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Old 28-01-2007, 01:24 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Our next door neighbours cut their lawns yesterday and this morning they
looks dreadful - the lawns not the neighbours - all wobbly lines and
lumps of grass that were too wet for the mower to pick up.
I have long wide borders and I usually crash about in the undergrowth
getting cross, this year my practical daughter suggested that I set
myself a strip of border to do every day, no more no less, just move up
the garden in an orderly fashion, how do dim mothers give birth to Mary
Poppins like daughters :-)
Every year I manage to leave some wooden handled tools outside all
winter, of course this morning two of them broke, I found one favorite
trowel in the bottom of a lavender bush, so now I have to grovel to HIM
to mend them for me and face another lecture :-(
So now my morning tasks are done and I am going to have lunch but first
I will go and put all my tools away :-)

kate

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Old 28-01-2007, 01:44 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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On 28/1/07 12:24, in article , "Kate
Morgan" wrote:

Our next door neighbours cut their lawns yesterday and this morning they
looks dreadful - the lawns not the neighbours - all wobbly lines and
lumps of grass that were too wet for the mower to pick up.
I have long wide borders and I usually crash about in the undergrowth
getting cross, this year my practical daughter suggested that I set
myself a strip of border to do every day, no more no less, just move up
the garden in an orderly fashion, how do dim mothers give birth to Mary
Poppins like daughters :-)


Actually, that's a brilliant idea and I'm going to copy it. I start in one
bit, then see something horrendous in another bit and get diverted so yo-yo
back and forth like a maniac. Please thank your daughter for me!

Every year I manage to leave some wooden handled tools outside all
winter, of course this morning two of them broke, I found one favorite
trowel in the bottom of a lavender bush, so now I have to grovel to HIM
to mend them for me and face another lecture :-(
So now my morning tasks are done and I am going to have lunch but first
I will go and put all my tools away :-)

I do just the same and I'm trying to make myself follow advice I was given
years ago - always stop at *least* half an hour before you intended to and
use that half hour to clean and put away tools. It helps to carry a bucket
or similar around with you into which you can put small hand tools, gloves,
brandy flask. ;-)

--
Sacha
http://www.hillhousenursery.co.uk
South Devon
http://www.discoverdartmoor.co.uk/
(remove weeds from address)

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Old 28-01-2007, 03:06 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Kate Morgan writes
Our next door neighbours cut their lawns yesterday and this morning they
looks dreadful - the lawns not the neighbours - all wobbly lines and
lumps of grass that were too wet for the mower to pick up.
I have long wide borders and I usually crash about in the undergrowth
getting cross, this year my practical daughter suggested that I set
myself a strip of border to do every day, no more no less, just move up
the garden in an orderly fashion, how do dim mothers give birth to Mary
Poppins like daughters :-)
Every year I manage to leave some wooden handled tools outside all
winter, of course this morning two of them broke, I found one favorite
trowel in the bottom of a lavender bush, so now I have to grovel to HIM
to mend them for me and face another lecture :-(


Or learn to mend your own.

Or do a cost benefit analysis comparing the time finding and putting
away every single time with the rather rare event of spending time
and/or money replacing.

(And remember to keep a count of chisels used for paint stirrers and all
the other typically male ways of misusing tools)
--
Kay
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Old 28-01-2007, 05:19 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Thoughts on a mornings gardening


"Kate Morgan" wrote
Our next door neighbours cut their lawns yesterday and this morning
they looks dreadful - the lawns not the neighbours - all wobbly lines
and lumps of grass that were too wet for the mower to pick up.
I have long wide borders and I usually crash about in the undergrowth
getting cross, this year my practical daughter suggested that I set
myself a strip of border to do every day, no more no less, just move
up the garden in an orderly fashion, how do dim mothers give birth to
Mary Poppins like daughters :-)


:-)

Yes, it's a good idea. It's also a good way of motivating yourself, for
the times when it seems like there's such a lot to do that it's too
overwhelming to begin.

Another way I trick myself into getting started is to tell myself I only
have to do half and hour, then I can stop. By the time I've got into the
swing I'm enjoying myself and then stay out and do much more.

--
Sue

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Old 28-01-2007, 05:24 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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snip
:-)

Yes, it's a good idea. It's also a good way of motivating yourself, for
the times when it seems like there's such a lot to do that it's too
overwhelming to begin.

Another way I trick myself into getting started is to tell myself I only
have to do half and hour, then I can stop. By the time I've got into the
swing I'm enjoying myself and then stay out and do much more.

do you find that sometimes when things are going really well you do far
too much and then are exhausted the next day ?


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Old 28-01-2007, 05:54 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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"Kate Morgan" wrote
do you find that sometimes when things are going really well you do
far too much and then are exhausted the next day ?


