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Old 19-04-2007, 03:57 AM posted to rec.gardens.roses
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Default Life cycle of the rose killer (beetle)

Last summer 2006 I came home from work on a hot sunny day and noticed
1000s (seriously unbelievable) of beatles hovering/flying/sitting...in
my 3 acre yard. Sorry environmentalists but I got my spray pump and
good ol' "Sevin" and starting terminating NUMEROUS beetles...no joke
they were so bad that it seriously sounded like rain from the beetles
falling out of a tree I sprayed. Ok here is the point/question.....

Since these beetles apparently just came up from the ground (that many
I would have noticed if they came out days before)... did I simply
just kill 1000 beetles OR did I interrupt the reproductive cycle and
therefore hopefully not as many this year. I'm hoping since they
apparently just turned from a grub to a beetle that I killed them
before they could "get it on" with each other and produce more for
this season 2007.

Thanks.


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Old 19-04-2007, 05:19 PM posted to rec.gardens.roses
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Posts: 101
Default Life cycle of the rose killer (beetle)

That might really help. One never knows.

Conditions exist from time to time that enhance the thrive rate of
insects and rodents. The balance in nature run-a muck.

When we have a really bad black 'fly' year - we can only hope for bad storms.
When the storms occur, the next year the crop is lower. Not overheating cars
as they drive to the store!

I look at what you did as a push towards normalcy from an excursion into kayos.

Martin
Martin H. Eastburn
@ home at Lions' Lair with our computer lionslair at consolidated dot net
TSRA, Life; NRA LOH & Endowment Member, Golden Eagle, Patriot"s Medal.
NRA Second Amendment Task Force Charter Founder
IHMSA and NRA Metallic Silhouette maker & member.
http://lufkinced.com/


dohc46 wrote:
Last summer 2006 I came home from work on a hot sunny day and noticed
1000s (seriously unbelievable) of beatles hovering/flying/sitting...in
my 3 acre yard. Sorry environmentalists but I got my spray pump and
good ol' "Sevin" and starting terminating NUMEROUS beetles...no joke
they were so bad that it seriously sounded like rain from the beetles
falling out of a tree I sprayed. Ok here is the point/question.....

Since these beetles apparently just came up from the ground (that many
I would have noticed if they came out days before)... did I simply
just kill 1000 beetles OR did I interrupt the reproductive cycle and
therefore hopefully not as many this year. I'm hoping since they
apparently just turned from a grub to a beetle that I killed them
before they could "get it on" with each other and produce more for
this season 2007.

Thanks.


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Old 20-04-2007, 12:06 AM posted to rec.gardens.roses
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First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Aug 2006
Posts: 99
Default Life cycle of the rose killer (beetle)

Here's some info from http://www.rose-roses.com/problems/badinsects.html

"Japanese Beetles
Popillia japonica Also sometimes known as the Chafer Beetle Rose chafer and
garden chafer are two different varieties. Japanese Beetles are a shiny
copper and green beetle about 1/4 to 1/2 inch long, that can eat entire
flowers as well as foliage. In areas where these are abundant, they can be
devastating to the look of your blooms. Japanese beetles eat large round or
oblong holes in the leaves leaf edges and flowers (especially those with
light colored blooms), sometimes leaving nothing but a leaf skeleton behind.
They usually eat the plant from the top down. They are not going to kill the
plant, but they can cause considerable damage. They are a problem for about
a month to 6 weeks in the summer when they are in their adult flying form.
Before that in the spring, they are 1/2 in to 1 inch long grayish white
grubs living in the soil and the grass below. They feed on grass and roots
at this point. When they start showing up on roses, they appear to have
flown in all at once, but this is just because they all mature at about the
same time. They are a much bigger problem in areas of the USA east of the
Mississippi River. More information can be obtained he
http://ohioline.osu.edu/hyg-fact/2000/2504.html. OR
http://ohioline.osu.edu/hyg-fact/2000/2001.html

Treatment: You need to go out early in the morning or late in the evening
when they are the least active, and shake and pick them off the blooms by
hand into a bucket with soapy water in it. This will kill them. Can be
controlled by introducing milky spore (Bacillus popillae), or certain other
beneficial nematodes into the soil in the spring. These will kill them as
grubs. Unless all of your neighbors do this too however, you will still have
some level of infestation. Another good reason to attract birds to your
garden. You can also try spraying with neem oil, but this is not always
effective. These beetles are repelled by garlic, catnip or geraniums. One
thing that you must be careful about is that the same things that kill these
beetles will kill ladybugs. Using beetle traps usually just attracts your
neighbors beetles over to your yard."

David Smitley, Department of Entomology, Michigan State University, is doing
a lot of work on this subject. There are several good articles on the topic
on Great Lakes Roses website:
http://www.greatlakesroses.com/homep...lecontrol.html

Best Regards

Jeff Southeast Michigan, Zone 5
"dohc46" wrote in message
oups.com...
Last summer 2006 I came home from work on a hot sunny day and noticed
1000s (seriously unbelievable) of beatles hovering/flying/sitting...in
my 3 acre yard. Sorry environmentalists but I got my spray pump and
good ol' "Sevin" and starting terminating NUMEROUS beetles...no joke
they were so bad that it seriously sounded like rain from the beetles
falling out of a tree I sprayed. Ok here is the point/question.....

Since these beetles apparently just came up from the ground (that many
I would have noticed if they came out days before)... did I simply
just kill 1000 beetles OR did I interrupt the reproductive cycle and
therefore hopefully not as many this year. I'm hoping since they
apparently just turned from a grub to a beetle that I killed them
before they could "get it on" with each other and produce more for
this season 2007.

Thanks.





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