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Old 09-07-2006, 05:59 AM posted to rec.gardens.roses
David Anderson
 
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Default Winterizing in North Dakota

I am in Minot, North Dakota and was wondering the best way to prepare my
hybrid tea roses for the winter. I have heard that bone meal helps to
develop more cold hardy root systems and that letting the last roses of
summer fade on the plant and develop rose hips is also a good way to
prepare the plant. Should I mound the base with soil, tie up the branches,
and then insulate them with straw inside of a cage of some sort before the
first hard freeze?

I was going to winterize them last year, but my daughter was born just as
the first freeze of the year hit (along with a blizzard that dumped over a
foot of snow) while all the canes were still vigorous, healthy, and
producing flowers. It was the first weekend of October, and unfortunately
with a new daughter I didn't have time to get out after that to tend to
them. Fortunately it was a mild winter, but I hope to get them taken care
of properly before this next one hits. Any tips would be appreciated.

David

P.S. My Chicago Peace rose survived and came back, but seems to have almost
miniature leaves this year. It was supposed to be a plant with its own
root, so I would imagine I'm not seeing the plant from the original root
coming up after the graft died. Any ideas on what could cause that?

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Old 09-07-2006, 03:56 PM posted to rec.gardens.roses
Gail Futoran
 
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Default Winterizing in North Dakota

"David Anderson" wrote in message
...
I am in Minot, North Dakota and was wondering the best way to prepare my
hybrid tea roses for the winter. I have heard that bone meal helps to
develop more cold hardy root systems and that letting the last roses of
summer fade on the plant and develop rose hips is also a good way to
prepare the plant. Should I mound the base with soil, tie up the
branches,
and then insulate them with straw inside of a cage of some sort before the
first hard freeze?

I was going to winterize them last year, but my daughter was born just as
the first freeze of the year hit (along with a blizzard that dumped over a
foot of snow) while all the canes were still vigorous, healthy, and
producing flowers. It was the first weekend of October, and unfortunately
with a new daughter I didn't have time to get out after that to tend to
them. Fortunately it was a mild winter, but I hope to get them taken care
of properly before this next one hits. Any tips would be appreciated.

David

P.S. My Chicago Peace rose survived and came back, but seems to have
almost
miniature leaves this year. It was supposed to be a plant with its own
root, so I would imagine I'm not seeing the plant from the original root
coming up after the graft died. Any ideas on what could cause that?


I've never lived that far north so I have no experience
with your situation other than what I've read about
in rose books. However, there are good articles at
the American Rose Society web site www.ars.org

If you look down the first page, you'll see an underlined
Articles. Click on that, it gets you to the articles,
some of which I believe cover wintering roses.

It is a common problem so you should be able to
find some good information. From what I've
read, you appear to have a good start on
winterizing, including not deadheading at the end
of the growing season.

Good luck!

Gail
near San Antonio TX Zone 8


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Old 10-07-2006, 07:04 PM posted to rec.gardens.roses
jtill
 
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Default Winterizing in North Dakota


Gail Futoran wrote:
"David Anderson" wrote in message
...
I am in Minot, North Dakota and was wondering the best way to prepare my
hybrid tea roses for the winter. I have heard that bone meal helps to
develop more cold hardy root systems and that letting the last roses of
summer fade on the plant and develop rose hips is also a good way to
prepare the plant. Should I mound the base with soil, tie up the
branches,
and then insulate them with straw inside of a cage of some sort before the
first hard freeze?

I was going to winterize them last year, but my daughter was born just as
the first freeze of the year hit (along with a blizzard that dumped over a
foot of snow) while all the canes were still vigorous, healthy, and
producing flowers. It was the first weekend of October, and unfortunately
with a new daughter I didn't have time to get out after that to tend to
them. Fortunately it was a mild winter, but I hope to get them taken care
of properly before this next one hits. Any tips would be appreciated.

David

P.S. My Chicago Peace rose survived and came back, but seems to have
almost
miniature leaves this year. It was supposed to be a plant with its own
root, so I would imagine I'm not seeing the plant from the original root
coming up after the graft died. Any ideas on what could cause that?


I've never lived that far north so I have no experience
with your situation other than what I've read about
in rose books. However, there are good articles at
the American Rose Society web site www.ars.org

If you look down the first page, you'll see an underlined
Articles. Click on that, it gets you to the articles,
some of which I believe cover wintering roses.

It is a common problem so you should be able to
find some good information. From what I've
read, you appear to have a good start on
winterizing, including not deadheading at the end
of the growing season.

Good luck!

Gail
near San Antonio TX Zone 8


Gail, what is the name of that guy that bred hardy roses for that area.
If David buys new roses maybe those would do better for him. Ah, yes, I
remember, Buck Hardy Roses. One site that sells them is;

http://www.hardyroses.net/

There are others. They also have info on protecting roses.
Joe T, Baytown

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Old 10-07-2006, 08:11 PM posted to rec.gardens.roses
Gail Futoran
 
Posts: n/a
Default Winterizing in North Dakota

"jtill" wrote in message
oups.com...


Gail, what is the name of that guy that bred hardy roses for that area.
If David buys new roses maybe those would do better for him. Ah, yes, I
remember, Buck Hardy Roses. One site that sells them is;

http://www.hardyroses.net/

There are others. They also have info on protecting roses.
Joe T, Baytown


Oh, nice site, Joe! I wasn't familiar with that one.
I was going to mention roses that grow in
Canada but I see the Hardy Roses site lists
those, too.

To David: Here's a link I found to the NDSU
Extension Service which appears to answer
your questions:
http://www.ext.nodak.edu/extpubs/pla...scap/h118w.htm

Gail
near San Antonio TX Zone 8




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