsheets/she...treesfail.html

It wasn't a particularly cold winter in the Wilammette Valley, was it?
Frozen buds and all that sort of thing? It was mild here in northern
California, so I'm presuming that it was the same there, only wetter.

Good luck,
--

- Billy
"For the first time in the history of the world, every human being
is now subjected to contact with dangerous chemicals, from the
moment of conception until death." - Rachel Carson

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WI29wVQN8Go

http://www.haaretz.com/hasen/spages/1072040.html
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Old 06-05-2009, 05:59 PM posted to rec.gardens
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Posts: 1,342
Default No apple blossoms on apple trees this year?


"Zootal" wrote in message
...

"brooklyn1" wrote in message
...

"Zootal" wrote in message
...

wrote in message
...
On May 5, 11:22 am, Pat Kiewicz wrote:
Zootal said:



My apple trees have very few blossoms on them this year. Last year
they
were loaded, this year next to nothing. I'm in the mid Wilammette
Valley,
Oregon. Anyone else in the Northwest observing this?

Some apple varieties have a strong tendency to develop a pattern of
alternate year bearing. Your big crop last year set you up for a small
crop this year. Extra fruit thinning may be advisable next year, in an
attempt to break the pattern.

--
Pat in Plymouth MI

"So, it was all a dream."
"No dear, this is the dream, you're still in the cell."

email valid but not regularly monitored

I that it has got a lot to do with the crop that you had last year
like pat said many apple varieties will have a good year and the a
bad, do you remember what happened the year before? if you can that
will give you a good picture as to consistency of your trees. So if
nothing else you can look forward to bumper crop again next year

http://www.my-garden-hammock.com


The year before was pretty sparse. I attributed that to some pruning I
had done during the winter.

^^^^^^^

I guess if I get a bumper crop next year I'll have a much better idea if
that is the case. It's a very old tree, but it has very large green/red
striped apples that are quite good. Last year we got hundreds of apples
from it. Literally hundreds of apples, omg it was loaded!

Since you now admit to pruning in winter then you've answered your
question.


I did not prune at all last winter, so pruning does not explain the lack
of blossoms this year.

It sure looks like you did say you pruned last winter, see above^^^^^^^^.
Perhaps you weren't being very clear.



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Old 06-05-2009, 09:30 PM posted to rec.gardens
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Posts: 40
Default No apple blossoms on apple trees this year?


"Billy" wrote in message
...
In article ,
"Zootal" wrote:

"brooklyn1" wrote in message
...

"Zootal" wrote in message
...

wrote in message
...
On May 5, 11:22 am, Pat Kiewicz wrote:
Zootal said:



My apple trees have very few blossoms on them this year. Last year
they
were loaded, this year next to nothing. I'm in the mid Wilammette
Valley,
Oregon. Anyone else in the Northwest observing this?

Some apple varieties have a strong tendency to develop a pattern of
alternate year bearing. Your big crop last year set you up for a
small
crop this year. Extra fruit thinning may be advisable next year, in
an
attempt to break the pattern.

--
Pat in Plymouth MI

"So, it was all a dream."
"No dear, this is the dream, you're still in the cell."

email valid but not regularly monitored

I that it has got a lot to do with the crop that you had last year
like pat said many apple varieties will have a good year and the a
bad, do you remember what happened the year before? if you can that
will give you a good picture as to consistency of your trees. So if
nothing else you can look forward to bumper crop again next year

http://www.my-garden-hammock.com

The year before was pretty sparse. I attributed that to some pruning I
had done during the winter. I guess if I get a bumper crop next year
I'll
have a much better idea if that is the case. It's a very old tree, but
it
has very large green/red striped apples that are quite good. Last year
we
got hundreds of apples from it. Literally hundreds of apples, omg it
was
loaded!

Since you now admit to pruning in winter then you've answered your
question.


I did not prune at all last winter, so pruning does not explain the lack
of
blossoms this year.


Dealing with Shelly is kinda like the "Magic Christian", where you dive
into crap in hopes of coming up with something of value. Rarely happens.

Biennial Bearing:
Occasionally certain fruit trees, such as apples, bear heavily one year
and sparsely the next. This is called biennial bearing. The buds of most
hardy fruit trees are set during the previous summer, and an especially
heavy crop one year may prevent adequate bud formation for the following
year. Biennial bearing is difficult to alter or correct. However, it is
possible to induce a return to normal yearly fruit production by early
and heavy thinning during the year in which the trees are producing
their large yield. Thirty to 40 healthy leaves are needed to produce
good quality fruit; within 30 days after bloom, thin to leave only four
to seven fruit per yard along the branches.
http://www.uri.edu/ce/factsheets/she...treesfail.html

It wasn't a particularly cold winter in the Wilammette Valley, was it?
Frozen buds and all that sort of thing? It was mild here in northern
California, so I'm presuming that it was the same there, only wetter.