Yes! Especially if it involves barrowing or turning compost. I've got to
move three large wooden bins, two of which are fairly full, to a better
site further down the garden soon. I'm hoping I can sweet-talk the Other
Half into helping.

--
Sue

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Old 28-01-2007, 09:15 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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"Sacha" wrote in message
. uk...
On 28/1/07 12:24, in article ,
"Kate
Morgan" wrote:

Our next door neighbours cut their lawns yesterday and this morning they
looks dreadful - the lawns not the neighbours - all wobbly lines and
lumps of grass that were too wet for the mower to pick up.
I have long wide borders and I usually crash about in the undergrowth
getting cross, this year my practical daughter suggested that I set
myself a strip of border to do every day, no more no less, just move up
the garden in an orderly fashion, how do dim mothers give birth to Mary
Poppins like daughters :-)


Actually, that's a brilliant idea and I'm going to copy it. I start in
one
bit, then see something horrendous in another bit and get diverted so
yo-yo
back and forth like a maniac. Please thank your daughter for me!

Every year I manage to leave some wooden handled tools outside all
winter, of course this morning two of them broke, I found one favorite
trowel in the bottom of a lavender bush, so now I have to grovel to HIM
to mend them for me and face another lecture :-(
So now my morning tasks are done and I am going to have lunch but first
I will go and put all my tools away :-)

I do just the same and I'm trying to make myself follow advice I was given
years ago - always stop at *least* half an hour before you intended to and
use that half hour to clean and put away tools. It helps to carry a
bucket
or similar around with you into which you can put small hand tools,
gloves,
brandy flask. ;-)


The brandy I can understand, but what on earth is all that other stuff?

Alan


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Old 29-01-2007, 12:12 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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"K" wrote in message
...
Kate Morgan writes
Our next door neighbours cut their lawns yesterday and this morning they
looks dreadful - the lawns not the neighbours - all wobbly lines and
lumps of grass that were too wet for the mower to pick up.
I have long wide borders and I usually crash about in the undergrowth
getting cross, this year my practical daughter suggested that I set
myself a strip of border to do every day, no more no less, just move up
the garden in an orderly fashion, how do dim mothers give birth to Mary
Poppins like daughters :-)
Every year I manage to leave some wooden handled tools outside all
winter, of course this morning two of them broke, I found one favorite
trowel in the bottom of a lavender bush, so now I have to grovel to HIM
to mend them for me and face another lecture :-(


Or learn to mend your own.

Or do a cost benefit analysis comparing the time finding and putting away
every single time with the rather rare event of spending time and/or money
replacing.

(And remember to keep a count of chisels used for paint stirrers and all
the other typically male ways of misusing tools)


Males, misusing tools!

How dare you!

Go and wash your mouth out this instant!

Alan

--
Kay



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Old 30-01-2007, 04:42 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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On Sun, 28 Jan 2007 12:24:09 -0000, Kate Morgan wrote:
getting cross, this year my practical daughter suggested that I set
myself a strip of border to do every day, no more no less, just move up
the garden in an orderly fashion,


Yes !
or
Raised beds !!
For 20y I did as the books said, dug in copious quantities of compost
heaps and leaf stuff, all to no avail on my heavy clay, it just
gobbled it up , with nothing to show in the following year(s).
Then I made raised no-dig beds.
Bliss !
Instant enjoyment (well almost ! after I got over the surprise !!)

Why am I relating this ? Because of the spin-off :-
Just do half of that bed and have a cuppa, then
do the other half bed next,
and leave the other beds till the following days.
Consequently, the 'patch' is divided up into bits one can admire with
a cuppa
Much less intimidating and before you know it the whole lot is done
well ahead of time !

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Old 30-01-2007, 08:31 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Posts: 675
Default Thoughts on a mornings gardening

On Sun, 28 Jan 2007 12:24:09 -0000, Kate Morgan wrote:
getting cross, this year my practical daughter suggested that I set
myself a strip of border to do every day, no more no less, just move up
the garden in an orderly fashion,


Yes !
or
Raised beds !!
For 20y I did as the books said, dug in copious quantities of compost
heaps and leaf stuff, all to no avail on my heavy clay, it just
gobbled it up , with nothing to show in the following year(s).
Then I made raised no-dig beds.
Bliss !
Instant enjoyment (well almost ! after I got over the surprise !!)

Why am I relating this ? Because of the spin-off :-
Just do half of that bed and have a cuppa, then
do the other half bed next,
and leave the other beds till the following days.
Consequently, the 'patch' is divided up into bits one can admire with
a cuppa
Much less intimidating and before you know it the whole lot is done
well ahead of time !

I quite fancy the idea of raised beds,very useful in view of advancing
year`s plus back ache, trouble is my borders are very established and I
could not take on the job of changing everything now. So far my method
of doing a strip a day is working :-)


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