The winter before last we got a foot of snow in April. And had a bumper
crop. This last winter was very mild, little ice, little frost, no snow. No
buds.

I'm good with the biennial bearing. I have a large pear tree that is
absolutely loaded with blossoms. I'm going to have to thin it because there
is no way a tree can support that much fruit. So I'll can pears instead of
apples this summer


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Old 07-05-2009, 02:16 AM posted to rec.gardens
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Posts: 1,179
Default No apple blossoms on apple trees this year?

In article ,
"Zootal" wrote:

"Billy" wrote in message
...
In article ,
"Zootal" wrote:

"brooklyn1" wrote in message
...

"Zootal" wrote in message
...

wrote in message
..
.
On May 5, 11:22 am, Pat Kiewicz wrote:
Zootal said:



My apple trees have very few blossoms on them this year. Last year
they
were loaded, this year next to nothing. I'm in the mid Wilammette
Valley,
Oregon. Anyone else in the Northwest observing this?

Some apple varieties have a strong tendency to develop a pattern of
alternate year bearing. Your big crop last year set you up for a
small
crop this year. Extra fruit thinning may be advisable next year, in
an
attempt to break the pattern.

--
Pat in Plymouth MI

"So, it was all a dream."
"No dear, this is the dream, you're still in the cell."

email valid but not regularly monitored

I that it has got a lot to do with the crop that you had last year
like pat said many apple varieties will have a good year and the a
bad, do you remember what happened the year before? if you can that
will give you a good picture as to consistency of your trees. So if
nothing else you can look forward to bumper crop again next year

http://www.my-garden-hammock.com

The year before was pretty sparse. I attributed that to some pruning I
had done during the winter. I guess if I get a bumper crop next year
I'll
have a much better idea if that is the case. It's a very old tree, but
it
has very large green/red striped apples that are quite good. Last year
we
got hundreds of apples from it. Literally hundreds of apples, omg it
was
loaded!

Since you now admit to pruning in winter then you've answered your
question.


I did not prune at all last winter, so pruning does not explain the lack
of
blossoms this year.


Dealing with Shelly is kinda like the "Magic Christian", where you dive
into crap in hopes of coming up with something of value. Rarely happens.

Biennial Bearing:
Occasionally certain fruit trees, such as apples, bear heavily one year
and sparsely the next. This is called biennial bearing. The buds of most
hardy fruit trees are set during the previous summer, and an especially
heavy crop one year may prevent adequate bud formation for the following
year. Biennial bearing is difficult to alter or correct. However, it is
possible to induce a return to normal yearly fruit production by early
and heavy thinning during the year in which the trees are producing
their large yield. Thirty to 40 healthy leaves are needed to produce
good quality fruit; within 30 days after bloom, thin to leave only four
to seven fruit per yard along the branches.
http://www.uri.edu/ce/factsheets/she...treesfail.html

It wasn't a particularly cold winter in the Wilammette Valley, was it?
Frozen buds and all that sort of thing? It was mild here in northern
California, so I'm presuming that it was the same there, only wetter.



The winter before last we got a foot of snow in April. And had a bumper
crop. This last winter was very mild, little ice, little frost, no snow. No
buds.

I'm good with the biennial bearing. I have a large pear tree that is
absolutely loaded with blossoms. I'm going to have to thin it because there
is no way a tree can support that much fruit. So I'll can pears instead of
apples this summer


This happens with grapes as well. I'm not a grower but when the vines
support a large crop, they don't store enough starch in their roots for
the following year's bloom and leafing out.
--

- Billy
"For the first time in the history of the world, every human being
is now subjected to contact with dangerous chemicals, from the
moment of conception until death." - Rachel Carson

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WI29wVQN8Go

http://www.haaretz.com/hasen/spages/1072040.html


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Old 07-05-2009, 05:32 AM posted to rec.gardens
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Posts: 37
Default No apple blossoms on apple trees this year?

On May 4, 2:58*pm, "Zootal" wrote:
My apple trees have very few blossoms on them this year. Last *year they
were loaded, this year next to nothing. I'm in the mid Wilammette Valley,
Oregon. Anyone else in the Northwest observing this?


I'm on the other side of the mountains in Oregon, and our tree has
been pretty thin this year too. Totally aware of the biennial bearing,
but thinning had helped balance it quite a bit in past years. This
would be the first year for a thin harvest. We are typically a few
weeks behind the Willamette Valley, so I'm still hopeful.

- Paul
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Old 12-05-2009, 10:42 AM
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First recorded activity by GardenBanter: May 2009
Location: Newcastle upn Tyne
Posts: 4
Default

Sometimes the tree's just have a bit of a rest.

It will also depend on if your winter/spring was any different to normal.

Here, the trees normally get blossom and then we get winds which blows them all off.

We have a plum tree and every 3 or 4 years it has a huge crop and the rest of the time it grows 3 or 4 plums.


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